Three named 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors

Tom Mayo

Three named 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors

SMU 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors James Sullivan and Carrie La Ferle with University trustee Ruth Altshuler - fellow recipient Tom Mayo is not pictured

SMU 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors James Sullivan, Art, and Carrie La Ferle, Advertising, celebrate with University Trustee Ruth Altshuler during the May 2012 board meeting. Not pictured: Tom Mayo, Law.

Three of SMU’s best teachers have been named 2012-14 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors, as announced by the University’s Center for Teaching Excellence. This year’s honorees are Carrie La Ferle, Advertising, Meadows School of the Arts; Tom Mayo, Law, Dedman School of Law; and James Sullivan, Art, Meadows School of the Arts.

The new members of SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers will join returning members Marc Christensen, Electrical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; Alyce McKenzie, Homiletics, Perkins School of Theology; and David Son, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Fellow 2011 honoree Greg Warden, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, will become president of Franklin College in Lugano, Switzerland, on July 1.

Each year since 2001, the Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Awards recognize four SMU faculty members for their commitment to and achievements in fostering student learning. “These are faculty whose concerns for higher education go beyond classroom boundaries and often the boundaries of their own discipline,” according to the CTE website. “They represent the highest achievement in reaching the goals of higher education.” The professorships are named for SMU Trustee Ruth Altshuler.

Each recipient receives a $10,000 award and membership in SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers for the two years of their appointment as Altshuler Professors. Members participate actively with other members of the Academy to address issues in classroom teaching.

More about this year’s honored professors under the link.

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May 18, 2012|For the Record, News|

Students, faculty remember Law Professor Daniel Shuman

SMU Law Professor Daniel ShumanDaniel Shuman, M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, will be remembered for his work as a renowned legal scholar, but he was much more to his students.

“He was a caring mentor to so many of us, right up to even the last week of his life,” says Clarence Wilson, who recently achieved a scholarship with Shuman’s help. Shuman, 62, died Tuesday, April 26, 2011 of multiple system atrophy, a rare neurological disorder.

SMU’s Health Law Association (HLA) has announced that it will raise money for a plaque to serve as a lasting tribute to Shuman’s dedication.

Shuman was the inaugural M.D. Anderson Foundation Endowed Professor of Health Law at the law school and a member of the faculty for more than 33 years teaching torts, evidence, law and social science and mental health law.

“The Law School family has suffered a great loss and our thoughts and prayers are with the Shuman family right now,” says Law Dean John B. Attanasio.

Shuman was a nationally and internationally respected scholar in two separate fields, says colleague and HLA advisor Thomas Mayo, associate professor of law. “Early in his career he did groundbreaking empirical research on the attitudes and behaviors of juries, and he followed that with the best research and writing on law and psychiatry anyone has ever done. His productivity and quality were at the highest levels for an incredible three decades.”

Earlier this year, Shuman received the 2011 Manfred S. Guttmacher Award from the American Psychiatric Association (APA). The recognition – shared with psychiatrist Liza Gold – honors their book, Evaluating Mental Health Disability in the Workplace: Model, Process, and Analysis (Springer, 2009), as an “outstanding contribution to the literature of forensic psychiatry.” The award will be presented during the APA’s annual meeting May 14-18 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

“Institutionally, he shaped the present and future course of the law school as the long-time chair of the faculty appointments committee, and he was extremely helpful to the development of our young faculty,” Mayo adds. “Students adored him.”

One of those is Juris Doctor candidate Isaac Haas, who says, “Professor Shuman was passionate about teaching his students to look beyond mere memorization and understanding of the law and consider the consequences of the decisions we make as a community about right and wrong. And while he was a brilliant scholar and writer, what set him apart as a teacher was the interest that he took in me and so many others.

“Very rarely would I ever leave a conversation with Professor Shuman without him asking about my other classes, job prospects, wife or son,” Haas says. “I am incredibly grateful for the time I spent with him, and with his wife, Emily, as a student, teaching assistant and friend.”

The family has requested that memorials be made to the Texas Voice Project for Parkinson Disease.

To contribute to the HLA’s memorial gift for Shuman, contact Alex Berk.

Written by Denise Gee

May 2, 2011|News|

Rita Kirk becomes new director of SMU’s Maguire Ethics Center

Rita Kirk, the new director of SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, says she is committed to making ethics a continuing conversation on the SMU campus.

