Tom Mayo

Eighteen SMU professors receive tenure, promotion for 2017-18

Eighteen outstanding SMU faculty members will begin the 2017-18 academic year with new tenure as associate professors or promotion to full professorships.

The following individuals have received tenure or promotion effective Friday, Sept. 1, 2017:

Cox School of Business

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Stanimir Markov, Accounting

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Karisa Cloward, Political Science
  • Erin Hochman, History
  • Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology
  • Benno Rumpf, Mathematics
  • Jayson Sae-Saue, English
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Recommended for tenure (associate professorship previously awarded):

  • Barry Lee, Mathematics

Dedman School of Law

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Chris Jenks, Law (autonomous weapons, military law, national security law, evidence, criminal law, international law, human rights)

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Thomas Wm. Mayo, Law (bioethics, election law, health law, nonprofit/tax-exempt organizations)
  • Meghan J. Ryan, Law (law and science, torts, criminal law, criminal procedure, death penalty, actual innocence)
  • Joshua C. Tate, Law (legal history, trusts and estates, property)

Meadows School of the Arts

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Archie Cummings, Theatre
  • Amy Freund, Art History
  • Jon Hackler, Theatre
  • Peter Kupfer, Music (Musicology)
  • Brian Molanphy, Art

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Carol Leone, Music (Piano)

Three named 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors

SMU 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors James Sullivan and Carrie La Ferle with University trustee Ruth Altshuler - fellow recipient Tom Mayo is not pictured

SMU 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors James Sullivan, Art, and Carrie La Ferle, Advertising, celebrate with University Trustee Ruth Altshuler during the May 2012 board meeting. Not pictured: Tom Mayo, Law.

Three of SMU’s best teachers have been named 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors, as announced by the University’s Center for Teaching Excellence. This year’s honorees are Carrie La Ferle, Advertising, Meadows School of the Arts; Tom Mayo, Law, Dedman School of Law; and James Sullivan, Art, Meadows School of the Arts.

The new members of SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers will join returning members Marc Christensen, Electrical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; Alyce McKenzie, Homiletics, Perkins School of Theology; and David Son, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Fellow 2011 honoree Greg Warden, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, will become president of Franklin College in Lugano, Switzerland, on July 1.

Each year since 2001, the Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Awards recognize four SMU faculty members for their commitment to and achievements in fostering student learning. “These are faculty whose concerns for higher education go beyond classroom boundaries and often the boundaries of their own discipline,” according to the CTE website. “They represent the highest achievement in reaching the goals of higher education.” The professorships are named for SMU Trustee Ruth Altshuler.

Each recipient receives a $10,000 award and membership in SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers for the two years of their appointment as Altshuler Professors. Members participate actively with other members of the Academy to address issues in classroom teaching.

More about this year’s honored professors under the link.

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Students, faculty remember Law Professor Daniel Shuman

SMU Law Professor Daniel ShumanDaniel Shuman, M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, will be remembered for his work as a renowned legal scholar, but he was much more to his students.

“He was a caring mentor to so many of us, right up to even the last week of his life,” says Clarence Wilson, who recently achieved a scholarship with Shuman’s help. Shuman, 62, died Tuesday, April 26, 2011 of multiple system atrophy, a rare neurological disorder.

SMU’s Health Law Association (HLA) has announced that it will raise money for a plaque to serve as a lasting tribute to Shuman’s dedication.

Shuman was the inaugural M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law at the law school and a member of the faculty for more than 33 years teaching torts, evidence, law and social science and mental health law.

“The Law School family has suffered a great loss and our thoughts and prayers are with the Shuman family right now,” says Law Dean John B. Attanasio.

Shuman was a nationally and internationally respected scholar in two separate fields, says colleague and HLA advisor Thomas Mayo, associate professor of law. “Early in his career he did groundbreaking empirical research on the attitudes and behaviors of juries, and he followed that with the best research and writing on law and psychiatry anyone has ever done. His productivity and quality were at the highest levels for an incredible three decades.”

Earlier this year, Shuman received the 2011 Manfred S. Guttmacher Award from the American Psychiatric Association (APA). The recognition – shared with psychiatrist Liza Gold – honors their book, Evaluating Mental Health Disability in the Workplace: Model, Process, and Analysis (Springer, 2009), as an “outstanding contribution to the literature of forensic psychiatry.” The award will be presented during the APA’s annual meeting May 14-18 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

“Institutionally, he shaped the present and future course of the law school as the long-time chair of the faculty appointments committee, and he was extremely helpful to the development of our young faculty,” Mayo adds. “Students adored him.”

