William Tsutsui

SMU experts share perspectives on 2011 Japan quake in fund-raising lecture April 12

Japan quake relief T-shirt created for SMU fund-raising effortsTwo SMU faculty members with unique perspectives on the Japanese earthquake will speak at a public fund-raising lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, in Room 123, Fondren Science Building. (The location has been changed from its original venue in McCord Auditorium.)

Dedman College Dean William Tsutsui was in Tokyo at the time of the earthquake as a member of the Japanese American Leadership Delegation. He will be joined by Brian Stump, Albritton Professor of Geological Sciences in Dedman College, a recognized seismology expert who leads a national university consortium funded by the National Science Foundation and works with the U.S. Geological Survey to manage global earthquake data.

Admission to the lecture is $10; SMU students will be admitted free with campus ID. Proceeds will benefit disaster relief efforts in Japan. RSVP online at the Japan Association at SMU (JASMU) website.

At the event, JASMU will sell a fund-raising T-shirt designed by its members (pictured right), priced at $20. The shirt features images of a crane and Mt. Fuji, both symbols of Japan, with a large wave symbolizing the recent disaster. “We hope that Japanese people will find a way to recover from the 2011 Japan earthquake just like cranes rising into the sun,” the students wrote on the JASMU homepage.

Half Price Books donated the assistance of its design team and covered the cost of the T-shirts and production, ensuring that all money raised through the T-shirts can go directly to relief efforts in Japan. The money will be given to the American Red Cross through SMU’s Institute for the Study of Earth and Man (ISEM).

The shirts will also be available from SMU’s booth at the 2011 Earth Day Dallas event, April 22-23 in the Dallas Arts District.

For more information, visit the Japanese Association at SMU website or call Yuri Kimura at 214-909-0786.

Faculty in the News: March 29, 2011

SMU Professor Seyom BrownWilliam Tsutsui, Dean, Dedman College, was in Japan when the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami devastated the country. He wrote about how the Japanese people’s fascination with disaster in movies, manga, anime and video games mirrors that nation’s real-world vulnerability to catastrophe in an essay that appeared in Newsweek March 24, 2011.

Seyom Brown (right), Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, discussed the current crisis in Libya with FOX 4 News March 24, 2011. Watch the Seyom Brown interview online. video

Raúl Magdaleno, Diversity and Community Engagement, Meadows School of the Arts, finished his SMU bachelor’s degree while living in a homeless shelter and caring for family members. He discussed his experiences with Bill Zeeble of KERA Public Radio March 24, 2011. Listen to Magdeleno’s KERA radio interview. audio

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the competing views of how President Obama is handling the crisis in the Middle East with with The Canadian Press March 21, 2011. He also talked about the political ramifications of a joint appearance of former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and President Obama for an article that appeared in The Christian Science Monitor March 2, 2011.

Ryszard Stroynowski, Physics, Dedman College, was featured in a story on how the legacy of North Texas’ Superconducting Super Collider has continued at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. The story was aired by WFAA Channel 8 News March 22, 2011. Watch the Stroynowski interview at the SMU Research blog. video

R. Gerald Turner, SMU president and co-chair of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, provided commentary to Bloomberg News on a report that says the NCAA should alter its payouts for the men’s basketball tournament to reward schools with higher graduation rates. The article appeared March 17, 2011.

Yolette Garcia, Assistant Dean for External Affairs and Outreach, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, provided expertise for a story on how the way words are pronounced may be changing as the state’s demographics change. The article appeared in The Texas Observer March 1, 2011.

George Holden, Psychology, Dedman College, talked about how to handle mature questions from young children, especially when they are taking a very literal approach to a concern, with columnist Tyra Damm of The Dallas Morning News Jan. 7, 2011.

SMU community raises funds for Japan earthquake and tsunami victims

Japan quake relief T-shirt created for SMU fund-raising effortsThe Japanese Association at Southern Methodist University (JASMU) will raise funds for victims of the Japan earthquake and tsunami through an upcoming lecture and T-shirt sales.

