New SMU Meadows student Laurence Lundy is starting his college years on a positive note.

Just a few weeks before arriving on campus at SMU, he attended a journalism workshop in New Orleans hosted by the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). During the 2017 “JSHOP,” Lundy teamed up with fellow workshop attendee Hannah Monteilh to produce an article on InspireNOLA, a program that promotes academic excellence in charter schools.

smu meadows school of the arts journalism facilities

SMU Meadows Division of Journalism practices convergence journalism, whereby students learn to package news and entertainment pieces across broadcast, print and digital platforms.

Lundy wrote; Monteilh was in charge of photography. As part of their research, they interviewed and photographed educators at Andrew H. Wilson Charter School in New Orleans and captured their views on the new school year.

On top of that honor, Lundy was also awarded NABJ’s first-ever Russell LaCour Legacy Scholarship, named after longtime NABJ member, JSHOP director and Oklahoma-based news editor Russell LaCour. According to Kennedy Haydel, the award, which was funded in its inaugural year by Capital One Bank, is given to a JSHOP participant who has just completed high school and is heading into their freshman year of college in the fall semester of that same year.

smu journalism student

Laurence Lundy (center) also was recipient of the first-ever Russell LaCour Legacy scholarship

SMU Meadows Division of Journalism practices convergence journalism, whereby students learn to package news and entertainment pieces across broadcast, print and digital platforms.

Students create several kinds of programs in the HD broadcast studio, covering news (they receive the same raw video feeds as CNN and CBS), sports, politics and more. Students can also write for the print edition of SMU Campus Weekly or the annual SMU Rotunda yearbook. Fashion students create the student-led SMU LOOK magazine, producing one issue per semester.