Peter Moore appointed to campuswide curricular and policy role

University Curriculum

Peter Moore appointed to campuswide curricular and policy role

Dedman Faculty Peter Moore PortraitPeter K. Moore, SMU associate dean for general education and a longtime advocate for liberal studies and scholarship, has been appointed associate provost for curricular innovation and policy effective Oct. 3, 2016.

Moore’s new role is part of a reorganization of the University’s Office of General Education, which will move from Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences to the Office of the Provost. The move was announced jointly by Steven Currall, provost and vice president for academic affairs, and Thomas DiPiero, dean of Dedman College, after extensive consultation with the SMU Faculty Senate.

Moore will also continue as co-chair of the Provost’s General Education Review Task Force.

Locating the Office of General Education in the Office of the Provost is expected to provide several benefits for both the University at large and to Dedman College, say Currall and DiPiero:

  • The new arrangement will allow SMU to be more strategically responsive to trends in higher education and in the marketplace.
  • The new structure will enhance flexibility to ensure the University Curriculum works for every undergraduate college and school.
  • The new associate provost will provide coordination across the curriculum.
  • The associate provost will also work to promote innovations in curricular structure and content.
  • University advising, the University Honors Program and the Hilltop Scholars Program will remain in Dedman College.

Moore brings to his new position a wealth of familiarity with SMU’s core curriculum. As head of the Office of General Education, since 2014 he has worked with the University Curriculum Committee and the Faculty Senate’s Academic Policies Committee, as well as faculty across the University, to develop the revised curriculum known as UC 2016 based on data and experience gained from the University Curriculum of 2010.

> Learn more about UC 2016 at the SMU General Education homepage

A professor of mathematics, Moore has also served as senior associate dean and associate dean of academic affairs in Dedman College since July 2010. Dean DiPiero will appoint a new full-time associate dean; plans for that process will be announced at a later date.

“During recent years, Professor Moore’s work has evolved to be more focused on campuswide general education and liberal arts,” said Currall. “This move will create an opportunity for Peter to use his considerable talents in the Provost’s Office and for Dedman College to have a fully dedicated associate dean.”

“Peter Moore is passionate about undergraduate education, and he knows more about how different institutions approach it than anyone I know,” said DiPiero. “I look forward to continuing a close and collaborative working relationship with him as we design new programs and continue to fine-tune our University Curriculum.”

Moore joined the Department of Mathematics in Dedman College in August 2000, after serving 11 years as a faculty member at Tulane University in New Orleans. His teaching interests include calculus, differential equations, numerical analysis and modeling.

He served as department chair from August 2005 to May 2009, and twice as dean ad interim of the College: from June 2009 to July 2010 and from June to August 2014. His SMU service also includes membership on the Provost’s Committee on Tenure and Promotion and the Steering Committee for Project SMU: Operational Excellence for the Second Century (OE2C), now the Office of Operational Excellence.

As a researcher, Moore is an expert in the computational solution of reaction-diffusion equations that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering applications. His projects have been funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, among others.

Moore’s work has been published in several major peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Numerical Mathematics, Applied Numerical Mathematics, Mathematics of Computation, Chemical Physics Letters, the Journal of Computational Physics, the Journal of Physical Chemistry, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, and Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science.

Moore received the “M” Award, SMU’s highest honor for service to the University, in 2012. In 2010, during his first appointment as Dedman College acting dean, he became the first administrator to be elected to membership in Phi Beta Kappa by the SMU (Gamma of Texas) chapter. His professional service includes an appointment to the editorial board of Applied Numerical Mathematics from January 2004 to December 2009.

Moore received his B.S. degree in mathematics from Michigan Technological University in 1981. He earned his master’s and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1983 and 1988.

September 29, 2016|Faculty in the News, For the Record, News|

University appoints new SMU Abroad director

Catherine WinnieAs the new director of SMU Abroad, Catherine Hutchison Winnie brings to the University expertise in developing diverse global experiences for students, including programs for research, internships and service abroad.

Winnie, who began her appointment at the start of the fall term, comes to SMU from Harvard University, where she most recently served as director of the Office of International Education at Harvard College. Winnie holds a doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from Swarthmore College.

“Students and faculty at SMU interested in study abroad will find Cathy Winnie’s know-how and enthusiasm contagious and empowering,” says Associate Provost Harold Stanley, who oversees the Office of Education Abroad. “Such interest is increasingly central to SMU’s mission. SMU’s Centennial Strategic Plan includes the goal of increasing participation in study abroad, and in the University Curriculum faculty adopted a global engagement requirement for all undergraduates. Dr. Winnie brings an impressive record of enhancing study abroad and is the right person at the right time to help SMU fulfill its goals.”

