A-LEC and OIT Team Up for Student Workshops

Excel@Excel Training in the A-LEC
Photo: Rebecca Umobong

Get your spring semester off to a great start! The Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center (A-LEC) has partnered with OIT to offer student workshops that can help you make the best of your spring. Located in the Loyd All-Sports Center, the A-LEC is a great place to support your studies through your time at SMU. Continue reading A-LEC and OIT Team Up for Student Workshops

Upcoming Student Technology Training

One Click Learning
Planning for this fall’s student technology workshops has been underway for several months now. This semester, our continued partnership with the Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center (A-LEC) will be expanded with several new course offerings as part of their Learning Strategies Workshop Schedule. One workshop we are particularly excited about is Digital Note-Taking & Textbook Reading. This 2-in-1 workshop will be jointly hosted by members of the A-LEC and IT Training Team. Continue reading Upcoming Student Technology Training

Response to Excel Survey

Microsoft Office ExcelAt the end of February, we sent out a survey to all SMU staff regarding their interest in Excel training. This survey was created as all of our Spring sessions were filled to capacity the same day registration was announced!  We also had a number of staff inquire about attending student-only sessions. However, those sessions were also heavily attended; therefore, we could not meet staff requests for attendance.

In order to accommodate both staff and student requests, we have increased our class offerings. Four additional Excel training sessions will be offered this fall for students. Eleven Excel sessions will be delivered this spring marketed primarily to SMU Staff. Visit our website to register for one of the newly added Excel sessions. Continue reading Response to Excel Survey

Excel for Windows Tips and Shortcuts Webinar

Boosting Your Efficiency and Productivity

Offered by Lynda.com

lynda webinar

Explore Microsoft Excel tips and shortcuts you can use every day on a Windows operating system. Join Dennis Taylor, spreadsheets expert and lynda.com author, to unlock techniques for navigating, copying and pasting, writing formulas, entering data, creating charts, and formatting.

This webinar will discuss:

  • Keystroke combinations
  • Toolbar and menu options
  • Cells, columns, rows
  • And more
  • Q&A session to follow.

All registrants are provided with a recording of the webinar and the slide deck after the event.

Register Now 

Webinar details:

  • Thursday, May 21, 2015
  • 11 a.m. to noon PT 
  • 2 to 3 p.m. ET
  • FREE

 

Speaker: Dennis TaylorDennis Taylor

Dennis Taylor has more than 25 years of experience working with spreadsheet programs as a book and tutorial author, speaker, seminar leader, and facilitator. Since the mid-1990s, he has been the author or instructor of numerous Excel video and online courses, and has traveled throughout the US and Canada presenting more than 300 seminars and classes.

Dennis has written and co-authored multiple books on spreadsheet software, and has presented more than 500 Excel webinars. He has worked with hundreds of corporations, government agencies, colleges, and universities. He lives in Boulder, Colorado.

4 easy steps to keep the leading zero in Excel!

When working on spreadsheets you might have a need to have a column that has leading zeros. For example, let’s use an ID number, if I was to input the beginning of my id “0010” Excel would automatically remove the first two zeros.  Here’s how to keep the leading zero in Excel:

  1. Right click on the column you want the leading zero, select Format Cells
  2. Select Custom from the category list
  3. In the Type field, enter how many digits you need. The SMU ID is 8 digits which we will use in our example below.  (Note: You do not need to add quotes to the string.)

Format Cells

4. Click OK. The column will now utilize the format you created!

ID number

 

Tips for Using Excel in Office 365

sc1_tip2_headerLet your data tell a story

With Office 365 you can easily tell the story of your data. Perform complex tasks quickly, visualize your data to understand it better, and share your workbooks for better results.

csc-sc1-tip2_photo1_@2xAnalyze your data instantly

Discover and compare different ways to represent your data visually then apply formatting, sparklines, charts, and tables with a single click.

Learn more

csc-sc1-tip2_photo2_@2xGet a better picture of your data

Let Excel recommended the charts that best illustrate your data’s patterns. Quickly preview your chart and graph options, then pick the ones that present your insights most clearly.

Learn more

csc-sc1-tip2_photo3_@2xLet Excel work for you

Save time as Excel learns your pattern and auto-completes remaining data. No formulas or macros required.

