Junior Rahfin Faruk receives 2014 Truman Scholarship

Truman Scholarships

Junior Rahfin Faruk receives 2014 Truman Scholarship

SMU junior Rahfin Faruk, 2014 Truman Scholar

SMU junior Rahfin Faruk has been named a 2014 Truman Scholar. The prestigious and highly competitive national scholarship recognizes college students who are “change agents,” with outstanding leadership potential and a commitment to public service careers.

Faruk was one of 59 students, mostly college juniors, from 52 U.S. colleges and universities selected to receive the award, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate study. He is the 14th Truman Scholar at SMU since the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation was established by Congress in 1975. He was one of 655 candidates nominated by 293 colleges and universities for one of academia’s most sought-after awards.

Two other SMU juniors also were selected as finalists for the Truman Scholarship: Prithvi Rudrappa, a Dedman College Scholar majoring in biochemistry in Dedman College and finance in Cox School of Business, with a minor in Spanish; and Fantine Giap, a President’s Scholar majoring in biological sciences and minoring in mathematics and psychology in Dedman College.

Faruk, of Richardson, Texas, is an SMU President’s Scholar majoring in economics, political science, public policy and religious studies, with a minor in mathematics, in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He plans to pursue an MBA and a master’s in public policy to work in the social enterprise sector.

“It’s fitting that the Truman Scholarship Foundation honored Rahfin Faruk as a change agent,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “Rahfin not only has excelled academically, but he also has applied his knowledge and research skills to important issues facing the North Texas and global community. With his record of servant leadership on campus and in the community, Rahfin is an SMU world changer with big ideas who no doubt will make a significant contribution as a Truman Scholar.”

“As someone who wants to break down sectoral boundaries, I was attracted to the societal impact I could have as a Truman Scholar,” Faruk says. “Truman Scholars are everywhere – in a wide array of sectors and functions – and they are working to serve humanity in better ways.”

In his graduate studies, Faruk intends to focus on improving financial inclusion, the financial system that gives the poor and marginalized access to credit, savings and insurance services. At SMU, Faruk founded a microfinance initiative called Green Riba, which provides zero-interest loans to low-income entrepreneurs in West Dallas. He twice was awarded grants for his organization through Big iDeas at SMU, an undergraduate research program.

“Services many take for granted — a savings account, free check cashing and ATM access — cost the poor disproportionately more money,” Faruk says. “Through my work with my microfinance organization, I came to realize that financial inclusion should have a bigger seat at the political table because it is interconnected to so many other aspects of life, such as health care, education and upward mobility.”

Written by Sarah Hanan

> Read the full story from SMU News

April 17, 2014|For the Record, News|

Warren Seay: Scholar, citizen…school board member?

Warren SeayWarren Seay says service is in his future, and it’s his present focus as well. The junior Hunt Leadership Scholar has received a prestigious national award recognizing his potential – even as he’s running for public office for the first time, at age 20.

Out of more than 600 candidates, Seay is one of 60 students from 55 U.S. colleges and universities to be named a 2009 Truman Scholar. The award recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government or elsewhere in public service. It provides up to $30,000 for graduate study, in addition to leadership training and internship opportunities. Seay is the 12th Truman Scholar at SMU since the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation was established by Congress in 1975.

“This Truman Scholarship is a testament to the guidance I’ve received from my professors and mentors at SMU,” says Seay, a political science major in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and the president of Omega Psi Phi fraternity. “It represents the type of service-learning that SMU offers and that I want to be part of in the future.”

Seay learned about the Truman Scholarship Foundation during his time as a Department of Labor intern in the 2008-10 Institute for Responsible Citizenship. He began the intensive application process upon his return to SMU in Fall 2008, focusing on minorities and education, particularly in Texas schools and his hometown district of DeSoto.

“I’ve seen what education can do for a person,” he says. “The level of minority underachievement bothers me, and I want to devote graduate school and my career to closing the achievement gap that exists in our country.”

As a result of his research on struggling students and schools, Seay says, he decided to launch a bid for an open seat on the DeSoto Independent School District Board of Trustees.

He told The Dallas Morning News, “I’m a lifelong product of DeSoto’s public school system, I’ve studied the issues, and I know the schools well.” The school board election will be held May 9, 2009.

Read more from SMU News

March 30, 2009|News|
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