Apple’s iLife and iWork are now available for free.

iLife and iWork now freeWith Apple’s recent updates to the iLife and iWork applications at the end of March, Apple has made the software available for free to all users. Previously, you had to purchase a new device or Mac to get the software at that price. Now users with older Macs can have access to the latest tools freely. The only downside is the Apple apps usually require more recent versions of the OS and/or computer processor. Continue reading Apple’s iLife and iWork are now available for free.

Apple Offers Pro Apps Bundle with Final Cut & Logic for $200

Apple Pro Apps BundleLast week, Apple released a new suite of professional applications aimed at the K-12 and Higher Ed markets. This Pro Apps Bundle for Education includes their popular Final Cut Pro X for video editing, the award-winning Logic Pro X for audio editing, Motion 5 for motion graphics, Compressor 4 for compressing those videos, and MainStage 3 for using your audio recordings in live audio performances. Continue reading Apple Offers Pro Apps Bundle with Final Cut & Logic for $200

Security Holes in iOS 9 Patched with Update

iOS HomescreenApple just released the iOS 9.3.3 update, the final version for iOS 9 before the new iOS 10 this fall. For this reason, Apple allowed for extra testing time taking over two months with five separate betas to ensure the OS is as secure and stable as possible. With this update, Apple patches security holes in iOS 9‘s Calendar, CoreGraphics, FaceTime, and Safari apps. Each of these fixes addresses the ability for hackers to run unauthorized code or expose private information. Continue reading Security Holes in iOS 9 Patched with Update

Apple WWDC 2016: What’s New

macOS with SiriIt’s that time of year again! Apple is hosting their annual Worldwide Developers Conference this week in San Francisco. The WWDC isn’t usually as flashy as the iPhone reveals, but there’s still a lot of cool features and products you can expect to find on your Apple devices in the coming months.

One of the bigger talking points during WWDC is OS X, and this year is no exception. The most noticeable change is the name. After fifteen years, OS X will now be known simply as macOS. The next upgrade of the operating system will be called Sierra, named after the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

The new macOS will also include the debut of the iPhone’s voice-activated assistant, Siri. This will allow Mac users to use the same voice commands they use on their iPhone on their desktop as well. Siri has been studying, too! She will now have a huge amount of additional knowledge and commands to interact with desktop apps. The underlying technology behind Siri is now opened up to developers as well, so expect to see third-party apps using the technology soon.

Also on the horizon is the latest version of iOS: version 10. iOS 10 brings additional security features to iPhones and iPads, along with streamlined notifications on your lock screen.

End of support for QuickTime for Windows

QuickTime for WindowsRecently it was announced that Apple will no longer offer patches and will end support for QuickTime for Windows, their multimedia software package for the Microsoft OS. This move came about shortly after several vulnerabilities were detected in the software. For over five years, Windows has supported popular media formats, such as H.264 and AAC, that were enabled by the installation of Quicktime. Also, all Windows web browsers support online video without the need for plug-ins like QuickTime. Due to these new vulnerabilities, the lack of need for QuickTime for video, and the fact that Apple will not patch the software, OIT is moving to disable QuickTime for Windows on all SMU managed Windows computers starting on June 14th.

For those using video software that requires QuickTime being installed on Windows to enable video codecs, most notably Apple ProRes, this move might affect your workflow. Adobe has been working to remove the dependency on QuickTime for the past couple of years, and their software will now run without the need for QuickTime for Windows. The Abobe Creative Cloud Team had been working to support the missing codecs and only last month was able to announce the support for the native reading of ProRes. The fixes will soon be included in updates to the relevant Creative Cloud software. More information will be on the Creative Cloud blog as it becomes available.

If you need to remove QuickTime for Windows from your home computer, follow the instructions for uninstalling QuickTime 7 for Windows on the Apple support site.

For more information, please see below:

Note: This move will not affect Macintosh OS computers, only Windows OS computers.