One of those is Juris Doctor candidate Isaac Haas, who says, “Professor Shuman was passionate about teaching his students to look beyond mere memorization and understanding of the law and consider the consequences of the decisions we make as a community about right and wrong. And while he was a brilliant scholar and writer, what set him apart as a teacher was the interest that he took in me and so many others.

“Very rarely would I ever leave a conversation with Professor Shuman without him asking about my other classes, job prospects, wife or son,” Haas says. “I am incredibly grateful for the time I spent with him, and with his wife, Emily, as a student, teaching assistant and friend.”

The family has requested that memorials be made to the Texas Voice Project for Parkinson Disease.

To contribute to the HLA’s memorial gift for Shuman, contact Alex Berk.

Written by Denise Gee

Rita Kirk becomes new director of SMU’s Maguire Ethics Center

Rita Kirk, the new director of SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, says she is committed to making ethics a continuing conversation on the SMU campus.

“One of the goals of the Maguire Center is to provoke conversation both in class and out so that ethics becomes a central point of discussion in our daily lives,” she said. “SMU is fortunate to have the Maguire Center. The range of programs, speakers, and internships is impressive, yet awareness among students of ways to engage with the Center can be greatly enhanced. I look forward to working with SMU and its extended community.”

Kirk defines ethics as a lifelong struggle to live intentionally and to define who you are.

The center supports student and faculty ethics-related education and activities, as well as community outreach to private and public institutions in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The center was funded in 1995 by an endowment of $2.5 million from its namesake, Cary Maguire.

A professor in the Division of Corporate Communications and Public Affairs in the Meadows School of the Arts, Kirk became director of the Maguire Center on Jan. 1, 2011, taking over from Tom Mayo, associate professor in the Dedman School of Law. Mayo, a medical ethicist, has guided the program for five and a half years. In addition to his faculty position at SMU, Mayo is an adjunct associate professor of internal medicine at UT-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

“Ethical challenges surround students everywhere and all the time – in their clubs and organizations, in their personal relationships, in their dealings with teachers and classmates,” Mayo said. “I believe the first and often hardest step most of us are challenged to take is to realize that our choices are ethical ones in the first place.”

Click the YouTube screen above for Rita Kirk’s comments on the usefulness of ethics. Click this link to open the Rita Kirk video in a new window. video

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Faculty in the News: Oct. 5, 2010

Metin Eren, a graduate student in archaeology in Dedman College, says trampling by animals may skew the dates on stone artifacts. An article on his research was published in National Geographic Daily News Sept. 29, 2010.

James Guthrie, George W. Bush Institute senior fellow and professor in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, wrote an op-ed on education issues raised by the recent film “Waiting for Superman” that was published in The Christian Science Monitor Sept. 29, 2010. He and David Chard, dean of the Simmons School, provided commentary for an article on a Bush Institute initiative to improve the performance of school principals, in which SMU will participate. The story was published by The Associated Press Sept. 29, 2010.

Tom Mayo, Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, talked about the practice of parents selecting the gender of their children prior to birth with NBC 5 News Sept. 23, 2010. video

Seven students named Maguire and Irby Family Public Service interns

Maguire Center graphicSeven SMU students have been named Maguire and Irby Family Public Service Interns, earning positions in a 14-year-old program that provides summer stipends for public service volunteer work and research.

The interns will work in a variety of programs as far away as Angola and Nicaragua, and as close as Austin and Dallas. The program, sponsored by SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and the Irby Family Foundation, has supported volunteers in 13 states, and 11 countries outside the USA and in more than 100 agencies in Texas.

“We approved grants for more international internships this year than last and continue to see more proposals from graduate students,” said Thomas Mayo, Maguire Center director. “The graduate students, in particular, clearly see these internships as an opportunity to use their advanced studies in a new, nonprofit context that benefits the communities where they will serve. All the students, though, will have potentially life-altering experiences, and the Maguire Center is pleased to help make that happen.”

The 2010 interns and their projects:

Shay Cannedy, an anthropology graduate student in Dedman College, will work with the Green Leaf Program at Refugee Services of Texas Inc. in Austin to develop marriage education classes and help develop a program evaluation system.

John Duvenci, a combined undergraduate/graduate student in the Lyle School of Engineering, will work with Living Water International in Luanda, Angola, to develop a water treatment system for an orphanage.

