Enhancing Your Presentations with PowerPoint & Sway

Enhancing Your Presentations through PowerPoint & Sway

Students,

Could your presentations use a little more pizazz? Join us for this special 1-hour webinar full of tips, tricks, and practical guidelines for any PowerPoint presentation. If you are thinking of using PowerPoint for any of your classes, this webinar will be worth your time.

During this hour, we will also introduce you to Sway, Microsoft’s storytelling application, designed for creating presentations, newsletters, and interactive reports. Learn how to access Sway and create quality presentations effortlessly. (1 hr)

Date: Tuesday, March 21, 1:00 p.m.
Cost: FREE

Register 

A-LEC and OIT Team Up for Student Workshops

Excel@Excel Training in the A-LEC
Photo: Rebecca Umobong

Get your spring semester off to a great start! The Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center (A-LEC) has partnered with OIT to offer student workshops that can help you make the best of your spring. Located in the Loyd All-Sports Center, the A-LEC is a great place to support your studies through your time at SMU. Continue reading A-LEC and OIT Team Up for Student Workshops

Save Your Voice for the Presentation

By: Shayan Gaziani

PPT Blog Post Image 2

Imagine this Scenario:

You walk into class prepared to deliver a paramount presentation. You’ve spent hours rehearsing every aspect from timing to delivery. You’ve spent days, if not weeks, preparing the file, compiling countless amounts of slides, graphics, links, and embedded objects.

Approaching the classroom computer, you plug in your thumb drive and open the presentation file. You steady yourself, take a gulp of air, start the presenter view and – notice that every single piece of image, audio, and video is gone. Blank. Nada.

Arguably one of the most venerated of presentation software, Microsoft’s PowerPoint provides a robust, feature-rich, and professional aid to presenters across a variety of disciplines and environments. From the boardroom to the classroom, PowerPoint has proven its usefulness and importance as a de facto method to revolutionizing the way we deliver speeches, presentations, assignments, etc.

But what if it doesn’t Work?

One common, yet egregious, issue with PowerPoint, especially in versions pre-dating 2013, is media and custom fonts not displaying correctly when a presentation file is transferred to another computer. The seemingly logical approach is to download images, sounds, and videos to your computer and simply insert them into a presentation. When you save and transfer the file, everything should clone and transfer as is, right?

Not exactly.

PowerPoint is big on trying to keep file sizes small and compressed, and one of the ways it does that is by linking media objects in a presentation. Remember that video you inserted into PowerPoint? It’s not really in the presentation file – rather a link to it is that PowerPoint then pulls when presenting.

Fortunately, there is an easy fix to this. Most PowerPoint versions include an option called Package for CD (On Mac, the issue can be circumvented by simply saving as a PowerPoint Show [.ppsx] format – you won’t get the viewer mentioned below, though). The feature allows the creator to compile all of the resources that PowerPoint has used to create the presentation (including your media), and create a packaged folder, including a mobile version of PowerPoint, called PowerPoint viewer, to ensure your presentation can run on a computer that does not have PowerPoint Installed. The Package for CD option allows you to create a presentation CD, or simply save the packaged files on a drive.

The Fix.

The steps to accomplish this are fairly simple, as provided by Microsoft. Go ahead and give it a try – it may just save your grade.

What to Do when PowerPoint’s Presenter View Won’t Play Nice

The Presenter View option allows PowerPoint users to show the audience the slide show while giving the presenter a view of upcoming slides, a timer, notes to yourself, and other handy tools. (If you haven’t yet, be sure to give it a try.)

powerpoint-2013-presenter-view

The problem is that every now and then Presenter View doesn’t happen, and the laptop screen only shows the slides. Most people don’t memorize where these controls are, so in this situation users are often forced to press on without the use of Presenter View. Since this little headache pops up from time to time, it pays to know how to set this option.

For Windows PC Users:use presenter view At the top of the PowerPoint screen are a series of tabs. Click on the one that says Slide Show. In the ribbon’s Monitors section, you will see a check box next to the words Use Presenter View. Check this box and Presenter View will start up when you begin the slideshow.

ppt2011-presenter-viewMac Users: Click on the Slide Show tab and look for a section titled Setting for Two Displays. Click on the icon that says Presenter View, and then start your presentation again.

Mac users may also need to be sure that their laptop is not set to mirror the displays. To do this, click on the Apple icon in the top-left of the desktop, then click on System and choose Display. Click on the Arrangement tab at the top of that screen and be sure that the check box next to Mirror Displays is unchecked.

swap screens ppt2013Lastly, if the Presenter View shows up on the wrong monitor simply click on the Display Settings button at the top of the Presenter Tools page and select Swap Presenter View and Slide Show.

Of course, Classroom Support is always available to help with this. Call us at 214-768-8888, and we’ll be glad to set it up for you.

O365 for SMU Students

sc1_tip1_headerA better way to work for SMU students

With Office 365, you can read, write, collaborate, and present ideas—from virtually anywhere with consistent, clean, and fast experiences.

Simplify sharingcsc-sc1-tip1_photo1_@2x

Your files are saved online, so you can send everyone a link to the file where updates can be made together, at the same time.

Learn more

csc-sc1-tip1_photo2_@2xZoom in with PowerPoint

Direct your audience’s attention right to your point in your PowerPoint presentation. Zoom in on a diagram, chart, or graphic with a couple of clicks, and zoom out just as smoothly.

Learn more   

csc-sc1-tip1_photo3_@2xA PDF time-saver you’ll love

Open a PDF in Word on your desktop, and you can edit content as if you created it in Word.

Learn more   

Capturing Screenshots in Office

To follow along with last week’s post we wanted to give you a few tips on using screenshots in the Microsoft Suite.

From the Insert tab (available in all of the Office products), select the Screenshot screenshoticon.  Microsoft gives you two options you can use to insert an image. Click on the drop down arrow and either select Available Window, which gives you the option to insert another window into your document like in the example below: blog screenshot

screen clippingOr, you can insert a Screen Clipping, which allows you to select the specific item you want to insert. First, click on the window you want to grab the screenshot from to make the window active. Next, go back to the Office product you want to insert the screenshot into. Select the Screenshot icon and select Screen Clipping, the window that you were previously on will gray out.

The cursor will change to a cross +. Left click and select the area you want to insert. Here, I selected just the clip I wanted.

5 decades
That’s our quick tip of the day.  Happy screen clipping!