Science Insider: Does North Korea really have an H-bomb?

Energy & Matter

Science Insider: Does North Korea really have an H-bomb?

Stump, North Korea, H-bomb, earthquakeScience Insider, the online news site for the American Association for the Advancement of Science, quoted SMU seismologist Brian Stump, saying seismic data confirms that an earthquake in North Korea was triggered by an explosion there Jan. 5. Richard Stone, who covers international news for Science quoted Stump in the Jan. 6 article, "Does North Korea really have an H-bomb?"

Dallas Morning News: Mounting evidence suggests Dallas quakes are induced by human activity

SMU seismologists presented new earthquake findings at the American Geophysical Union annual meeting. (Credit: DMN) Science journalist Anna Kuchment with The Dallas Morning News covered the comments of SMU seismologists Heather DeShon and Beatrice Magnani speaking during the annual American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, Calif. DeShon and Magnani presented their latest research on North Texas ground shaking.

Top Quark: Precise particle measurement improves subatomic tool probing mysteries of universe

Top Quark, physics, Higgs boson, FermilabPhysicists at Southern Methodist University have a new precise measurement of a key subatomic particle, opening the door to better understanding of our universe. The researchers calculated the new measurement for a critical characteristic — mass — of the Top Quark. The new value adds growing uncertainty to physics’ Standard Model.

September 28, 2015|Categories: Energy & Matter|Tags: , , , |

Fermilab experiment observes change in neutrinos from one type to another over 500 miles

Nova, neutrinos, Fermilab, SMU, CoanInitial data from a new U.S.–based physics experiment indicates scientists are a step closer to understanding neutrinos, the second most abundant particle in the universe, says SMU physics professor Thomas Coan, a principal investigator on the project. Neutrinos are little understood, but indications are they hold clues to why matter overwhelmingly survived after the Big Bang instead of just energy in the form of light.

August 7, 2015|Categories: Earth & Climate, Energy & Matter, Videos|Tags: , , |

SMU conference promotes technology, economics of geothermal production in oil and gas fields

Southern Methodist University’s renowned SMU Geothermal Laboratory will host its seventh international energy conference and workshop on the SMU campus May 19-20. The conference is designed to promote transition of oil and gas fields to electricity-producing geothermal systems by harnessing waste heat and fluids from both active and abandoned fields.

SMU seismology team to cooperate with state, federal scientists in study of May 7 Venus, Texas earthquake

Injctn sign 400x300SMU’s seismology team was not surprised by the magnitude 4.0 earthquake that occurred near Venus, Texas, recently, having been aware of multiple smaller earthquakes identified nearby in recent months. The team has recommended to state lawmakers a permanent regional network of monitors, supplemented by portable instruments, to deploy in a time-sensitive manner.

James Brooks awarded high honor from American Association of Petroleum Geologists

James E. Brooks honored by AAPGJames E. Brooks, provost emeritus and professor emeritus in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, has been recognized with one of the highest honors of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, AAPG. Brooks has received the 2015 AAPG Presidential Award for Exemplary Service “for a lifetime of inspired and dedicated service to his profession and community, and for the education of hundreds of students for whom he has served as an outstanding teacher, wise mentor and genuine friend.”

1st proton collisions at the world’s largest science experiment expected to start the first or second week of June

Dallas Hall w scatterThe schedule announcement came during an international physics conference on the SMU campus from senior research scientist Albert De Roeck, a staff member at CERN and a leading scientist on one of the Large Hadron Collider's key experiments in Geneva. “It will be about another six weeks to commission the machine, and many things can still happen on the way,” said De Roeck. The LHC in early April was restarted for its second three-year run after a two-year pause to upgrade the machine to operate at higher energies. At higher energy, physicists worldwide expect to see new discoveries about the laws that govern our natural universe.

WFAA 8 ABC: Geologists release details of Azle earthquakes study

WFAA 8 ABC news reporter Byron Harris reported on the SMU-led team of seismologists whose recent study found that large volumes of wastewater injection combined with saltwater (brine) extraction from natural gas wells is the most likely cause of earthquakes near Azle, Texas, from late 2013 through spring 2014. The study published in Nature Communications. WFAA aired the segment April, 21, 2015.

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