Bob Buford receives ethics award from SMU Feb. 10

Tom Mayo

Bob Buford receives ethics award from SMU Feb. 10

Bob BufordBob Buford, whose Halftime organization inspires business and professional leaders to direct their talents toward service, will be honored as recipient of the 2010 J. Erik Jonsson Ethics Award during a noon luncheon Feb. 10 at the Belo Mansion in Dallas.

The award is presented annually by SMU’s Cary Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility to individuals who exemplify the spirit of moral leadership and public virtue.

“The Maguire Center is proud to honor a person whose inspiration and guidance have had such a profound and deep impact on the lives of thousands of others in Dallas and around the world,” said Maguire Center director Tom Mayo. “Bob Buford has dedicated the second half of his career and life to helping others attain ‘lives of significance,’ by which Bob means ‘lives of service.'”

Until the sale of his company in July 1999, Buford served as Chairman of the Board and CEO of Buford Television, Inc., a family owned cable television business. He co-founded Leadership Network in 1984, a non-profit church growth consulting firm, and became founding chairman in 1988 of what is now known as the Leader to Leader Institute, which helps guide managers in social service organizations. In 1995, Buford wrote Halftime, a book on finding fulfillment in the second half of life that grew to an organization bearing the same name.

J. Erik Jonsson was a founder of Texas Instruments, a strong advocate for education and a public-spirited mayor of Dallas from 1964 to 1971. Past winners of the J. Erik Jonsson Award include Ronald G. Steinhart, Michael M. Boone, Zan W. Holmes Jr., Roger Staubach, Caren Prothro, Tom Luce, Ron Anderson, Jack Lowe, Jr., William T. Solomon, Stanley H. Marcus, Charles C. Sprague and Curtis W. Meadows, Jr.

For ticket information, call the Maguire Center at 214-768-4575.

Read more from SMU News

February 9, 2010|Calendar Highlights, News|

New lecture series explores Holocaust’s lingering impact

'Holocaust Legacies' posterSMU’s Human Rights Education Program is cosponsoring a three-month series of lectures, symposiums, film screenings, photography exhibits and musical performances examining how the Holocaust continues to affect the world.

“Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” begins Sept. 9 with a 7 p.m. reception and a 7:30 p.m. introductory panel discussion in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. The program will run through the end of November with events held both on and off the SMU campus, and all events are free and open to the public.

Panel members on Sept. 9 will include Christopher Anderson, associate professor of sacred music in Perkins School of Theology; Janis Bergman-Carton, art history chair in Meadows School of the Arts; Elliott Dlin, executive director of the Dallas Holocaust Museum; Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Human Rights Education Program and Tom Mayo, director of SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

Halperin, who each December escorts educational groups to former Nazi death camp locations in Poland, is committed to raising awareness of what he calls “the crime within the war,” even as the number of people who lived through the war, and the Holocaust, dwindles with each passing year. September marks the 70th anniversary of the Nazi German invasion of Poland and beginning of World War II.

“It’s safe to say most Americans don’t think about World War II any more,” Halperin said. “We fought the war, defeated the Nazis, and came home the good guys. We mushroomed into a world power. Most Americans since then have lived a relatively safe and comfortable life.”

But the legacy of the Holocaust continues at many levels, Halperin said: The Nazis committed the greatest art theft in history, looting the collections of Jewish families whose descendents are still litigating to see their treasures returned. All major war crime tribunals bear the stamp of the post-World War II Nuremburg Trials, and the United States in May deported a nearly 90-year-old man, John Demjanjuk, for Nazi war crimes.

Halperin noted that in Europe, sensitivity to the Shoah’s legacy is reflected even in restrictions to how people talk and write about the Nazi regime. “You can buy a copy of Adolph Hitler’s Mein Kampf in the SMU Book Store – that’s free speech,” Halperin explained. “You can deny the Holocaust in the U.S., and that’s free speech, too. You can’t do that in Europe.” Halperin said he expects the series to be “a powerful, emotional, somber and sobering series of events.”

Co-sponsors for the 2009 Fall Program Series are SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance, SMU Meadows School of the Arts, SMU Perkins School of Theology, TCU’s Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Social Work and the University of Dallas.

Find a complete schedule at the SMU News site

September 8, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|

Faculty in the News: Summer 2009

Brian StumpScientists in SMU’s Seismology Research Program deployed monitoring stations in North Texas during summer 2009 to gather data on a series of earthquakes that began hitting the area in May. Brian Stump (right) and Chris Hayward, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College, are providing expertise to local and national media outlets for ongoing coverage, including the following stories:

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked with the media regarding several state and national political stories during the summer, including:

William LawrenceWilliam Lawrence (right), Dean, Perkins School of Theology, provided commentary on the health care reform debate and other issues, including:

Bruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, spoke with several media outlets about fuel prices, the Congressional climate change bill and other energy issues for these stories:

Scott MacDonald, Southwest Graduate School of Banking, Cox School of Business, talked about distressed banks taking the cost-cutting measure of closing branch locations with CNNMoney.com Aug. 12, 2009.

