Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns returns to SMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015

Turner/Wells Fargo Tate Student Forum

Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns returns to SMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015

Ken BurnsRenowned director and documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, creator of Baseball, The War and The Roosevelts, will return to SMU Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015 for another engagement with the Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. Burns will present The Oncor Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium

Burns has been making documentary films for almost 40 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has directed and produced some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made, including The Civil War; Baseball; Jazz; The Statue of Liberty; Huey Long; Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery; Frank Lloyd Wright; Mark Twain; Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson; The War; The National Parks: America’s Best Idea; The Roosevelts: An Intimate History; and, most recently, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies.

> Learn more about Ken Burns’ work at his website: KenBurns.com

In 2009, David Zurawik of The Baltimore Sun said, “Ken Burns is not only the greatest documentarian of the day, but also the most influential filmmaker, period. That includes feature filmmakers like George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. I say that because Burns not only turned millions of persons on to history with his films, he showed us a new way of looking at our collective past and ourselves.” The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.”

His future projects include films on Jackie Robinson, the Vietnam War, the history of country music, Ernest Hemingway and the history of stand-up comedy.

Burns’ films have been honored with dozens of major awards, including 13 Emmy Awards, two Grammy Awards and two Oscar nominations. In 2008, at the News & Documentary Emmy Awards, Ken Burns was honored by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

This is Burns’ second visit to SMU to deliver a Tate Distinguished Lecture. Previously, he spoke during the 2004-05 series.

> Follow Ken Burns on Twitter: @KenBurns

All SMU community members are invited to the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m. Please tweet your questions for the forum to #SMUtate.

Tickets for the evening are sold out. However, students can go to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-served basis.

> Follow the Tate Series on social media: Twitter – @SMUtate | Instagram – @smutate

December 1, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News|

Health expert Sanjay Gupta to deliver 2012-13 Tate Lecture Nov. 27

Dr. Sanjay GuptaNeurosurgeon, public health policy expert and CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta visits SMU Tuesday, Nov. 27 for the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Jones Day Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Based in Atlanta, Gupta plays an integral role in CNN’s reporting on health and medical news for shows including “Starting Point with Soledad O’Brien,” “Anderson Cooper 360°,” and network documentaries. In addition, he anchors the weekend medical affairs program “Sanjay Gupta, M.D.” Gupta also contributes to CNN.com and CNNHealth.com. He has reported from earthquake- and tsunami-ravaged Japan and provided live coverage of the unprecedented flooding in Pakistan in 2010. He earned two Emmy Awards for his reporting in Haiti after the devastating 2010 earthquake.

In 2003, Gupta embedded with the U.S. Navy’s “Devil Docs” medical unit, reporting from Iraq and Kuwait as the unit traveled to Baghdad. He provided live coverage of the first operation performed during the war, and performed life-saving brain surgery five times himself in a desert operating room. In addition, he contributed to the network’s 2010 Peabody Award-winning coverage of the oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico – as well as its 2006 Peabody Award-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where his Charity Hospital coverage for “Anderson Cooper 360°” resulted in a 2006 News & Documentary Emmy for Outstanding Feature Story. In 2004, Gupta traveled to Sri Lanka to cover the tsunami disaster that took more than 155,000 lives in Southeast Asia, contributing to CNN’s 2005 Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia Award.

Gupta’s passion for inspiring Americans to lead healthier, more active lives led him to launch “Fit Nation,” CNN’s multi-platform anti-obesity initiative. In 2011, “Fit Nation” follows the progress of Gupta and six CNN viewers as they inspire each other while training for a triathlon.

Follow Sanjay Gupta on Twitter @SanjayGuptaCNN

In addition to his work for CNN, Gupta is a member of the staff and faculty at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is associate chief of neurosurgery at Grady Memorial Hospital and regularly performs surgery at Emory University and Grady hospitals. He holds memberships in the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery, a certified medical investigator, and a board member of the LiveStrong Foundation.

Before joining CNN, Gupta completed neurosurgical fellowships at the Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute in Memphis and at the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor. In 1997, he was selected as a White House Fellow, serving as a special adviser to First Lady Hillary Clinton.

Gupta contributes to the CBS news magazine “60 Minutes” and “CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley.” He is the author of two best-selling books, Chasing Life (2007) and Cheating Death (2009), both of which became companion documentaries for CNN.

A native of the Detroit metropolitan area, Gupta earned his B.S. degree in biomedical sciences from the University of Michigan, where he also received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree in 2012 for his accomplishments in the medical field. He earned his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Gupta will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Gupta a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #SMUtateGupta. A moderator will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

November 27, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Gaming guru Jane McGonigal delivers Tate Lecture Nov. 13, 2012

Jane McGonigalGamer, game designer, author and futurist Jane McGonigal is on the Hilltop Tuesday, Nov. 13 for SMU’s 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. She will give the Oncor Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

McGonigal’s work emphasizes the power of games to solve problems. Named by The New York Times as one of 10 scientists with the best vision for what is coming next, and by Oprah Winfrey as one of the 20 most inspiring women in the world, she is an expert in harnessing the power of digital games to help solve some of the biggest challenges facing the world today and in the future.