Winnie is responsible for overseeing SMU Abroad’s 148 summer, semester and yearlong study abroad programs in 50 countries. More than 500 students participate every year in SMU Abroad programs in Africa, Asia, Europe, Central America, South America and Australia.

“This is an exciting time to be at SMU and to be part of its mission to shape world changers,” Winnie says. “SMU has a strong commitment to a global education both here in Dallas and abroad that helps students succeed in our increasingly interdependent world. The direct global experiences offered by SMU Abroad are not only enriching students’ education, but also building bridges between communities.”

Winnie says she is looking forward to partnering with students, faculty and staff to explore their international goals and help them open doors abroad. “Some students may benefit from a semester or year of coursework at a foreign university, while others may choose an international internship, service work or independent research,” she says. “In all cases, they are gaining new perspectives on problem-solving, leadership and culture, as well as important life skills such as adaptability. When students bring this knowledge back home to SMU and Dallas, our entire community benefits.”

Winnie’s prior appointments include director of Academic Enhancement Programs at Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, where she was founding director of the RIT Honors Program as well as the Study Abroad and Fellowships offices.

At Yale University, Winnie was assistant dean and founding director of the Office of International Education and Fellowships of Yale College. In addition, she served as associate dean of international study at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, where she also created an office for graduate international fellowships.

Winnie has traveled extensively and speaks several languages, including German, French and Spanish. She is the recipient of a DAAD Fellowship, a Berlin Airlift Scholarship, and an alumna of the Management Development Program of the Harvard School of Education. She has lectured at the University of Mainz in Germany and at Instituto Meyer in Bogotá, Colombia. She and her husband, Larry Winnie, are the parents of two school-age daughters, Lidya and Samerawit, whom they adopted from Ethiopia in 2005, and a son, Matt, an aspiring screenwriter.

Written by Sarah Hanan

October 9, 2013|News|

Next University Curriculum course proposal deadline is Sept. 26, 2011

A class held outdoors at Dallas HallThe next deadline is approaching to submit course proposals for SMU’s new University Curriculum (UC). The University Curriculum Steering Committee will accept submissions for the 2012-13 academic year through Monday, Sept. 26, 2011. The new curriculum will launch in Fall 2012.

The University Curriculum website (log in with your 8-digit SMU ID and e-mail password) includes information on the components of the new curriculum, the Student Learning Outcomes for each component, and proposal forms for both new courses and revised courses that are already part of the current General Education Curriculum (GEC).

The committee is especially interested in proposals for courses that can satisfy more than one requirement (e.g., that satisfy a Pillar requirement as well as a Proficiency).

The site also offers information on proposing a Ways of Knowing course – the team-taught, interdisciplinary courses that are a central element of the UC. Faculty members may discuss their ideas and proposals at SMU’s Ways of Knowing Group on Facebook.

All course proposals should be sent to Dennis Cordell, Associate Dean for General Education, and Julian Guevara, assistant in the Dean’s Office.

SMU’s Center for Teaching Excellence will host a University Curriculum Proposal Workshop 8-9:20 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 20 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. The workshop is intended to serve as a practical guide to writing successful proposals for the new curriculum and will include a variety of examples and models, as well as discussion of issues and concerns. Register online at the CTE homepage.

> Learn more at smu.edu/uc (log in with your 8-digit SMU ID and e-mail password)
> Join the discussion with SMU’s Ways of Knowing Group on Facebook

September 21, 2011|News, Save the Date|

SMU unveils new plan for ‘Unbridled Learning’

Outdoor class at Dallas HallSMU is answering students’ calls for learning opportunities outside the classroom with a new program that will provide both structure and funding for their endeavors.

The University’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) – “Unbridled Learning: Engaged Learning Beyond the Classroom” – will allow all SMU undergraduate students to participate in at least one extensive experiential learning activity prior to graduation, according to the plan released by SMU’s QEP Committee. It also meets requirements for the University’s upcoming reaccreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).

The program will allow undergraduates to “build on their formal classroom education through participation in structured experiential learning beyond the classroom, which will help them to develop a significant and sophisticated understanding of the ways in which the context of the world community intersects with disciplinary knowledge,” according to the QEP Committee’s executive summary.

The committee’s discussions have centered on experiential learning since its formation in summer 2009, says chair Maggie Dunham, professor of computer science and engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering.

