Introducing Meadows Prize Winner New Cities, Future Ruins’ New Site and Convening

 

Dust storm in Phoenix
Dust storm in Phoenix

Meadows Prize Winner New Cities, Future Ruins, a curatorial initiative inviting artists, designers and thinkers to reimagine the extreme urbanism of America’s Western Sun Belt, has just launched an expanded website. It features the first details of November’s events in Dallas, including a list of early confirmed participants and links to register.

The convening will run November 11-14, 2016. This hybrid conference and festival will be open to the public, feature artists’ projects, bus tours, and events throughout the city, as well as talks, roundtable discussions, screenings, and workshops. Confirmed participants include Noura Al-Sayeh, Roberto Bedoya, Mary Ellen Carroll, Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman, Naima J. Keith, OtherOthers, Postcommodity, Andrew Ross, Elizabeth Tandy Shermer and Imre Szeman, with a larger list and full schedule to be announced later this summer.

You can find out more about each participant, a formative schedule for the convening, and a curatorial statement on the expanded site.

Register for the Convening | Meet the Partners | 

More About New Cities, Future Ruins

New Cities, Future Ruins will engage the cities of the Western Sun Belt as arenas for pioneering art and design. The region, stretching from Houston to Denver and from Phoenix to San Diego, is home to some of the fastest-growing cities in the country, symbols of opportunity and entrepreneurialism, historic cradles of free market capitalism. Their path, however, may be unsustainable: located in delicate ecosystems, the unprecedented growth of these cities is marked by sprawl and resource overuse, dramatic demographic shifts and struggles over immigration. Some of the most pressing questions of our moment – questions of whether current ways of life can or should persist environmentally, economically and socially – are in few places as clear or as compelling as in these Western Sun Belt cities. Suburban in texture, these new cities are twenty-first century spaces that resist creative traditions inherited from the industrial city. Bringing critical and innovative art and design practice from around the world to bear on this urban landscape, the initiative seeks to foster visionary thought and artistic experimentation at these urgent sites, places that both embody and illuminate global crises of rapid urbanization.

Follow NCFR and help spread the word: Instagram: @newcitiesfutureruins, Twitter: @newcitiesfuture, Facebook: New Cities Future Ruins

Why SMU Meadows? Six Questions for Students

Sasha Davis, B.F.A. Theatre/ Theatre Studies ’16
Sasha Davis, B.F.A. Theatre/ Theatre Studies ’16

Hear five students talk about their choices, majors, internships and more

“… Totally got my world flipped … We think you can do great things … Ability to double major …” are just some of the comments shared by five performing and visual arts majors on why they picked SMU Meadows as their college of choice. They were also accepted to such schools as Carnegie Mellon, Berkeley, UCLA, University of Rochester, Indiana University, University of Minnesota, University of Texas-Austin, Florida State University, Marymount Manhattan, The Hartt School, Santa Clara University, Pomona College, University of Nevada/Las Vegas, Texas Christian University and more. Find out why they chose SMU:

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrW907QKBOI[/youtube]

Six Photos from the SMU Division of Art Faculty Exhibition

The neon Palestine, Texas, 2015 by Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Art Noah Simblist, faces the rotunda in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. 39 x 28 inches.
The neon Palestine, Texas, 2015 by Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Art Noah Simblist, faces the rotunda in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. 39 x 28 inches.

The Faculty Exhibition will showcase works by professors in the Division of Art, including a wide range of media. This exhibition gives students and the DFW community the opportunity to see and experience the work of teaching artists. Meadows staff member Mary Guthrie stopped by to preview six of the many works.

The exhibit is running currently at the SMU Pollock Gallery, and will close on Saturday, March 19.  

Detail from Black Rock Mesa, 2015 by Mary Vernon, professor of art and Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor. Oil and ink on Yupo, 26 x 80 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Valley House Gallery.
Detail from Black Rock Mesa, 2015 by Mary Vernon, professor of art and Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor. Oil and ink on Yupo, 26 x 80 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Valley House Gallery.
Visiting Professor Travis LaMothe’s Hard Rock Cafe, 2015. Pants, frame, 57 x 40 inches.
Visiting Professor Travis LaMothe’s Hard Rock Cafe, 2015. Pants, frame, 57 x 40 inches.
One of three works by Professor of Art Michael Corris, Storage Problem #11. Inkjet print on aluminum, 22 x 17 inches.
One of three works by Professor of Art Michael Corris, Storage Problem #11. Inkjet print on aluminum, 22 x 17 inches.
Detail from Sunrise / Hawaii I, 2015, by faculty member Kalee Appleton. Archival inkjet print, 30 x 20 inches.
Detail from Sunrise / Hawaii I, 2015, by faculty member Kalee Appleton. Archival inkjet print, 30 x 20 inches.
Adjunct Lecturer Kael Alford’s Juliette on the Levee, 2009, one of three Alford works in the show. Archival inkjet print, 14 x 14 inches.
Adjunct Lecturer Kael Alford’s Juliette on the Levee, 2009, one of three Alford works in the show. Archival inkjet print, 14 x 14 inches.