Kendra Eaton, a junior majoring in markets and culture in Dedman College, will work with Fundacion A. Jean Brugger in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua, tutoring students in English and teaching both art appreciation for children and workshops to help enhance local residents’ computer skills.

Lisa Haayen, a Ph.D. student in cultural anthropology in Dedman College, will compare student retention rates and outcomes at two Vickery Meadows Learning Center sites in West Dallas.

Anders Pedersen, a junior majoring in markets and culture in Dedman College, will go to northern Uganda to work with Elephant Sisters, a fair trade art cooperative, to help build low-cost homes, counsel former child soldiers and teach basic English language skills to children.

Sheba Rasson, a junior psychology and business major, will work in Dallas at Legal Hospice of Texas on client orientation materials and registrations, and will assist with research and preparation of legal documents.

Ablat Turson, a Ph.D. student in biology in Dedman College, will work at International Students Inc. to pair the needs of international students studying at Dallas universities with potential resource-delivery systems.

Applications for Public Service Internships are posted by the Maguire Center in late fall, and the submission deadline is usually early February.

> VIsit the Maguire Center website at smu.edu/ethicscenter

Bob Buford receives ethics award from SMU Feb. 10

Bob BufordBob Buford, whose Halftime organization inspires business and professional leaders to direct their talents toward service, will be honored as recipient of the 2010 J. Erik Jonsson Ethics Award during a noon luncheon Feb. 10 at the Belo Mansion in Dallas.

The award is presented annually by SMU’s Cary Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility to individuals who exemplify the spirit of moral leadership and public virtue.

“The Maguire Center is proud to honor a person whose inspiration and guidance have had such a profound and deep impact on the lives of thousands of others in Dallas and around the world,” said Maguire Center director Tom Mayo. “Bob Buford has dedicated the second half of his career and life to helping others attain ‘lives of significance,’ by which Bob means ‘lives of service.'”

Until the sale of his company in July 1999, Buford served as Chairman of the Board and CEO of Buford Television, Inc., a family owned cable television business. He co-founded Leadership Network in 1984, a non-profit church growth consulting firm, and became founding chairman in 1988 of what is now known as the Leader to Leader Institute, which helps guide managers in social service organizations. In 1995, Buford wrote Halftime, a book on finding fulfillment in the second half of life that grew to an organization bearing the same name.

J. Erik Jonsson was a founder of Texas Instruments, a strong advocate for education and a public-spirited mayor of Dallas from 1964 to 1971. Past winners of the J. Erik Jonsson Award include Ronald G. Steinhart, Michael M. Boone, Zan W. Holmes Jr., Roger Staubach, Caren Prothro, Tom Luce, Ron Anderson, Jack Lowe, Jr., William T. Solomon, Stanley H. Marcus, Charles C. Sprague and Curtis W. Meadows, Jr.

For ticket information, call the Maguire Center at 214-768-4575.

Read more from SMU News

New lecture series explores Holocaust’s lingering impact

'Holocaust Legacies' posterSMU’s Human Rights Education Program is cosponsoring a three-month series of lectures, symposiums, film screenings, photography exhibits and musical performances examining how the Holocaust continues to affect the world.

“Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” begins Sept. 9 with a 7 p.m. reception and a 7:30 p.m. introductory panel discussion in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. The program will run through the end of November with events held both on and off the SMU campus, and all events are free and open to the public.

Panel members on Sept. 9 will include Christopher Anderson, associate professor of sacred music in Perkins School of Theology; Janis Bergman-Carton, art history chair in Meadows School of the Arts; Elliott Dlin, executive director of the Dallas Holocaust Museum; Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Human Rights Education Program and Tom Mayo, director of SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

Halperin, who each December escorts educational groups to former Nazi death camp locations in Poland, is committed to raising awareness of what he calls “the crime within the war,” even as the number of people who lived through the war, and the Holocaust, dwindles with each passing year. September marks the 70th anniversary of the Nazi German invasion of Poland and beginning of World War II.

“It’s safe to say most Americans don’t think about World War II any more,” Halperin said. “We fought the war, defeated the Nazis, and came home the good guys. We mushroomed into a world power. Most Americans since then have lived a relatively safe and comfortable life.”

But the legacy of the Holocaust continues at many levels, Halperin said: The Nazis committed the greatest art theft in history, looting the collections of Jewish families whose descendents are still litigating to see their treasures returned. All major war crime tribunals bear the stamp of the post-World War II Nuremburg Trials, and the United States in May deported a nearly 90-year-old man, John Demjanjuk, for Nazi war crimes.