“The QEP part of our reaccreditation process is pretty much wide open for schools to determine. The committee’s main job was to come up with an implementation plan,” Dunham says. “Experiential learning is the area where we think students will gain the most from their University experience. They value this kind of activity and have told us as much.”

Indeed, a survey of SMU students conducted by the Temerlin Advertising Institute, led by Professor Brice Campbell, in Meadows School of the Arts found that more than 80 percent of them “find that it is important to experience life outside the classroom.”

The QEP will provide opportunities – and University support, including funding – for undergraduate students to choose an out-of-classroom experiential learning activity in the community focus area of their choice:

  • Research
  • Creative
  • Civic
  • Professional

QEP experiences will also have specific requirements that may not be satisfied by existing SMU experiential learning activities, according to the committee. A key feature is that each student will be in charge of identifying, defining, completing and reporting on his or her work.

All experiences will be approved by an advisory committee and overseen by SMU faculty with other qualified internal and external mentors. A QEP experience can be undertaken anywhere, but must include extensive involvement with a learning community.

All QEP participants will be required to write a reflective article about their experiences, to be published in a new SMU online journal. In addition, new Undergraduate Engaged Learning Conferences will be held annually to showcase student QEP experiences.

The committee found that many SMU students already pursue experiential activities beyond the classroom, but many more are confused about how to go about doing it, Dunham says. The recommendations for the QEP grant program and other support mechanisms should address that problem, she adds.

SMU institutional support for the QEP will include:

  • Monetary support
  • A new position for a Director of Engaged Learning
  • A new Director of Undergraduate Research

The oversight infrastructure will include the Engaged Learning Advisory Committee, as well as community partners and mentors, and a new website to keep track of experiential learning opportunities for students.

In addition, QEP projects will build on and augment important elements of the new University Curriculum (UC), to be offered beginning in 2012. The program will allow students to pursue the community and global requirements of the UC in more depth.

Finally, the QEP will increase faculty awareness of the importance of and participation in undergraduate experiential learning outside the classroom.

“It’s important that these experiences become part of our University culture,” Dunham says. “Our plan will help facilitate that.”

> Read more about the University Curriculum
> Learn more from SMU’s Quality Enhancement Plan information site
> Visit the SACS Reaffirmation of Accreditation for SMU homepage

January 27, 2011|News|

New University Curriculum gets ‘yes’ vote from SMU faculty

Dallas Hall with studentsThe SMU faculty has voted 194-74 in favor of a new University general education curriculum – the common knowledge, skills and experiences every student must accrue before they graduate.

Approval for what is now called the University Curriculum (UC) came through an electronic vote tallied March 18-19, 2010, through SMU’s Office of Information Technology.

The Faculty Senate held an open forum March 17 to allow faculty members to discuss questions and concerns with members of the General Education Review Committee, which formulated the new curriculum with input from the SMU faculty and key staff members. The new curriculum will be submitted next to the University’s administration and Board of Trustees.

> Download the final UC proposal (log in with your e-mail ID and password)

The General Education Review Committee began meeting in October 2008 to review the existing curriculum for needed changes. Its goals included “eliciting the faculty’s judgment about the core knowledge and competencies that graduates of SMU should possess,” as well as to ensure “ongoing involvement of the faculty in determining and implementing the details,” according to the proposal document.

The Committee presented its first proposal for faculty input and discussion in April 2009. The final proposal – dated March 2, 2010 – describes the faculty committees that will be responsible for further defining and implementing the new course of study.

> Proposed structure of UC committees

In addition, the latest proposal clarifies that student electronic portfolios are not a requirement for graduation and will not require faculty evaluation or certification. Instead, it recommends “that students be introduced, in their first year at SMU, to the use of e-portfolios.”

Among the goals set for the new curriculum is to make it easier for students to pursue multiple majors and minors. It also aims to accommodate more opportunities for honors programming, international study, undergraduate research options, internship experiences and service learning.

> The UC’s connections to the SMU Strategic Plan

Additionally, the University Curriculum’s structure is designed to better accommodate transfer students from other universities, as well as make it easier for current SMU students to transfer their existing credits if they change majors.

As with the current General Education Curriculum (GEC), the UC will constitute approximately one-third of a 120-hour baccalaureate degree plan. An estimated 85 percent of the new requirements will map to existing courses.

> See the short version of the UC and GEC overlay.
> See the long version of the UC and GEC overlay.

Read more about the University Curriculum under the link below.

(more…)

March 24, 2010|News|
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