Photos from SMU Art’s New York Colloquium

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Every year, SMU Meadows encourages students to explore the arts outside of the traditional classroom environment.

During the New York Colloquium, students visit a range of museums, galleries, artists’ studios and other venues appropriate to the development of their critical and professional studies in art. Approximately 25 students participate each year, with at least half from the Division of Art, both graduate and undergraduate. The Colloquium forms the basis for contemporary art studies for our students, and provides exposure to the international art world as represented in New York.

In honor of the 2017 event, Photography Major Chris Coyne, a participant in the 2016 Colloquium, sends us a photo dispatch.

The New York Colloquium: Everything You Need to Know

  • Class historically meets during the first two weeks (14 days) in January in New York City
  • This class is centered on intensive analysis, discussion, and writing concerning works of art in museum collections, gallery exhibitions, and alternative exhibition spaces. The class topics studied will deal with the philosophical as well as the practical in order to define and better understand the nature of the art that our society produces and values

Contact Us to Sign Up | Read the Synopsis | Download the Syllabus

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Meadows Alum Kyle Hobratschk: Building an Artists’ Enclave in Corsicana

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All photos by Kim Leeson

Kyle Hobratschk (B.F.A. Art, ’11) loves older buildings with character.

As an under-graduate he began doing drawings and watercolors of homes for the Park Cities Historic & Preservation Society, leading to commissions from real estate agents, homeowners and commercial developers.

Hobratschk was featured in a can’t-miss interactive feature in the Dallas Morning News entitled Corsicana diaries. 

Hobratschk on working in Corsicana, via our 2013 MPrint story:  “It’s shown me the importance of building community,” he says. “Growing up, I thought of an artist as someone alone in a studio. You don’t imagine working WITH other people until you realize that a lot of things you want to do aren’t possible alone. I couldn’t do Corsicana on my own.”

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