O365 for SMU Students

sc1_tip1_headerA better way to work for SMU students

With Office 365, you can read, write, collaborate, and present ideas—from virtually anywhere with consistent, clean, and fast experiences.

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Your files are saved online, so you can send everyone a link to the file where updates can be made together, at the same time.

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Direct your audience’s attention right to your point in your PowerPoint presentation. Zoom in on a diagram, chart, or graphic with a couple of clicks, and zoom out just as smoothly.

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csc-sc1-tip1_photo3_@2xA PDF time-saver you’ll love

Open a PDF in Word on your desktop, and you can edit content as if you created it in Word.

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Capturing Screenshots in Office

To follow along with last week’s post we wanted to give you a few tips on using screenshots in the Microsoft Suite.

From the Insert tab (available in all of the Office products), select the Screenshot screenshoticon.  Microsoft gives you two options you can use to insert an image. Click on the drop down arrow and either select Available Window, which gives you the option to insert another window into your document like in the example below: blog screenshot

screen clippingOr, you can insert a Screen Clipping, which allows you to select the specific item you want to insert. First, click on the window you want to grab the screenshot from to make the window active. Next, go back to the Office product you want to insert the screenshot into. Select the Screenshot icon and select Screen Clipping, the window that you were previously on will gray out.

The cursor will change to a cross +. Left click and select the area you want to insert. Here, I selected just the clip I wanted.

5 decades
That’s our quick tip of the day.  Happy screen clipping!

 

 

Discover New Features in Microsoft Word (Part 2)

word_primary-100025314-largeBy Rachel Mulry

In Part 1 of this article, we discussed Quick Parts, creating your own templates, and the Screenshot tool. Today we’ll continue with two powerful Word features.

  1. Navigation view:  2014-01-21_8-37-08If you use the styles in Word, not only can you create a consistent polished document, but you can also use the Navigation view to help rearrange and jump to various portions of the file quickly.  You can enable navigation view from the View menu, or you can simply click on the page number in the bottom left corner of the screen.  There are three options in the navigation panel.  Viewing by headings allows you to view the overall structure of your document but also allows you to reorder the sections in a document simply by dragging and dropping!  The page view displays a thumbnail image of each page in the document. You can jump to the desired page by clicking the thumbnail.  The results view allows you to search for words, images etc in your document and then navigate to each instance where that search term was detected.  To turn off the navigation view, just click on the page number on the bottom left and you’re back to full screen view of your document.
  2. additionalAvailable actions properties: I admit I stumbled across this nifty feature while I was writing this article!
    By default, the available actions menu is turned off.  However, once it is enabled it will allow you to right click on certain types of data and select from additional options.  For example, you could right click on a data and create a calendar appointment! Or right click on an email address and add it to your Outlook contacts. To enable this feature, click File—Options—Proofing— AutoCorrect.  Click the Actions tab.  Then check “enable additional actions in the right-click menu”.  Select the types of data that you wish to enable these actions. Click OK.  When you are viewing or creating a document, simply right click on the text and a new “additional actions” field will appear.

These are just a few of the many powerful features in Word.  There are so many others waiting to be discovered!  So be adventurous!  Click through those menus on the ribbon or view a few new tutorials to discover something new in Word today!

Discover New Features in Microsoft Word (Part 1)

word_primary-100025314-largeAlthough I use Word on a daily basis, every now and then I uncover a feature or shortcut I didn’t know existed.  With literally thousands of different features, it’s no surprise that the application offers more than you or I typically use!  The following are five powerful features that are easily overlooked.

  1. Quick Parts: Each of us have different blocks of text tquickparthat we use in multiple documents.  For example, if you often arrange meetings or events on campus, you may include a map, driving directions and parking instructions in each event packet.  You may reuse your contact/signature block in documents or a specific logo frequently.  All of these types of data can be stored in your quick parts gallery!  Simply highlight the text—then select InsertQuick PartsSave selection to quick part gallery.  Once you’ve named and saved that component, it will be available from the Insert- Quick Parts menu in any document you create from that same machine!
  2. Create your own template: If you use a certain format or style for specific documents, consider saving that document as a template.  I know many people simply open the existing file, save as a different file name, and then delete the information to reuse the same “style”.  You can make this even easier!  Create the framework of the document as you normally would. Select your fonts, headers, footers, and anything else that should be consistent.  Then click File—Save As.  Save the document as a Word Template.  When you’re ready to use that template, click New—Select the Personal templates and select your saved template!  There are also a ton of online templates available for use which can save you a lot of trouble in creating various types of files.
  3. CaptureScreenshot Tool:  Microsoft has made it so easy now to integrate screenshots or clippings in your document.  Click on Insert—Screenshot and you’ll see the available windows in the gallery.  Simply click on the image and it will automatically be inserted into your document.  From there, you can crop, recolor etc using all of the Microsoft Word picture tools.  If you don’t want the entire window copied but only a small portion, choose the screen clipping tool and simply highlight the area you wish to copy.

To Be Continued…

No More Clunky Documents

Whether you are working on a thesis or a project report, any lengthy document can be cumbersome to work with.  Two new enhancements to Word 2013 that I really find useful are the ability to expand and collapse headings and to set collapse by default.

New Features in Word 2013When you hover over a heading within your document you’ll see the triangular Expand/Collapse button. You can open or close that heading just by clicking on the button.

Expand_Collapse W2013

To expand or collapse all the headings in your document, right click a heading and choose an option from the Expand/Collapse menu.

 

If you want, you also have the ability to set the default to open in a collapsed mode. Once you have your cursor placed in a heading, navigate to the Home tab. In the Paragraph section select the Paragraph Settings button (#1).  Then, select the Collapsed by default option (#2) and click OKparagraph dialog boxViola! You should now have a document that is much easier to work with and looks something like the example below.

CollapsedIf you would like a tour of Office 2013 and learn a few shortcuts like these, come join my webinar on Sept 26 or Oct 30.

 

 

Simple Markup: Easy on the Eyes

Recently I’ve been exploring some of the new features in Office 2013. While there doesn’t seem to be a whole lot of major upgrades to the Office Suite, there are a few changes that I really do like. One thing in particular is the Simple Markup enhancement to the Track Changes feature in Word.

If you’ve previously used Track Changes, you know that just opening your document can cause stress, let alone try to collaborate easily in it.

Here’s a snapshot of a document I recently worked on in Word 2010.  And, boy is that red text seriously making my blood pressure rise!Markup Capture

Take a look at the same document in 2013. I can actually read it easily when I first open it. If I want to dig in deeper and look at what was changed, I can. The document still opens with Track Changes on but by default will display in the Simple Markup view. Changes that were previously made are indicated by the red bars on the left. If you click on a bar, you’ll still see the markup. This new format definitely makes it much easier on the eye.2013 track changes

This is just one of a variety of new features I’ve been toying with.  If you’d be interested in taking a tour of what’s new in Office 2013, consider joining me in one of my upcoming webinars, and I’ll show you a whole lot more!