Learn more

For more information on Office 365 at SMU, please visit our webpage http://www.smu.edu/BusinessFinance/OIT/Services/o365.

Capturing Screenshots in Office

To follow along with last week’s post we wanted to give you a few tips on using screenshots in the Microsoft Suite.

From the Insert tab (available in all of the Office products), select the Screenshot screenshoticon.  Microsoft gives you two options you can use to insert an image. Click on the drop down arrow and either select Available Window, which gives you the option to insert another window into your document like in the example below: blog screenshot

screen clippingOr, you can insert a Screen Clipping, which allows you to select the specific item you want to insert. First, click on the window you want to grab the screenshot from to make the window active. Next, go back to the Office product you want to insert the screenshot into. Select the Screenshot icon and select Screen Clipping, the window that you were previously on will gray out.

The cursor will change to a cross +. Left click and select the area you want to insert. Here, I selected just the clip I wanted.

5 decades
That’s our quick tip of the day.  Happy screen clipping!

 

 

What’s behind the Excel Design tab? 5 tips worth knowing.

If you’ve been working with Excel for a while, my guess is that you are probably somewhat familiar with the basics of converting your data into a table. However, you may not be aware of some of the features behind the Design tab.  The Design tab will display anytime you click in a table.Design tab

Here are 5 handy tips worth knowing.  I will review them from right to left.

  1. When you click on the drop down in the Table styles options you’ll see an assortment of Table Styles available to suit your preferences.
  2. If there is a table style you like and you want to add additional customization you can do so by selecting a feature in the Table Style Options section.  I often choose to have items displayed with banded rows (every other row shaded), but sometimes it might be easier on the eye to have banded columns.
  3. total rowSelecting the Total Row not only adds a total line to your table, but it also has built in functions that you can toggle to further analyze specific data.
  4. Did you know you could add a slicer to filter through data?  Select Slicer, next select what column you want to filter.  In my example, I wanted to view specific types of charges, so I chose the account columns to filter.

Account Next,  select the item you want to filter and the results will be displayed.  filter results

5.  Selecting the Remove Duplicates button will allow you to delete duplicate values. You’ll simply need to tell Excel what column you want the duplicates to be removed from. Oh and by the way, if you remove duplicates from the wrong column, don’t forget the handy Ctrl+Z function to undo your last action!

To learn more Excel tips, check out one of my Basic Formula workshops or Rachel Mulry’s Advanced Excel training.

  smu.edu/BusinessFinance/OIT/Training

Pivot Tables in Excel 2013

By: Rajat Shetty

Excel Pivot tables help summarize your data. They also allow you to avoid using complex formulas like Vlookup, SumIF, etc. to create a table. It can take a little while for a newbie to get the hang of Pivot tables. However, the 2013 Excel updates make creating Pivot tables even simpler.

A few years back, we had to follow these steps to create a simple pivot table:

  1. Select the data range
  2. Insert pivot table from the Insert tab
  3. Go to the new worksheet to check if all the fields are appearing or notchart1

4. Manually drag and drop the required fields according to our requirements to calculate-Sum, average, percentage, etc.chart2

chart3

With the new Microsoft Excel-2013, you are just one click away from creating a basic pivot table. The best part is you do not have to drag and drop anything into the field list. As seen to the right, you can pull the exact information you need from a complex spreadsheet without having to go through the above mentioned steps for Excel-2010.

How do you create Pivot tables in 2013?

Instead of inserting a Pivot table from the Insert tab, just click on the “Recommended Pivot Tables” option on the Insert tab.

chart4As you can see in the above image, Excel automatically suggests three or four options for your data range. All you have to do is make sure that your cursor is in one of the data entries on the main sheet before you click on “Recommended Pivot Tables”.

When you select one of the recommended Pivot tables, it automatically adjusts the fields without the user having to drag and drop in the Pivot table field list. Once the Pivot table is created you can customize the fields according to your requirements.

chart5

In summary, we use the following steps to create a Pivot table using Excel-2013:

1. Organize and arrange data in columns
2. Make sure each column has a heading
3. Click on Insert and select the “Recommended Pivot Charts” option
4. Choose the desired Pivot table
5. Sit back and relax

Here’s looking forward to future updates from Microsoft Office. Maybe next time Excel will be even more intuitive.