William Lawrence

Faculty in the News: April 19, 2011

Jean-Paul Comelin, Distinguished Visiting Artist in Residence in Dance, Meadows School of the Arts, was the subject of an interview on how dance brings art and love to stage that was published in KERA’s Art&Seek March 31, 2011.

Jeff Bellin, Dedman School of Law, talked about a court ruling that could make it easier for victims of child pornography around the country to get restitution for an article published by The Associated Press March 25, 2011.

Jim Hollifield, Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, participated in a panel discussion on the future of religion, medicine, media, and world power at the Festival of Ideas, organized by the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture. He was featured in a story on the festival that appeared in Pegasus News March 27, 2011.

William Lawrence, Dean, Perkins School of Theology, and Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about whether legal disputes involving churches and other religious institutions are constitutionally different from those involving their secular counterparts in a “Texas Faith” blog post for The Dallas Morning News April 5, 2011.

Bud Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, talked about job gains and the economic outlook for Texas with The Dallas Morning News April 1, 2011. In addition, he discussed with The Weather Channel how Japan’s April 7 aftershock will affect the world economy in a segment that aired April 7, 2011. video

Hiroki Takeuchi, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about Japan’s aging population and its lack of preparation for retirement with The Dallas Morning News April 2, 2011.

Bruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, discussed rising fuel costs and their effect on food prices with The San Marcos Daily Record April 7, 2011.

Mike Davis, Finance, Cox School of Business, talked about whether Dish Network’s purchase of Blockbuster would mean layoffs with the Star Newspapers April 8, 2011.

Bill Dorsaneo, Dedman School of Law, discussed a U.S. district court judge’s reversal of a $625.5 million jury decision against Apple Inc. with The Tyler Telegram April 6, 2011.

Faculty in the News: Feb. 8, 2011

Meadows MuseumJosé Bowen, Dean, Meadows School of the Arts, talked about places he finds special in Dallas for an article that appeared in The Wall Street Journal Feb. 5, 2011.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about demographic changes in Texas and how they will affect the political landscape with The Dallas Morning News Jan. 29, 2011. He also discussed Republicans and Democrats sitting side by side at President Obama’s 2011 State of the Union address with The Fort Worth Star-Telegram Jan. 23, 2011.

Jillson provided expertise for an article on Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s political tactics in identifying certain pieces of legislation as emergency items for an article that appeared in The Houston Chronicle Jan. 24, 2011. He also spoke with the Chronicle for a Jan. 10, 2011 story about the attention Texas will draw because of its political redness and the governor’s promise not to raise taxes.

Linda Eads, Dedman School of Law, wrote about why Texas lawyers should vote for the disciplinary rule referendum in a piece published by Texas Lawyer Jan. 24, 2011.

D. Aaron Lacy, Dedman School of Law, provided expertise for a Texas Cable News (TXCN) story on a lawsuit filed by a woman who was fired for taking time off work to vote. The story aired Jan. 18, 2011.

Michael Cox, O’Neil Center For Global Markets and Freedom, Cox School of Business, talked about how Americans may be better off economically than we realize for a U.S. News & World Report article published Jan. 20, 2011.

Bud Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business wrote about how the United States can reduce its oil imports by developing natural gas that’s locked in shale formations in an article published in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Jan. 26, 2011. He also discussed the mixed North Texas economic outlook with The Dallas Business Journal Jan. 11, 2011.

Karen Thomas, Journalism, Meadows School of the Arts, wrote about the effect of her mother’s Alzheimer’s disease on her family members’ relationships with each other in a story published in The Dallas Morning News Jan. 18, 2011.

Willard Spiegelman, English, Dedman College, wrote about the Salvator Rosa exhibit at Fort Worth’s Kimbell Museum for the Jan. 20, 2011 edition of The Wall Street Journal

Bruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, talked about the White House oil spill commission’s call for a dramatic overhaul of the way the United States regulates offshore drilling in an article published by Reuters. It appeared in the Jan. 11, 2011 edition of The Calgary Herald and numerous other publications.

William Lawrence, Dean, Perkins School of Theology, and Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about why some religious denominations produce more political leaders in The Dallas Morning News‘s Texas Faith blog Jan. 18, 2011.

Faculty in the News: Winter Break 2010-11

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about the how the new census will affect Texas politically – and the risks it may pose for Republicans – with The Los Angeles Times Dec. 22, 2010, and with The Fort Worth Star-Telegram Dec. 20, 2010. He talked about the year ahead in politics with The Canadian Press Dec. 16, 2010. In addition, he discussed the likelihood of New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg running for president in 2012 with The Christian Science Monitor Dec. 13, 2010.

Willard Spiegelman, English, Dedman College, wrote about the Interfaith Peace Chapel of Dallas – the last building architect Philip Johnson designed before his death – in a piece that appeared in The Wall Street Journal Dec. 22, 2010.