The newly formed organization is led by Yuri Kimura, a Ph.D. candidate in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences; Noritoshi Hiyama, who is pursuing an M.B.A. in the Cox School of Business; and Isaac Saito, who is pursuing an M.S. in systems engineering in Lyle School of Engineering.

“We hated seeing what was happening in our country, and we wanted to do something to help as quickly as possible,” Kimura says. “We hope others on the SMU campus and around Dallas will join us in our quest to raise funds for those in need in Japan.”

Two SMU faculty members with unique perspectives on the Japanese earthquake will speak at a public fund-raising lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, in Room 123, Fondren Science Building.

Dedman College Dean William Tsutsui was in Tokyo at the time of the earthquake as a member of the Japanese American Leadership Delegation. He will be joined by Brian Stump, Albritton Professor of Geological Sciences in Dedman College, a recognized seismology expert who leads a national university consortium funded by the National Science Foundation and works with the U.S. Geological Survey to manage global earthquake data.

Admission to the lecture is $10; SMU students will be admitted free with campus ID. Proceeds will benefit disaster relief efforts in Japan. RSVP online at the JASMU website.

In addition, JASMU will sell a fund-raising T-shirt designed by its members, priced at $20. The shirt features images of a crane and Mt. Fuji, both symbols of Japan, with a large wave symbolizing the recent disaster. “We hope that Japanese people will find a way to recover from the 2011 Japan earthquake just like cranes rising into the sun,” the students write on the JASMU homepage.

Half Price Books donated the assistance of its design team and covered the cost of the T-shirts and production, ensuring that all money raised through the T-shirts can go directly to relief efforts in Japan. The money will be given to the American Red Cross through SMU’s Institute for the Study of Earth and Man (ISEM).

The SMU community can buy the T-shirts for the first time during the Cox School of Business 7th Annual International Festival. Sales will take place 5:30-8:30 p.m. March 25 in the James M. Collins Executive Education Center.

Additional shirt sales will take place March 28, 29 and 31, and on April 1 and 8 from 11 a.m. to noon at the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. The shirts will go on sale from 2-6 p.m. April 9-10 at the Half Price Books Dallas flagship store, 5803 East Northwest Highway.

The shirts will also be available at the April 12 campus lecture and from SMU’s booth at the Earth Day Dallas event, April 22-23 in the Dallas Arts District.

For more information on the upcoming events, visit the Japanese Association at SMU website, or call Yuri Kimura at 214-909-0786.

Written by Christina Voss

Tune In: Dean Tsutsui’s Japan chronicle

UPDATED Friday, March 11, 2011: Dean Tsutsui is blogging from Tokyo about today’s tsunami and earthquake. Visit this link to read his updates.

> FOX 4 News video: SMU Dean Tsutsui Caught In Japan Quake video

The 2011 Japanese American Leadership Delegation in KyotoDedman College Dean William Tsutsui is visiting Japan as a member of the Japanese American Leadership Delegation (JALD). Sponsored by Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership, JALD seeks to engage Japanese American leaders in furthering relations between the United States and Japan. The 13-person delegation will visit Kyoto, Osaka and Tokyo, and will meet with high-level Japanese leaders in government, business and education.

Dean Tsutsui’s visit ends March 12 – until then, experience the sights, sounds and culture of Japan through his eyes via his SMU Adventures blog.

(Right, the 2011 Japanese American Leadership Delegation in Kyoto.)

> Read more about JALD from SMU News
> Find more adventurous reading at SMU Adventures

Dean Tsutsui named to Japanese American Leadership Delegation

William TsutsuiWilliam Tsutsui, dean of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, is one of 13 Japanese American leaders from across the nation selected to join the 2011 Japanese American Leadership Delegation (JALD).

The delegation, led by U.S.-Japan Council President Irene Hirano Inouye, will travel to Japan March 4-12 to meet and exchange information with the highest level of Japanese leaders in the government, business, and cultural sectors. In previous years, the delegation has met with the Prime Minister, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Director-General of Japan’s Foreign Ministry, economic entities such as Keizai Doyukai and Keidanren, and Her Imperial Highness Princess Takamado.

