Tate Student Forum

SMU’s 2016-17 Tate Lecture Series opens Tuesday, Sept. 20 with Doris Kearns Goodwin, Tom Brokaw and David Gergen

Tom Brokaw, Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Gergen Tate Lecture Series 2016-17

Presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin and veteran journalist Tom Brokaw return to SMU Tuesday, Sept. 20 to kick off the 35th season of SMU’s Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series.

Goodwin and Brokaw will offer their insights on the historic 2016 U.S. election, moderated by political analyst and Tate Series veteran David Gergen. The trio will deliver The Linda and Mitch Hart Lecture program at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Doris Kearns Goodwin by Eric Levin

Doris Kearns Goodwin | Photo credit: Eric Levin

After earning a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University, Doris Kearns Goodwin began her career as an assistant to President Lyndon Johnson in his last year in the White House. She later assisted President Johnson in preparation of his memoirs.

As a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer of historical biographies, Goodwin has won praise for her meticulous, in-depth research and ability to chronicle both the public and private lives of her subjects. She has written six New York Times best-selling books.

Goodwin also worked with Steven Spielberg and DreamWorks Studio to create the film Lincoln, based in part on her award-winning Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. The film grossed $275 million at the box office and earned 12 Academy Award nominations.

> Follow Doris Kearns Goodwin on Twitter @DorisKGoodwin

Tom Brokaw

Tom Brokaw

Tom Brokaw is best known as the anchor and managing editor of “NBC Nightly News” from 1982 to 2004. He has covered the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Challenger space-shuttle disaster, the 1989 Lorna Prieta earthquake, Hurricane Andrew and the 9/11 terror attacks. He now serves as a special correspondent for NBC News and can be heard every weekday on his radio segment, An American Story, on iHeartRadio.

In addition, Brokaw is the best-selling author of The Greatest GenerationThe Time of Our Lives: A Conversation About America, and A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope. His many awards and honors include several Emmys and Peabody Awards, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for excellence in broadcast journalism, the Al Neuharth Award for Excellence in Media, and the Four Freedoms Award.

Brokaw was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2005 and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2014. He received his B.A. degree in political science from the University of South Dakota.

> Follow Tom Brokaw on Twitter @TomBrokaw

David Gergen

David Gergen

David Gergen is a senior political analyst for CNN, as well as professor of public service and co-director of the Center for Public Leadership in Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

In 1971, Gergen joined the Nixon White House as a staff assistant to a speech writing team and went on to presidential advisor for four former presidents. In addition to his political work, he was an officer in the U.S. Navy, worked at U.S. News & World Report and appeared on the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour. Gergen graduated with honors from both Yale University and Harvard Law School.

> Follow David Gergen on Twitter @David_Gergen

All SMU students, faculty and staff are invited to the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m., and seats may be reserved online.

The evening lecture is sold out. However, SMU students can go to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-serve basis.

> Learn more about the 35th Tate Distinguished Lecture Series
> For additional information, e-mail the Tate Series

SMU Tate Series to feature two political legends May 2, 2016

Veteran journalist Jim Lehrer will moderate a discussion between political legends James Carville and Karl Rove for the The Ebby Halliday Companies Lecture of SMU’s Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series Monday, May 2.

All SMU student, faculty and staff are invited to the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum segment at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Admission is free, doors open at 4 p.m. and seats may be reserved online.

Tickets to the Ebby Halliday Companies lecture are sold out. However, SMU students can go to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-serve basis. The lecture will begin at 8 p.m.

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James Caravelle

JAMES CARVILLE is a Democratic political consultant who led Bill Clinton’s successful 1992 presidential campaign. He previously managed several gubernatorial and senatorial campaigns. Recently, he has moved beyond domestic politics to manage political campaigns in more than 20 countries around the world.

Tate-karl-rove

Karl Rove

KARL ROVE is a Republican political strategist known as the architect of George W. Bush’s 2000 and 2004 presidential campaigns. He served as Senior Advisor to President Bush from 2000–07 and as Deputy Chief of Staff from 2004–07.

tate-jim-lehrer

Jim Lehrer

JIM LEHRER, moderator, spent more than 35 years as a television host for PBS and is best known as the host of PBS NEWSHOUR. Along with hosting PBS’ nightly news program, Lehrer has moderated 12 nationally televised debates in the past seven presidential elections, earning him the moniker “Dean of Moderators.”

For additional information: contact the SMU Tate Series.

Actor Rob Lowe to deliver SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016

LoweRob Lowe, actor, producer, writer, director and activist, will be the featured speaker at The Tolleson Lecture of the Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series at SMU Tuesday, Feb. 23. The Tolleson Lecture will begin at 8 p.m. Tuesday in SMU’s McFarlin Auditorium, 6405 Boaz Lane.