Dan Howard, Marketing, Cox School of Business, talked about how creative gift-giving increases when the economy is bad with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Dec. 20, 2010.

Mike Davis, Finance, Cox School of Business, discussed the rise in Texas’ unemployment rate – despite a gain in jobs – with The Dallas Morning News Dec. 17, 2010.

Sharon Lyle, project director, TEDxSMU, was profiled as “the top conversation starter in Dallas” in D Magazine‘s “The 20 Things You Need to Know For 2011.” The article appeared Dec. 15, 2010.

Dalia AbdelHady, Sociology, Dedman College, talked about crafting holiday traditions when members of a family are of different faiths with KERA Public Radio Dec. 16, 2010. audio

Rhonda Rompola, head coach, Women’s Basketball, was the subject of a “Profile in Fitness” Q&A with The Dallas Morning News Dec. 14, 2010.

Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, and William Lawrence, dean of SMU’s Perkins School of Theology, talked about Americans’ depth of religious knowledge and how religion shapes our political views in the “Texas Faith” column of The Dallas Morning News Dec. 14, 2010.

Lawrence also talked about the Nativity story and who was present for the birth of Jesus with National Public Radio News Dec. 23, 2010. audio

Raúl Magdaleno, director of diversity and community engagement, Meadows School of the Arts, was the subject of a profile in The Dallas Morning News Dec. 13, 2010.

Faculty in the News: Dec. 14, 2010

Al Niemi, Dean, Cox School of Business, and Cox faculty members discussed how unemployment and the lack of job creation could make 2011 a worse economic year than 2010 in an article that appeared in The Dallas Business Journal Dec. 9, 2010.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked with The Calgary Herald about the political implications of establishment Republicans’ recent questioning of Sarah Palin’s fitness for elected office. The article appeared in the paper’s Dec. 4, 2010 edition. He also talked with The Houston Chronicle about Texas Governor Rick Perry’s plans to take his anti-Washington message national as the new chairman of the Republican Governors Association. The story was published Dec. 5, 2010.

William Lawrence, Dean, Perkins School of Theology, talked about how fear can be supplanted by hope in a commentary for KERA 90.1 FM public radio that aired Dec. 8, 2010. Listen to Lawrence’s KERA broadcast here. audio

In addition, Lawrence discussed whether a Dallas-based website identifying businesses as “naughty” for not acknowledging Christmas is inappropriate for the season with The Dallas Morning News Dec. 8, 2010. He also wrote about the moral argument in favor of the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act for the DMN’s “Texas Faith” column.

Nathan Cortez, SMU Dedman School of LawBud Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, discussed with The Dallas Morning News the possible effects on Texas if Congress votes to let Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthy expire. The article appeared in the Dec. 2, 2010 edition.

Michael Cox, O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom, Cox School of Business, provided expertise for a Steve Blow column about what it means to call Texas “business friendly.” The piece ran in The Dallas Morning News Dec. 2, 2010.

Nathan Cortez (right), Dedman School of Law, talked with CBS 11 News about the battle between BlueCross BlueShield and Texas Health Resources that was precipitated by new requirements on insurers in the new health care law. The segment aired Dec. 2, 2010. Watch CBS 11 reporter Jack Fink’s story here. video

Alyce McKenzie promoted to LeVan Endowed Chair of Preaching and Worship

Alyce McKenzieAlyce McKenzie, professor of homiletics in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology, will be named to the seminary’s George W. and Nell Ayers LeVan Endowed Chair of Preaching and Worship. The appointment becomes effective in June 2011, following the retirement of the current LeVan Chair, Marjorie Procter-Smith.

I”The appointment of a faculty member at SMU to an endowed chair signals that the individual has attained the highest levels of accomplishment in scholarship and teaching. Alyce McKenzie is a tremendously accomplished scholar with a vast array of publications in Biblical studies and in preaching, and she is remarkably respected for her teaching within and beyond the University,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden in announcing the appointment.

“Alyce combines in her career both professional experience as a pastor in the church and academic accomplishments as a scholar. She is among the leading Biblical interpreters of wisdom literature. And she is one of the most widely sought preachers at conferences of persons in ministry,” added Perkins Dean William Lawrence.

McKenzie, an ordained minister in The United Methodist Church, joined the SMU faculty in 1999 after teaching at Princeton Theological Seminary. She was also the pastor of United Methodist churches in eastern and central Pennsylvania. Currently, she is a clergy member in the North Texas Annual Conference and serves on its Board of Ordained Ministry.

As a scholar, she is one of the nation’s most widely recognized authorities on the wisdom tradition in the Bible, particularly as expressed in preaching. Her current research involves the creative process of preparing and delivering sermons. Her newest book, Novel Preaching: Tips From Top Writers on Crafting Creative Sermons, examines the generative work that moves from images, ideas and texts toward the proclaimed message.