In her New York Times best-selling book Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World, McGonigal makes the case that the gamer spirit — an attitude of fun, dedicated, collective problem-solving — is our greatest asset as we face the social, economic and environmental problems of the 21st century. She argues that game designers are “happiness engineers” who are experts in making difficult tasks engaging.

Follow Jane McGonigal on Twitter @AvantGame

As a world-renowned designer of alternate-reality games (ARGs), McGonigal specializes in reimagining the world as a place where every challenge is a quest — where the harder a task is, the more people want to do it. An ARG activity can be as mundane as household chores or as urgent as surviving peak oil or establishing local sustainable businesses (the subjects of two of her own games). But more than just reframing these challenges, McGonigal works to capture the kind of heroism, epic purpose and communal striving that many struggle to find in their day-to-day routines.

McGonigal is the chief creative officer of SuperBetter Labs (formerly Social Chocolate) and has keynoted the Game Developers Conference, South By Southwest and Google Zeitgeist Americas. She also serves as director of game research and development with Institute for the Future, a nonprofit research group based in Palo Alto, California. Her TED 2010 speech attracted more than 1.7 million views. She also played a high-profile role at the 2012 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January.

A native of Philadelphia and a former New Yorker, McGonigal lives in San Francisco with her husband, Kiyash. She earned her B.A. degree in English from Fordham University and her Ph.D. in performance studies from the University of California-Berkeley.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. McGonigal will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask McGonigal a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #SMUtateMcGonigal. A moderator will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

November 13, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: March 29, 2011

Margaret Spellings and Geoffrey CanadaTate Series focuses on the future of education: A discussion of the future viability of American education will be the focus of the next 2010-11 Tate Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday, March 29. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings and Harlem Children’s Zone founder and CEO Geoffrey Canada will discuss “How Will We Teach America’s Children?” at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. Moderator for the event will be Keven Ann Willey, vice president and editorial page editor of The Dallas Morning News. Spellings was the U.S. Secretary of Education from 2005-09 and led the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act. She is president and CEO of Margaret Spellings and Company and a leading national expert in public policy. In 2009, SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development recognized her contributions to education with the Simmons Luminary Award. The Harlem Children’s Zone was featured in the 2010 film “Waiting for ‘Superman’.” Through this program, Canada has dedicated the past 20 years to helping impoverished, at-risk youth to rise above their circumstances. The Zone Project today covers a 100-block area of Harlem and serves 10,000 children and their families through in-school and after-school programs, social services and community-building programs. The evening lecture is sold out, but the speakers will answer questions from the SMU community and local high school students during the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Tate Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Admission to the Student Forum is free. For more information, call Program Services at 214-768-8283 (214-SMU-TATE).

In addition, the Simmons School will present a free screening of “Waiting for ‘Superman'” at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 31, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. The screening will be followed by a Q&A session with panelists Charles Glover, executive director of Teach for America, Dallas; Israel Cordero, principal of the Dallas Independent School District’s W.W. Samuell High School; and Deborah Diffily, Simmons faculty member. The discussion will be moderated by Lee Alvoid, chair of Simmons’ Education Policy and Leadership Department. Refreshments will be provided. Cosponsored by the SMU Program Council, Sigma Lambda Beta International Fraternity Inc. and SMU Colony.

Main cast of 'Indigenes'French Film Festival continues: The 15th-anniversary celebration of SMU’s French Film Festival continues through April 9, 2011. Among the upcoming screenings is Daratt (2006) on Friday, April 1. Written and directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun and winner of a Grand Special Jury Prize (UNESCO Award) at the 2006 Venice Film Festival, the film deals with themes of family, vengeance and redemption in the aftermath of the devastating civil war in Chad. The festival continues Wednesday, April 6, with Indigènes (Days of Glory, 2006). César and Lumière award-winning cowriter and director Rachid Bouchareb tells the stories of four North African recruits who fight to liberate France during World War II, as well as for equal treatment in the French military and society. All screenings are at 7 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater, and all films will be shown in French with English subtitles. Admission is free and open to the public. These films are intended for an adult audience and may contain sexual content, nudity and violence. Sponsored by the SMU French Club, the SMU Students’ Association and the Tournées Festival. For more information and a complete schedule, visit the 2011 French Film Festival homepage.
(Right, Roschdy Zem, Samy Naceri, Jamel Debbouze and Sami Bouajila in Indigènes.)

March 29, 2011|Calendar Highlights|
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