“One of the goals of the Maguire Center is to provoke conversation both in class and out so that ethics becomes a central point of discussion in our daily lives,” she said. “SMU is fortunate to have the Maguire Center. The range of programs, speakers, and internships is impressive, yet awareness among students of ways to engage with the Center can be greatly enhanced. I look forward to working with SMU and its extended community.”

Kirk defines ethics as a lifelong struggle to live intentionally and to define who you are.

The center supports student and faculty ethics-related education and activities, as well as community outreach to private and public institutions in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The center was funded in 1995 by an endowment of $2.5 million from its namesake, Cary Maguire.

A professor in the Division of Corporate Communications and Public Affairs in the Meadows School of the Arts, Kirk became director of the Maguire Center on Jan. 1, 2011, taking over from Tom Mayo, associate professor in the Dedman School of Law. Mayo, a medical ethicist, has guided the program for five and a half years. In addition to his faculty position at SMU, Mayo is an adjunct associate professor of internal medicine at UT-Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

“Ethical challenges surround students everywhere and all the time – in their clubs and organizations, in their personal relationships, in their dealings with teachers and classmates,” Mayo said. “I believe the first and often hardest step most of us are challenged to take is to realize that our choices are ethical ones in the first place.”

Click the YouTube screen above for Rita Kirk’s comments on the usefulness of ethics. Click this link to open the Rita Kirk video in a new window. video

> Read more from SMU News

February 8, 2011|News|

Faculty in the News: Oct. 5, 2010

Metin Eren, a graduate student in archaeology in Dedman College, says trampling by animals may skew the dates on stone artifacts. An article on his research was published in National Geographic Daily News Sept. 29, 2010.

James Guthrie, George W. Bush Institute senior fellow and professor in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, wrote an op-ed on education issues raised by the recent film “Waiting for Superman” that was published in The Christian Science Monitor Sept. 29, 2010. He and David Chard, dean of the Simmons School, provided commentary for an article on a Bush Institute initiative to improve the performance of school principals, in which SMU will participate. The story was published by The Associated Press Sept. 29, 2010.

Tom Mayo, Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, talked about the practice of parents selecting the gender of their children prior to birth with NBC 5 News Sept. 23, 2010. video

October 5, 2010|Faculty in the News|

Seven students named Maguire and Irby Family Public Service interns

Maguire Center graphicSeven SMU students have been named Maguire and Irby Family Public Service Interns, earning positions in a 14-year-old program that provides summer stipends for public service volunteer work and research.

The interns will work in a variety of programs as far away as Angola and Nicaragua, and as close as Austin and Dallas. The program, sponsored by SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and the Irby Family Foundation, has supported volunteers in 13 states, and 11 countries outside the USA and in more than 100 agencies in Texas.

“We approved grants for more international internships this year than last and continue to see more proposals from graduate students,” said Thomas Mayo, Maguire Center director. “The graduate students, in particular, clearly see these internships as an opportunity to use their advanced studies in a new, nonprofit context that benefits the communities where they will serve. All the students, though, will have potentially life-altering experiences, and the Maguire Center is pleased to help make that happen.”

The 2010 interns and their projects:

Shay Cannedy, an anthropology graduate student in Dedman College, will work with the Green Leaf Program at Refugee Services of Texas Inc. in Austin to develop marriage education classes and help develop a program evaluation system.

John Duvenci, a combined undergraduate/graduate student in the Lyle School of Engineering, will work with Living Water International in Luanda, Angola, to develop a water treatment system for an orphanage.

Kendra Eaton, a junior majoring in markets and culture in Dedman College, will work with Fundacion A. Jean Brugger in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua, tutoring students in English and teaching both art appreciation for children and workshops to help enhance local residents’ computer skills.

Lisa Haayen, a Ph.D. student in cultural anthropology in Dedman College, will compare student retention rates and outcomes at two Vickery Meadows Learning Center sites in West Dallas.

Anders Pedersen, a junior majoring in markets and culture in Dedman College, will go to northern Uganda to work with Elephant Sisters, a fair trade art cooperative, to help build low-cost homes, counsel former child soldiers and teach basic English language skills to children.

Sheba Rasson, a junior psychology and business major, will work in Dallas at Legal Hospice of Texas on client orientation materials and registrations, and will assist with research and preparation of legal documents.

Ablat Turson, a Ph.D. student in biology in Dedman College, will work at International Students Inc. to pair the needs of international students studying at Dallas universities with potential resource-delivery systems.

Applications for Public Service Internships are posted by the Maguire Center in late fall, and the submission deadline is usually early February.

> VIsit the Maguire Center website at smu.edu/ethicscenter

May 12, 2010|News|
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