Meadows students dominate 2011 Dallas ADDY® Awards

Temerlin Advertising Institute

Meadows students dominate 2011 Dallas ADDY® Awards

1E81A04EC4754F2E8F7EC6A402C685F9.ashx Students in the Temerlin Advertising Institute in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts took top honors in the Student division of the 2011 American Advertising Federation ADDY® Awards local competition, hosted by the Dallas Ad League Feb. 17 at Edison’s in Dallas.

The ADDY® Award program is the world’s largest advertising competition, with more than 40,000 entries annually in student and professional categories. The contest is unique among advertising creative competitions in that it includes three levels of judging: local, regional and national. Winning an ADDY® at each level qualifies the work to progress to the next higher level.

SMU students won 10 awards in six categories, including six bronze, two silver and two gold.

“SMU’s standing as a true creative bright spot has now been proven with the hardest-to-reach and most competitive part of the advertising and design industries – the creative competitions,” said Patty Alvey, distinguished chair and director of the Temerlin Advertising Institute. “[This] was a wonderful endorsement of the accomplishments of our faculty and students.”

> Read more from SMU News
> Visit SMU’s Temerlin Advertising Institute online

March 2, 2011|News|

SMU unveils new plan for ‘Unbridled Learning’

Outdoor class at Dallas HallSMU is answering students’ calls for learning opportunities outside the classroom with a new program that will provide both structure and funding for their endeavors.

The University’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) – “Unbridled Learning: Engaged Learning Beyond the Classroom” – will allow all SMU undergraduate students to participate in at least one extensive experiential learning activity prior to graduation, according to the plan released by SMU’s QEP Committee. It also meets requirements for the University’s upcoming reaccreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).

The program will allow undergraduates to “build on their formal classroom education through participation in structured experiential learning beyond the classroom, which will help them to develop a significant and sophisticated understanding of the ways in which the context of the world community intersects with disciplinary knowledge,” according to the QEP Committee’s executive summary.

The committee’s discussions have centered on experiential learning since its formation in summer 2009, says chair Maggie Dunham, professor of computer science and engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering.

“The QEP part of our reaccreditation process is pretty much wide open for schools to determine. The committee’s main job was to come up with an implementation plan,” Dunham says. “Experiential learning is the area where we think students will gain the most from their University experience. They value this kind of activity and have told us as much.”

Indeed, a survey of SMU students conducted by the Temerlin Advertising Institute, led by Professor Brice Campbell, in Meadows School of the Arts found that more than 80 percent of them “find that it is important to experience life outside the classroom.”

The QEP will provide opportunities – and University support, including funding – for undergraduate students to choose an out-of-classroom experiential learning activity in the community focus area of their choice:

  • Research
  • Creative
  • Civic
  • Professional

QEP experiences will also have specific requirements that may not be satisfied by existing SMU experiential learning activities, according to the committee. A key feature is that each student will be in charge of identifying, defining, completing and reporting on his or her work.

All experiences will be approved by an advisory committee and overseen by SMU faculty with other qualified internal and external mentors. A QEP experience can be undertaken anywhere, but must include extensive involvement with a learning community.

All QEP participants will be required to write a reflective article about their experiences, to be published in a new SMU online journal. In addition, new Undergraduate Engaged Learning Conferences will be held annually to showcase student QEP experiences.

The committee found that many SMU students already pursue experiential activities beyond the classroom, but many more are confused about how to go about doing it, Dunham says. The recommendations for the QEP grant program and other support mechanisms should address that problem, she adds.

SMU institutional support for the QEP will include:

  • Monetary support
  • A new position for a Director of Engaged Learning
  • A new Director of Undergraduate Research

The oversight infrastructure will include the Engaged Learning Advisory Committee, as well as community partners and mentors, and a new website to keep track of experiential learning opportunities for students.

In addition, QEP projects will build on and augment important elements of the new University Curriculum (UC), to be offered beginning in 2012. The program will allow students to pursue the community and global requirements of the UC in more depth.

Finally, the QEP will increase faculty awareness of the importance of and participation in undergraduate experiential learning outside the classroom.

“It’s important that these experiences become part of our University culture,” Dunham says. “Our plan will help facilitate that.”

> Read more about the University Curriculum
> Learn more from SMU’s Quality Enhancement Plan information site
> Visit the SACS Reaffirmation of Accreditation for SMU homepage

January 27, 2011|News|

‘A Clear Vision’ propels SMU’s 2010 United Way Campaign

United 2020 graphicSMU has embraced the theme of “A Clear Vision – Education, Income, Health” as part of the University’s 2010 United Way fund-raising drive. This year’s goal is $75,000, and the campaign continues through Dec. 31.

“Education, Income, Health” reflects the three pillars of United 2020, the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas’ ambitious set of goals for the next 10 years. The agency’s blue ribbon commission – which includes Geoffrey Orsak, dean of SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering – wants to prepare 50 percent more students to succeed in college, move 250,000 additional people out of poverty permanently, and improve community health through expanded access, preventive care and healthy behaviors, according to the United 2020 website.