The trip allows Japanese leaders to gain a greater understanding of multicultural America through the experiences of a diverse group of Japanese Americans.

Upon returning to the United States, delegation members work with former delegates, local Consulates, the U.S.-Japan Council and local and national community organizations to organize and participate in programs and activities related to building U.S.-Japan relations.

“Participation in the JALD could help me focus the energy and commitment that I bring to increasing American understanding of Japan and offer me a structured way of fusing my personal heritage with my professional objectives,” said Tsutsui. “I see the JALD as an exceptional opportunity for me to better engage with the Japanese American community, build upon my past work in advancing American-Japanese interactions, and become a more effective advocate and leader in U.S.-Japan relations locally, regionally, and nationally.”

Because of his background and expertise in education, Tsutsui will represent the delegation by speaking at a symposium in Osaka held in conjunction with the delegation trip to Japan. The symposium will focus on education, specifically study abroad and language.

In addition to serving as dean, Tsutsui is a professor of history. His academic work has focused on 20th-century U.S.-Japan relations. He has written several books exploring the postwar Japanese financial system, the American influence on Japanese factory management, and the globalization of Japanese pop culture (particularly the Godzilla film series).

> Read more from SMU News

By | 2011-02-15T10:36:24+00:00 February 15, 2011|Categories: News|Tags: , , , |

Faculty in the News: Oct. 27, 2010

William Tsutsui with GodzillaCal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about campaign spending and the race for Texas governor with The Abilene Reporter News Oct. 23, 2010. He also discussed politics swirling around the issue of candidates’ income tax returns with The Houston Chronicle Oct. 20, 2010, and discussed the steps Bill White and Rick Perry need to take to win with The San Antonio Express News Oct. 24, 2010.

Maria Minniti, entrepreneurship, Cox School of Business, talked about the trend of military veterans starting their own businesses with The Fort Worth Star-Telegram Oct. 24, 2010.

William Tsutsui (right), Dean, Dedman College, and his interest in Godzilla as a cultural ambassador for postwar Japan were the subject of a profile published in The Dallas Morning News Oct. 24, 2010. (Photo by Tom Fox of the DMN.)

William Tsutsui to speak at Faculty Club event Sept. 22

William TsutsuiDedman College Dean William Tsutsui will speak at the first Faculty Club Distinguished Luncheon of the 2010-11 academic year. Tsutsui will discuss “So, What Are You Working On?” at the luncheon, which begins at noon Sept. 22 in the Ernst & Young Gallery, Fincher Building, Cox School of Business.

The location has been moved to the Gallery to accommodate additional reservations. The Faculty Club will accept RSVPs until 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 20.

The price is $12 for Faculty Club members, $15 for non-members. To RSVP, contact Dee Powell, 214-768-3012.

> Visit the SMU Faculty Club online

By | 2010-09-20T12:11:57+00:00 September 20, 2010|Categories: Calendar Highlights, News|Tags: , , |

School year starts with new and old traditions

Dedman College Dean William Tsutsui speaks at SMU's Opening Convocation 2010SMU welcomed 1,478 new students to the class of 2014 in August. The students come from 44 states and 36 countries, including China, India, Russia and Spain.

“As you will all find in the coming weeks, months and years, education comes in unexpected places, at unexpected times and in unexpected ways when you are in college and, indeed, throughout your life,” said William Tsutsui (right), dean of Dedman College, in his Opening Convocation address. “You never know when something great is going to happen. So be ready: Unexpected and wonderful things lie just ahead for all of you.”

