Statistician and data-journalism pioneer Nate Silver to speak in SMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series May 5, 2015

Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum

Statistician and data-journalism pioneer Nate Silver to speak in SMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series May 5, 2015

Nate Silver, SMU Tate speaker

Statistician, author and blogger Nate Silver – who has earned a national spotlight with his innovative analyses of political polling – will deliver the next Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture of 2015. Silver gives the Jones Day Lecture at 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 5 in McFarlin Auditorium.

Follow Nate Silver on Twitter: @NateSilver538

Before his work in politics, Silver established his credentials as an analyst of baseball statistics. He developed the acclaimed sabermetric system PECOTA (Player Empirical Comparison and Optimization Test Algorithm), which predicts player performance, career development, and seasonal winners and losers.

He first gained national attention during the 2008 presidential election, when he correctly predicted the results of the primaries and the presidential winner in 49 states. In 2012, he called 50 of 50 states. The accuracy of Silver’s analyses and predictions, and the innovative ways in which he arrived at them, led TIME Magazine to name him one of The World’s 100 Most Influential People in April 2009. In 2013, he was listed at #1 on Fast Company magazine’s list of The 100 Most Creative People in Business.

In 2010, Silver’s FiveThirtyEight blog was licensed for publication by The New York Times. The site won Webby Awards for Best Political Blog from the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences in 2012 and 2013.

> Learn more about Nate Silver’s work at FiveThirtyEight.com

The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver

Today, Silver is pioneering the new field of data journalism with the new FiveThirtyEight, recently relaunched in partnership with ESPN. The new format allows Silver to cover a wider range of topics, including politics, sports, science and travel. He also appears as an ESPN on-air commentator.

Silver’s first book, The Signal and the Noise, reached the New York Times best-seller list and was named the #1 best nonfiction book of 2012 by Amazon.com, as well as winning the 2013 Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science. Silver has also contributed chapters to several books in the Baseball Prospectus series, including Mind Game, Baseball Between the Numbers, and It Ain’t Over ‘til It’s Over.

Silver earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Chicago in 2000. Since then, he has received four honorary doctorates.

Tuesday’s evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. They may meet in the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m.

Silver will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 5 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

To ask Silver a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with the hashtag #SMUtate.

> Visit SMU’s Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage

May 5, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News|

Chess champion, activist and author Garry Kasparov delivers SMU’s March 4 Tate Distinguished Lecture

Garry KasparovChess grandmaster, author and human rights activist Garry Kasparov visits the Hilltop Tuesday, March 4 for SMU’s 2013-14 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give The Ebby Halliday Companies Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

In 1985 at the age of 22, Kasparov became the youngest world chess champion in history. He played IBM’s Deep Blue computer twice in 1996 and 1997 and won the Linares super tournament nine times in 16 years. Kasparov made history when he won 10 major tournament victories in a row in 2002. That same year, he launched the Kasparov Chess Foundation to introduce chess into the education system, which operates in all 50 states and several countries.

Follow Garry Kasparov on Twitter @Kasparov63

Kasparov retired from professional chess in 2005 after a record 20 years as the world’s top-ranked player. Following his retirement, he became active in the Russian pro-democracy movement and is the founder and chairman of the United Civil Front, a social movement that is a part of The Other Russia, an opposition coalition in Moscow.

As an author, Kasparov has published more than 20 books, including My Great Predecessorswhich follows the history of the 12 world champions who preceded him, How Life Imitates Chess and, most recently, The Blueprint: Reviving Innovation, Rediscovering Risk, and Rescuing the Free Market.

SMU students may attend the evening lecture for free with their University ID if seats become available. Kasparov will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Kasparov a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #SMUTate. Student moderator Lauren Lyngstad will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

March 4, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series returns with author Khaled Hosseini Feb. 11, 2014

HosseiniNew York Times best-selling author Khaled Hosseini will deliver the first Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture of 2014. The author of The Kite Runner gives the Tolleson Family Lecture at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 in McFarlin Auditorium.

Hosseini did not start out as a writer, making his debut in 2003 after more than ten years of practicing medicine. Originally from Afghanistan, Khaled moved with his family to the United States in 1980 after being granted political asylum from his war-torn homeland. Khaled was 15 when they moved, and he entered school in California speaking no English. He went on to get a Bachelor’s degree in biology from Santa Clara University and a medical degree from the University of California-San Diego.

Follow Khaled Hosseini on Twitter

While working as a doctor, Hosseini released The Kite Runner. After its wild success, he left the medical profession to become a full-time writer. The Kite Runner spent more than five years on the New York Times best-seller list, and Hosseini followed it up with the novels A Thousand Splendid Suns and And the Mountains Echoed. His novels feature the recurring setting of his Afghanistan homeland, as well as the recurring theme of family.

In addition to writing, Hosseini has provided support and service to Afghanistan. In 2006, he was named a goodwill envoy to the United Nations Refugee Agency. Following this he established The Khaled Hosseini Foundation, a nonprofit that provides humanitarian assistance to the people of Afghanistan.