> Learn more about United 2020

The initiative’s name encompasses both the target year and the idea of clear vision, says Jeff Strese, director of SMU Human Resources and the 2010 United Way campaign co-chair. The campaign is asking SMU community members to contribute $2 per week toward its goal.

“The United Way has helped us understand the impact that figure can have in practical terms,” Strese says. “Two dollars can provide baby formula for a family, or tax and financial counseling for persons that qualify.”

> Watch the United 2020 video

Currently SMU ranks 101st in total campaign contributions among more than 1,000 organizations in the North Texas area. The campaign chair hope to propel the University into the top 100 with the 2010 effort.

The campaign will continue to find ways to increase student involvement, say Strese and faculty co-chair Steve Edwards, associate professor in SMU’s Temerlin Advertising Institute, Meadows School of the Arts. Last year, SMU community members had the option to contribute by adding $1, $5 or more to on-campus transactions using Pony Express, a credit card or cash.

“We saw increases in giving from that,” Strese says. This year, he adds, the campaign will engage the Greek community and other student organizations by encouraging them to raise at least $25 each.

Campaign organizers are also planning to extend the University’s involvement into the spring. The Wellpower program will sponsor a University 5K walk/run to benefit the United Way, scheduled to take place in spring 2011.

> Visit SMU’s United Way homepage

Faculty and staff members may make a one-time gift or a choose a monthly payroll deduction. Donations can also be added to purchases at the following campus locations:

  • Einstein Bros. Bagels, Fincher Building
  • Java City, all locations
  • Mac’s Place, McElvaney Hall
  • Mane Course (Chick-fil-A, Pizza Hut, Subway), Hughes-Trigg Student Center
  • The Market & Montague’s, Hughes-Trigg Student Center
  • Meadows Cart (Starbucks), Owen Arts Center
  • RFoC @ Lee, Umphrey Lee Center
  • SMUothies, Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports

> Learn more from the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas

November 2, 2010|News|

For the Record: Feb. 5, 2010

Robin Lovin, Cary Maguire University Professor of Ethics, was co-speaker (with Victor Anderson of the Vanderbilt Divinity School) in the Douglas Sturm Dialogue, “Justice, Reparation, and Forgiveness: Finding a Moral Vocabulary for America’s Racial Future,” which took place Feb. 4, 2010 at Bucknell University. The Sturm Dialogue, which features two distinguished thinkers in ethics and social justice, is sponsored by Bucknell’s departments of religion and political science and Social Justice College, and held in honor of Bucknell emeritus professor of religion Douglas Sturm.

Alice Kendrick, Temerlin Advertising Institute, Meadows School of the Arts, has been elected to the National Advertising Review Board. The NARB is a 70-member appeals board that is part of the National Advertising Review Council, which was established in 1971 to provide guidance and set standards of truth and accuracy for national advertisers. Kendrick is one of 10 members of the public and academia on the NARB.

Jason McKenna, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College, has received the U.S. Department of Defense’s highest award for civilian career employees. As a senior research geophysicist at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center, he became one of 6 recipients of the Department of Defense’s Distinguished Civilian Service Award in December. He received the honor for his “contributions to the safety and welfare of defense personnel worldwide” through his work in research and development of products for detecting and defeating clandestine tunneling to ensure security at U.S. borders. Read more from The Vicksburg Post.

Santanu Roy, Economics, Dedman College, received a 2009 Annual Award for Outstanding Contribution to Education from the Greater Dallas Indo-American Chamber of Commerce. The award was presented by Meera Shankar, ambassador of the Republic of India to the United States, during a banquet Dec. 10 at The Westin Galleria in Dallas.

February 5, 2010|For the Record|

Faculty in the News: Jan. 26, 2010

Dan Howard, Marketing, Cox School of Business, discussed the results of American Airlines’ unprecedented product-placement deal with the Paramount Pictures film “Up in the Air” in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram Jan. 25, 2010.

David Chard, Dean, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, discussed the trend of teachers selling their lesson plans online with The Dallas Morning News Jan. 24, 2010.

Michael Cox, O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom, Cox School of Business, discussed the possibility of increased federal taxes to pay down the national debt with The Dallas Morning News Jan. 24, 2010.

Tom Fomby, Economics, Dedman College, talked about the details of Wal-Mart Stores Inc.’s announcement that it will cut more than 11,000 jobs with The Dallas Business Journal Jan. 25, 2010.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about the fallout from the Republican senatorial victory in Massachusetts for a Canadian Press story that appeared in Yahoo! News Jan. 20, 2010. He also discussed the Texas Green Party’s hopes for a revival with The Fort Worth Star-Telegram Jan. 18, 2010.

Brice Campbell, Temerlin Advertising Institute, Meadows School of the Arts, discussed the U.S. Census Bureau’s advertising campaign to boost its 2010 survey response with HispanicBusiness.com Jan. 18, 2010.

January 26, 2010|Faculty in the News|
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