> Read the full text of Dean Tsutsui’s Convocation address under the cut

(more…)

Calendar Highlights: Back-to-School 2010

Lining up the flags for Opening Convocation 2009New students arrive on the Hilltop for Mustang Corral Aug. 18, and the entire campus is gearing up for the Fall 2010 semester. Keep track of some important dates and times with this handy back-to-school calendar:

> Visit the SMU calendar to find more upcoming events
> Learn how to submit calendar events

Economic historian is new dean of Dedman College

William M. TsutsuiThe new dean of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences is a specialist in modern Japanese business and economic history whose books examine topics ranging from banking policy to the film icon Godzilla.

William M. Tsutsui joins SMU on July 1, 2010, from the University of Kansas, where he is associate dean for international studies in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and professor of history. Tsutsui also is director of the Kansas Consortium for Teaching About Asia in KU’s Center for East Asian Studies.

“Dr. Tsutsui is a nationally recognized scholar and dedicated teacher who will bring incredible energy and expertise to the college at a time when it is poised to make great advances,” said Paul Ludden, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs.

“Dedman College is the heart of an SMU education, and Dr. Tsutsui is well equipped to lead its diverse and distinguished programs,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “He will help set the strategic course for the college and strengthen its impact on our region and broader community. We welcome him to the University family.”

“I am honored and thrilled to have been selected as dean of Dedman College,” Tsutsui said. “The College has a world-class faculty, talented students, dedicated staff and a broad base of support in the Dallas community. I look forward to working with all these constituencies, and with President Turner and Provost Ludden, to enhance Dedman College’s achievements in teaching, research, and public engagement. This is a historic moment for SMU, with a major campaign underway and the university’s centennial at hand, and a time of great opportunity for Dedman College.”

Tsutsui received a Ph.D. in history at Princeton University in 1995, and a Master of Arts in history there in 1990. He received a Master of Letters in Modern Japanese History from Oxford University’s Corpus Christi College in 1988 and graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University with a Bachelor of Arts in East Asian Studies in 1985.

'Godzilla On My Mind' book coverTsutsui is the author of Banking Policy in Japan: American Efforts at Reform During the Occupation (Routledge, 1988); Manufacturing Ideology: Scientific Management in Twentieth-Century Japan (Princeton University Press, 1998); and Godzilla on My Mind: Fifty Years of the King of Monsters (Palgrave, 2004). He is the editor of Banking in Japan (Routledge, 1999); A Companion to Japanese History (Blackwell, 2007); and (with Michiko Ito) In Godzilla’s Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture Icons on the Global Stage (Palgrave, 2006).

He received the 1997 Newcomen Society Award for Excellence in Business History Research and Writing, the 2000 John Whitney Hall Prize awarded by the Association of Asian Studies for best book on Japan or Korea published in 1998, and the 2005 William Rockhill Nelson Award for non-fiction.

Before assuming his current duties at KU, Tsutsui was acting director of the university’s Center for East Asian Studies and executive director of its Confucius Institute. He has been named faculty fellow at KU’s Center for Teaching Excellence, received a William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence in 2001 and won KU’s Steeples Service to Kansas Award in 2001.

Tsutsui is married to Marjorie Swann, director of the Museum Studies Program and the Conger-Gabel Teaching Professor in the Department of English at the University of Kansas. She will be joining SMU as well.

William B. Lawrence, dean of the Perkins School of Theology and search committee chair, said, “We have been tremendously impressed with Dr. Tsutsui’s energy, vision, appreciation for the gifted faculty in the college, the breadth as well as the depth of his intellect, his respect for the staff, and his spirit of collegiality. The search committee enthusiastically recommended Dr. Tsutsui to the provost, and I look forward to working with him as a fellow dean.”

Provost Ludden also expressed thanks to Peter Moore, chair of SMU’s Department of Mathematics and Dedman College’s associate dean for academic affairs, for serving as interim dean during the search. “Dr. Moore has done an outstanding job of stewarding the college for the past year,” Ludden said.

As Dedman College dean, Tsutsui will take the lead in implementing the new University Curriculum program passed by the SMU faculty March 19. About 40 percent of SMU’s undergraduates pursue their majors in Dedman College.

> Visit Dedman College on the web

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