Economics & Statistics

Imposing trade restrictions on parallel imports can motivate a firm to export, study finds

Imposing trade restrictions on parallel imports has the surprising effect of motivating a firm to export, according to a new study using game theory economic analysis, says co-author Santanu Roy, SMU. The study found that diverse parallel importing policies make it possible to analyze for the first time how competition between firms and allowing or banning parallel imports can influence competition. Continue reading

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USA Today: Women scientists lose out on research prizes


USA Today’s “ScienceFair” blog has covered the research of SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln. In a March 13 entry, journalist Dan Vergano writes about Lincoln’s latest findings surrounding discrimination against women in the STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math.

Dubbed “the Mathilda Effect,” Lincoln has shown that women in the STEM areas do not receive the same recognition for their research and achievements as do men in those fields. Continue reading

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UPI: Study looks at how language excludes many in EU

UPI and other media outlets have covered the research of SMU economist Shlomo Weber.

In the new book “How Many Languages Do We Need? The Economics of Linguistic Diversity” (Princeton University Press), Weber and his co-author, Victor Ginsburgh, researched the costs and benefits of the many languages across the globe. Continue reading

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Fermilab Today: Top quark mass team wages war on two fronts

The research of SMU physicist Robert Kehoe, a professor in the SMU Department of Physics, has been featured by Fermilab Today. The magazine is the official publication of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Chicago. Fermi is a high-energy particle physics laboratory credited in 1995 with discovery of the fundamental particle, the top quark.

The article, “Top quark mass team wages war on two fronts,” appears in Fermilab Today‘s Jan. 26 edition as the “Result of the Week.”
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Vast majority of European Union citizens are marginalized by dominance of English language

A new study finds nearly two-thirds of the European Union’s 500 million people are linguistically disenfranchised because they don’t speak English, which is the EU’s most dominant official language.

History has shown that political regimes mandate single languages for efficiency or social control. But limiting linguistic diversity can backfire, says economist Shlomo Weber, Southern Methodist University. Continue reading

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International Monetary Fund: A review of “How Many Languages Do We Need?”

Renowned non-fiction author Henry Hitchings covers SMU economist Shlomo Weber’s new book “How Many Languages Do We Need? The Economics of Linguistic Diversity” (Princeton University Press).

Writing for the International Monetary Fund, Hitchings’ review “Speaking in Tongues” notes that Weber and his co-author, Victor Ginsburgh, have scrupulously researched the costs and benefits of the many languages across the globe. Hitchings, the author of “The Language Wars” and “The Secret Life of Words” among other books, notes that the books most thought-provoking section is the case study of linguistic policy in the European Union. Continue reading

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The New York Times: The Fast Life of Oscar Pistorius

The New York Times has written a comprehensive piece on the long-running global controversy surrounding double-amputee runner Oscar Pistorius, the South African vying to compete in the Olympics.

The Jan. 18 article, “The Fast Life of Oscar Pistorius,” cites extensively the work of SMU’s Peter Weyand, an expert in human locomotion.
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NSF: New forecasting algorithm helps predict hurricane intensity and wind speed

The National Science Foundation has covered the hurricane modeling research of SMU engineers Yu Su, Michael Hahsler and Margaret Dunham in a Dec. 5 “Discoveries” article on its web site.

Su, Hahsler and Dunham have written a white paper on their method for predicting hurricanes: “Learning a Prediction Interval Model for Hurricane Intensities.” The three scientists are in the SMU Lyle School‘s Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Continue reading

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Public health insurance provides insured infants better, less costly care than private plans

In the fierce national debate over a new federal law that requires all Americans to have health insurance, it’s widely assumed that private health insurance can do a better job than public insurance.

But a first-of-its-kind study of newly available government data found just the opposite for infants covered by insurance, says economist Manan Roy in SMU’s Department of Economics. Continue reading

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