McKenzie earned her Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary after receiving a Bachelor’s degree in religious studies from Bryn Mawr College and a Master of Divinity from Duke University Divinity School. She has been a leader in both academic and ecclesiastical circles regarding preaching. Her contributions have included conferences focused on the professional development of ministers, publications addressing scholarly issues in the guild of homileticians, and programs of theological education for laity.

In 2001, McKenzie was selected as a Lilly Faculty Fellow by the Association of Theological Schools and received a grant through the Lilly Endowment Inc. In 2010, she began writing a blog on lectionary preaching that attracts more than 2,000 readers each week. In 2012, she will be president of the Academy of Homiletics.

> Read more from SMU News

Bruce Marshall to take Lehman Chair in Christian Doctrine

Bruce MarshallBruce Marshall, professor of historical theology in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology, will become the School’s next Edward and Emma Lehman Chair in Christian Doctrine. The appointment is effective in June 2011, following the retirement of the current Lehman Chair holder, Charles Wood.

“Naming a faculty member at SMU to an endowed position is recognition that the professor has achieved the highest levels of accomplishment in academic life. Bruce Marshall is an outstanding member of the SMU faculty,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden in the announcement. “His work exemplifies the excellence of the University, and he is a most worthy recipient of this distinctive promotion.”

“Bruce epitomizes everything that we affirm in our mission statement as a school to prepare women and men for faithful leadership in Christian ministry,” said Perkins Dean William Lawrence. “He is a superb and challenging teacher. He is a globally respected scholar. And he contributes great leadership in the education of our Master’s and doctoral students.”

Marshall has been a member of the SMU faculty since 2001. A scholar of the history of Christian theology and doctrine, he is renowned for his work on the doctrine of the Trinity and is an expert on the theology of Thomas Aquinas. He has lectured widely throughout the United States and abroad on topics ranging from Trinitarian theology to Christology to the relationships between Judaism and Christianity.

A graduate of Northwestern University, where he earned his baccalaureate degree in religious studies, Marshall holds three Master’s degrees and a Ph.D. from Yale. He is a member of several distinguished academic guilds, and recently completed a term as president of the Academy of Catholic Theology. He has also served on the boards of five scholarly journals: Nova et Vetera, Modern Theology, Pro Ecclesia, Ecclesiology, and the International Journal for the Study of the Christian Church.

His teaching responsibilities include courses in Christian heritage, the history of Christian doctrine, and Christian thought in the middle ages. In summer 2010, Marshall became director of SMU’s Graduate Program in Religious Studies, which combines the resources of Perkins School of Theology and the department of religious studies in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, for students who pursue the Ph.D. in religious study at SMU.

> Read more from SMU News

Faculty in the News: Sept. 14, 2010

Fred WendorfWilliam Lawrence, Dean, Perkins School of Theology, talked about American attitudes toward the Muslim faith with The Dallas Morning News Sept. 11, 2010. In addition, he provided expertise for an article on the United Methodist Church’s recent membership survey in The New York Times Sept. 1, 2010.

Fred Wendorf (left), Henderson-Morrison Professor Emeritus of Prehistory in Dedman College, opened the UNM-Taos/SMU lecture series in Taos, New Mexico, Sept. 8, 2010. He was the subject of a profile in The Taos News on the same day.

Geoffrey Orsak, Dean, Lyle School of Engineering, wrote about the need for innovation in America for Design News. The article was published in the magazine’s August 2010 edition.

Faculty in the News: March 30, 2010

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison’s political future with The Dallas Morning News March 28, 2010. He also discussed the effect of the health care debate on perceptions of abortion as a partisan issue with Reuters March 23, 2010.

William Lawrence, Dean, Perkins School of Theology, and Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, provided expertise for a story on whether government should practice social justice that appeared in The Dallas Morning News March 23, 2010. Lawrence and Wilson are part of the News‘ Texas Faith panel.

Nathan Cortez, Dedman School of Law, and Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the potential for success of a lawsuit challenging the new health care law. Cortez spoke with KERA 90.1 Radio on March 23, 2010. Hear and read the full interview. audio

Meanwhile, Jillson spoke about the law’s constitutionality with CNN March 23, 2010. Read the full story.

Economic historian is new dean of Dedman College

William M. TsutsuiThe new dean of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences is a specialist in modern Japanese business and economic history whose books examine topics ranging from banking policy to the film icon Godzilla.

William M. Tsutsui joins SMU on July 1, 2010, from the University of Kansas, where he is associate dean for international studies in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences and professor of history. Tsutsui also is director of the Kansas Consortium for Teaching About Asia in KU’s Center for East Asian Studies.

“Dr. Tsutsui is a nationally recognized scholar and dedicated teacher who will bring incredible energy and expertise to the college at a time when it is poised to make great advances,” said Paul Ludden, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs.