Ruben Habito, World Religions, Perkins School of Theology, talks about the increasing acceptance of Buddhism among Christians and Jews who infuse Eastern spiritual insights and practices into their own religions with The Denver Post Aug. 9, 2009.

Kathy Hargrove, Gifted Students Institute, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, spoke about the need for specialized training for teachers of the gifted and talented with The Dallas Morning News Aug. 9, 2009.

Al Armendariz, Environmental and Civil Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, discussed air quality problems in Denton County with The Denton Record-Chronicle Aug. 2, 2009. In addition, he wrote an op-ed on the failure of the North Texas clean-air plan and its consequences for The Dallas Morning News, published July 13, 2009.

Jeff TalleyJeff Talley (at right in photo, with Gen. David Petraeus), Environmental and Civil Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, was the subject of a feature detailing his ideas for using engineering to fight global poverty. It appeared in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram July 29, 2009.

Tom Mayo, Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, provided expertise for a story on health care rationing and the author’s 91-year-old father that appeared in Politics Daily July 29, 2009.

William Maxwell, Finance, Cox School of Business, talked about the state of the American auto industry with The Dallas Morning News July 13, 2009.

John Attanasio, Dean, Dedman School of Law, discussed why Dallas’ law practices have managed to avoid the downsizing occurring at many large national practices with The Dallas Morning News July 6, 2009.

Nathan Cortez, Dedman School of Law, discussed the legal and regulatory uncertainties of “medical tourism” – seeking affordable health care abroad – with Diversity: Issues in Higher Education June 25, 2009.

Darab Ganji and Robert Jordan, Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, wrote an op-ed on the post-election uprising in Iran that was published in The Dallas Morning News June 22, 2009.

Fred Schmidt, Christian Spirituality, Perkins School of Theology, discussed the June 2009 meeting of representatives from Episcopal congregations and dioceses to create a new denomination for a story published by The Fort Worth Star-Telegram June 22, 2009.

Glenn Griffin, Advertising, Meadows School of the Arts, discussed the advantages and drawbacks of the state opening its new “Don’t Mess With Texas” video contest to the public with The Dallas Morning News June 17, 2009

August 18, 2009|Faculty in the News|

Faculty in the News: May 11, 2009

Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the movement to stop President Obama from making the commencement address at Notre Dame with The Associated Press. The resulting article appeared in The Los Angeles Times May 10, 2009.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about incumbents, especially Republicans, in Congress seeking higher office as a path to better opportunities with USA Today May 4, 2009.

James Hollifield, Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, provided expertise on the tight connection between Texas and Mexico in a story about the H1N1 flu’s impact on Mexico’s economy that appeared in The San Francisco Chronicle May 3, 2009.

Tom Mayo, Dedman School of Law and Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, was interviewed for a feature story on Poem In Your Pocket Day that appeared in The Dallas Morning News April 30. 2009. Also featured in the article was SMU senior Jesse Smith, an English/creative writing major in Dedman College.

May 11, 2009|Faculty in the News|

Faculty in the News: April 20, 2009

Mike Polcyn, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College, provided expertise for a story on students at Plano West Senior High School who found rare fossil bones of the mosasaur Platecarpus that have been brought to SMU for further study. The article appeared in The Dallas Morning News April 17, 2009.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked with the Fort Worth Star-Telegram about the possibility of entertainer Kinky Friedman making a second Texas gubernatorial run for a story that appeared in the April 14, 2009 edition. He also discussed the political messaging behind the recent tax-day “tea party” protests with the Star-Telegram April 12, 2009.

Dan Howard, Marketing, Cox School of Business, discussed with The Dallas Morning News the potentially unfortunate timing of Kimberly-Clark Corporation’s launch of a new and more expensive disposable diaper made with natural materials. The article appeared April 14, 2009.

Robin Lovin, Cary Maguire University Professor of Ethics, and Matthew Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the moral issues behind creating and passing on a huge federal debt in “Texas Faith,” a discussion forum of The Dallas Morning News, April 4, 2009.

Tom Mayo, Dedman School of Law, director of SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, talked about a North Texas woman’s decision to harvested her dead son’s sperm in the hope of finding a surrogate and one day raising her son’s child with MSNBC April 14, 2009.

April 20, 2009|Faculty in the News|
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