Halperin noted that in Europe, sensitivity to the Shoah’s legacy is reflected even in restrictions to how people talk and write about the Nazi regime. “You can buy a copy of Adolph Hitler’s Mein Kampf in the SMU Book Store – that’s free speech,” Halperin explained. “You can deny the Holocaust in the U.S., and that’s free speech, too. You can’t do that in Europe.” Halperin said he expects the series to be “a powerful, emotional, somber and sobering series of events.”

Co-sponsors for the 2009 Fall Program Series are SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance, SMU Meadows School of the Arts, SMU Perkins School of Theology, TCU’s Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Social Work and the University of Dallas.

Find a complete schedule at the SMU News site

Faculty in the News: Summer 2009

Brian StumpScientists in SMU’s Seismology Research Program deployed monitoring stations in North Texas during summer 2009 to gather data on a series of earthquakes that began hitting the area in May. Brian Stump (right) and Chris Hayward, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College, are providing expertise to local and national media outlets for ongoing coverage, including the following stories:

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked with the media regarding several state and national political stories during the summer, including:

William LawrenceWilliam Lawrence (right), Dean, Perkins School of Theology, provided commentary on the health care reform debate and other issues, including:

Bruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, spoke with several media outlets about fuel prices, the Congressional climate change bill and other energy issues for these stories:

Scott MacDonald, Southwest Graduate School of Banking, Cox School of Business, talked about distressed banks taking the cost-cutting measure of closing branch locations with CNNMoney.com Aug. 12, 2009.

Ruben Habito, World Religions, Perkins School of Theology, talks about the increasing acceptance of Buddhism among Christians and Jews who infuse Eastern spiritual insights and practices into their own religions with The Denver Post Aug. 9, 2009.

Kathy Hargrove, Gifted Students Institute, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, spoke about the need for specialized training for teachers of the gifted and talented with The Dallas Morning News Aug. 9, 2009.

Al Armendariz, Environmental and Civil Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, discussed air quality problems in Denton County with The Denton Record-Chronicle Aug. 2, 2009. In addition, he wrote an op-ed on the failure of the North Texas clean-air plan and its consequences for The Dallas Morning News, published July 13, 2009.

Jeff TalleyJeff Talley (at right in photo, with Gen. David Petraeus), Environmental and Civil Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, was the subject of a feature detailing his ideas for using engineering to fight global poverty. It appeared in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram July 29, 2009.

Tom Mayo, Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, provided expertise for a story on health care rationing and the author’s 91-year-old father that appeared in Politics Daily July 29, 2009.

William Maxwell, Finance, Cox School of Business, talked about the state of the American auto industry with The Dallas Morning News July 13, 2009.

John Attanasio, Dean, Dedman School of Law, discussed why Dallas’ law practices have managed to avoid the downsizing occurring at many large national practices with The Dallas Morning News July 6, 2009.

Nathan Cortez, Dedman School of Law, discussed the legal and regulatory uncertainties of “medical tourism” – seeking affordable health care abroad – with Diversity: Issues in Higher Education June 25, 2009.

Darab Ganji and Robert Jordan, Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, wrote an op-ed on the post-election uprising in Iran that was published in The Dallas Morning News June 22, 2009.

Fred Schmidt, Christian Spirituality, Perkins School of Theology, discussed the June 2009 meeting of representatives from Episcopal congregations and dioceses to create a new denomination for a story published by The Fort Worth Star-Telegram June 22, 2009.

Glenn Griffin, Advertising, Meadows School of the Arts, discussed the advantages and drawbacks of the state opening its new “Don’t Mess With Texas” video contest to the public with The Dallas Morning News June 17, 2009

Faculty in the News: May 11, 2009

Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the movement to stop President Obama from making the commencement address at Notre Dame with The Associated Press. The resulting article appeared in The Los Angeles Times May 10, 2009.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about incumbents, especially Republicans, in Congress seeking higher office as a path to better opportunities with USA Today May 4, 2009.

James Hollifield, Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, provided expertise on the tight connection between Texas and Mexico in a story about the H1N1 flu’s impact on Mexico’s economy that appeared in The San Francisco Chronicle May 3, 2009.

Tom Mayo, Dedman School of Law and Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, was interviewed for a feature story on Poem In Your Pocket Day that appeared in The Dallas Morning News April 30. 2009. Also featured in the article was SMU senior Jesse Smith, an English/creative writing major in Dedman College.

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