In 2007 The Kite Runner was made into a film; a movie version of A Thousand Splendid Suns is due out in 2015. Hosseini currently lives in California with his wife, Roya, and their two children.

Tuesday’s evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. They may meet in the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m.

Hosseini will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

To ask Hosseini a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @tkhf and the hashtag #SMUtate.

> Visit SMU’s Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage

February 10, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News|

Co-founders of the Campaign to Fix the Debt, Erskine Bowles
and Alan Simpson, deliver final Tate Lecture of 2013

Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson, co-founders of the Campaign to Fix the Debt, will be at SMU Tuesday, Dec. 3 to deliver the final lecture of the Tate Distinguished Lecture Series for 2013. They will give the Omni Hotels Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

BowlesErskine Bowles started his career in financial services. He worked for numerous venture and private equity firms and even founded the firm, Bowles, Hollowell and Conner. In 1991, he joined the administration of President Bill Clinton as Administrator of the Small Business Administration and went on to serve as Clinton’s Deputy Chief of Staff and later as White House Chief of Staff from 1997-98. Bowles is credited with negotiating the first balanced budget in a generation during his time at the White House.

Follow Bowles & Simpson on Twitter

SimpsonAlan Simpson comes from a legacy of law; after his honorable discharge from the Army in 1956 he practiced law for 18 years at his father’s firm, Simpson, Kepler and Simpson. He went on to serve as City Attorney of Cody, Wyoming for 10 years and in 1964 he was elected state representative for his native Park County in the Wyoming State Legislature. Simpson continued his political career and served three terms in the United States Senate from 1978-97.

In 2010 Barack Obama asked Bowles and Simpson to co-chair the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform. The bipartisan commission produced a plan to reduce the Nation’s deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade. The two men then co-founded the Campaign to Fix the Debt, a non-partisan movement to put America on a better fiscal and economic path. Bowles and Simpson will be speaking of this current project at Tuesday’s Tate.

Learn more about the Campaign to Fix the Debt

Bowles graduated from UNC and received his M.B.A. degree from Columbia University. He is noted for coordinating the federal response to the Oklahoma City bombing and in 2004  joined the United National Deputy Special Envoy to coordinate the global response to the Indian Ocean tsunami. He is married and has three children and nine grandchildren. Two of his sons dealt with juvenile diabetes, leading to Bowles’ involvement in the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, including service as its national president.

Simpson received his bachelor’s and J.D. degrees from the University of Wyoming. Before accepting his current position, he was a visiting lecturer and taught a class part-time with his brother at the University of Wyoming. He wrote the book Right in the Old Gazoo: A Lifetime of Scrapping with the Press and is the subject of a biography entitled Shooting from the Lip. He is married and has three children and six grandchildren.

Tuesday’s evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available; meet in the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m.

Bowles and Simpson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

To ask the men a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @BowlesSimpson and the hashtag #SMUtate.

The Tate Distinguished Lecture Series will return in 2014 with Khaled Hosseini on Tuesday, Feb. 11.

December 3, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson gives Tate Lecture Nov. 19, 2013

RobinsonInternationally acclaimed expert on creativity, innovation and human resources in education and business Sir Ken Robinson visits SMU on Tuesday, Nov. 19. He will speak on “All Our Futures: Learning to be Creative” as part of the 2013-14 Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Robinson works with numerous governments, international agencies and various businesses to develop creative and economic strategies. He speaks to audiences on creative challenges facing business and education in global economies. In 1998 he led a national commission for the UK Government on creativity, education and the economy. He has also served as one of the four international advisors to the Singapore Government for its strategy to become the creative hub of South East Asia.

Follow Sir Ken Robinson on Twitter 

Robinson is a three-time speaker for the TED conference. His 2006 TED Talk, “How schools kill creativity,” was the most-watched TED Talk of all time as of 2013. The video, and that of his 2010 talk, “Bring on the learning revolution!,” have been viewed by around 200 million people in more than 150 countries. His April 2013 talk, titled “How to escape education’s death valley,” describes “three principles crucial for the human mind to flourish – and how current education culture works against them,” according to the TED website.

For 12 years Robinson was a professor of education at the University of Warwick, where he is now professor emeritus. He has received five honorary degrees and numerous awards for his work in arts, education and business. In 2003 he received knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II for his services to the arts. He is also the author of three books; his first, The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything, is a New York Times best seller. In 2005 he was named one of TIME/FORTUNE/CNN’s “Principal Voices.”

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Robinson was born in Liverpool and studied at Bretton Hall College of Education, University of Leeds. He received a Ph.D. from the University of London. He is married to Marie-Therese Robinson and lives in Los Angeles; they have two children.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available; meet in the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. Sir Robinson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

To ask Sir Robinson a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @SirKenRobinson and the hashtag #SMUtate.

November 19, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|
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