“Dedman College is the heart of an SMU education, and Dr. Tsutsui is well equipped to lead its diverse and distinguished programs,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “He will help set the strategic course for the college and strengthen its impact on our region and broader community. We welcome him to the University family.”

“I am honored and thrilled to have been selected as dean of Dedman College,” Tsutsui said. “The College has a world-class faculty, talented students, dedicated staff and a broad base of support in the Dallas community. I look forward to working with all these constituencies, and with President Turner and Provost Ludden, to enhance Dedman College’s achievements in teaching, research, and public engagement. This is a historic moment for SMU, with a major campaign underway and the university’s centennial at hand, and a time of great opportunity for Dedman College.”

Tsutsui received a Ph.D. in history at Princeton University in 1995, and a Master of Arts in history there in 1990. He received a Master of Letters in Modern Japanese History from Oxford University’s Corpus Christi College in 1988 and graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University with a Bachelor of Arts in East Asian Studies in 1985.

'Godzilla On My Mind' book coverTsutsui is the author of Banking Policy in Japan: American Efforts at Reform During the Occupation (Routledge, 1988); Manufacturing Ideology: Scientific Management in Twentieth-Century Japan (Princeton University Press, 1998); and Godzilla on My Mind: Fifty Years of the King of Monsters (Palgrave, 2004). He is the editor of Banking in Japan (Routledge, 1999); A Companion to Japanese History (Blackwell, 2007); and (with Michiko Ito) In Godzilla’s Footsteps: Japanese Pop Culture Icons on the Global Stage (Palgrave, 2006).

He received the 1997 Newcomen Society Award for Excellence in Business History Research and Writing, the 2000 John Whitney Hall Prize awarded by the Association of Asian Studies for best book on Japan or Korea published in 1998, and the 2005 William Rockhill Nelson Award for non-fiction.

Before assuming his current duties at KU, Tsutsui was acting director of the university’s Center for East Asian Studies and executive director of its Confucius Institute. He has been named faculty fellow at KU’s Center for Teaching Excellence, received a William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence in 2001 and won KU’s Steeples Service to Kansas Award in 2001.

Tsutsui is married to Marjorie Swann, director of the Museum Studies Program and the Conger-Gabel Teaching Professor in the Department of English at the University of Kansas. She will be joining SMU as well.

William B. Lawrence, dean of the Perkins School of Theology and search committee chair, said, “We have been tremendously impressed with Dr. Tsutsui’s energy, vision, appreciation for the gifted faculty in the college, the breadth as well as the depth of his intellect, his respect for the staff, and his spirit of collegiality. The search committee enthusiastically recommended Dr. Tsutsui to the provost, and I look forward to working with him as a fellow dean.”

Provost Ludden also expressed thanks to Peter Moore, chair of SMU’s Department of Mathematics and Dedman College’s associate dean for academic affairs, for serving as interim dean during the search. “Dr. Moore has done an outstanding job of stewarding the college for the past year,” Ludden said.

As Dedman College dean, Tsutsui will take the lead in implementing the new University Curriculum program passed by the SMU faculty March 19. About 40 percent of SMU’s undergraduates pursue their majors in Dedman College.

> Visit Dedman College on the web

Preaching lab named for Perkins alumnus Cecil Williams

Rev. Dr. A. Cecil WilliamsSMU’s Perkins School of Theology has named the Williams Preaching Lab in Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall in honor of Rev. Dr. A. Cecil Williams (’55, right), Minister of Liberation at Glide Memorial United Methodist Church in San Francisco. The announcement was made by Dean William Lawrence at a reception in honor of Williams and his wife, Janice Mirikitani, in November.

The state-of-the-art preaching lab is designed to support instruction and training in homiletics for present and future clergy.

Williams was in Dallas to receive a 2009 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University. He is a 1996 recipient of the Perkins Distinguished Alumnus Award and received an honorary doctorate from the University in 1997.

As a minister, author, social activist, lecturer, community leader, and spokesperson for the poor and marginalized, Rev. Williams is recognized as a national leader in civil and human rights. He was one of five African American students admitted to Perkins in fall 1952 in what was the first voluntary desegregation of a major educational institution in the South. In 1963 he was appointed to Glide Memorial Methodist, a church of fewer than 50 members in a declining section of San Francisco.

Today Glide has a membership of more than 11,000, representing a multitude of races, ethnic backgrounds, cultures, social classes and ages. The church has earned accolades for its embrace of its surrounding community, developing numerous programs to help San Francisco’s underprivileged to break the cycle of poverty. Its extensive network of services includes the only food program in San Francisco offering three meals a day, 365 days a year, as well as an outpatient substance abuse treatment and recovery program that has received national recognition as a model of innovation.

Visit the Perkins School of Theology website
Visit Glide Memorial United Methodist Church online

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