Lowe is a highly acclaimed actor who has made his mark in both television and film. He began his acting career in the TV series “A New Kind of Family” in 1979-80. He received his first Golden Globe Award nomination for his supporting actor role in the 1983 TV film Thursday’s Child. Also in 1983, Lowe made his feature film debut in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Outsiders. Subsequent feature films include Wayne’s World, Tommy Boy and Thank You for Smoking.

Lowe’s fan base expanded significantly with his role in the hit TV drama “The West Wing” from 1999-2003. That series brought him two Screen Actors Guild awards and nominations for Emmy and Golden Globe awards. Following “The West Wing,” Lowe starred in the TV series “Brothers and Sisters” from 2007-10 and “Parks and Recreation” from 2010-15. His portrayal of President John F. Kennedy in the 2013 television movie Killing Kennedy was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award. Currently, Lowe plays the lead role in the Fox comedy “The Grinder,” which debuted in September 2015.

In addition to his acting, Lowe has credits as a producer, writer and director. He also is an activist for breast cancer awareness. He has written two books: his 2011 New York Times best-seller, Stories I Only Tell My Friends: An Autobiography; and Love Life, published in 2014. Lowe lives in California.

Follow Rob Lowe on Twitter @RobLowe

All SMU community members are invited to hear Lowe speak and answer questions at the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m. Please tweet your questions for the forum to #SMUtate.

Students can go to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-served basis.

> Follow the Tate Series on social media: Twitter – @SMUtate | Instagram – @smutate

Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns returns to SMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015

Ken BurnsRenowned director and documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, creator of Baseball, The War and The Roosevelts, will return to SMU Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015 for another engagement with the Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. Burns will present The Oncor Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium

Burns has been making documentary films for almost 40 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has directed and produced some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made, including The Civil War; Baseball; Jazz; The Statue of Liberty; Huey Long; Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery; Frank Lloyd Wright; Mark Twain; Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson; The War; The National Parks: America’s Best Idea; The Roosevelts: An Intimate History; and, most recently, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies.

> Learn more about Ken Burns’ work at his website: KenBurns.com

In 2009, David Zurawik of The Baltimore Sun said, “Ken Burns is not only the greatest documentarian of the day, but also the most influential filmmaker, period. That includes feature filmmakers like George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. I say that because Burns not only turned millions of persons on to history with his films, he showed us a new way of looking at our collective past and ourselves.” The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.”

His future projects include films on Jackie Robinson, the Vietnam War, the history of country music, Ernest Hemingway and the history of stand-up comedy.

Burns’ films have been honored with dozens of major awards, including 13 Emmy Awards, two Grammy Awards and two Oscar nominations. In 2008, at the News & Documentary Emmy Awards, Ken Burns was honored by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

This is Burns’ second visit to SMU to deliver a Tate Distinguished Lecture. Previously, he spoke during the 2004-05 series.

> Follow Ken Burns on Twitter: @KenBurns

All SMU community members are invited to the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m. Please tweet your questions for the forum to #SMUtate.

Tickets for the evening are sold out. However, students can go to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-served basis.

> Follow the Tate Series on social media: Twitter – @SMUtate | Instagram – @smutate

Krauthammer, Moyers close 2011-12 Tate season May 1

Award-winning journalists and commentators Charles Krauthammer and Bill Moyers visit SMU May 1 for the final event of the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series season. They will give the Gregg and Molly Engles Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Charles KrauthammerWinner of the Pulitzer Prize and named by The Financial Times as the most influential commentator in America, Charles Krauthammer has received honors for his writing from every part of the political spectrum, including People for the American Way’s First Amendment Award and the Bradley Foundation’s Bradley Prize. Since 1985, he has written a syndicated column for The Washington Post, for which he won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary. It is published weekly in more than 240 newspapers worldwide.

Krauthammer is a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington. He is also a contributor to FOX News, appearing nightly on FOX’s evening program, Special Report with Bret Baier.

Follow Charles Krauthammer on Twitter @krauthammer

Bill MoyersA survey of television critics by Television Quarterly, the official journal of The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, placed Bill Moyers among the 10 journalists who have had the most significant influence on television news. He has received more than 30 Emmy Awards for excellence and 2 prestigious Gold Baton awards, the highest honor of the Alfred I. duPont Columbia University Award. He has also won 9 Peabody Awards and 3 George Polk Awards, including the Career Achievement Award.

Before establishing Public Affairs Television in 1986, Moyers served as executive editor of Bill Moyers’ Journal on public television, senior news analyst for the CBS Evening News, and chief correspondent for the acclaimed documentary series CBS Reports. Two of his public television series, Creativity (1982) and A Walk Through the 20th Century (1984), were named Outstanding Informational Series by the Academy of Arts and Sciences. With his wife and partner, Public Affairs Television President Judith Davidson Moyers, he has produced hundreds of hours of programming for public television. Currently, he is the host of Moyers & Company.

Follow Bill Moyers on Twitter @billmoyers

Krauthammer and Moyers will answer questions from SMU community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. May 1 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask the speakers a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #TateSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

The Tate Series’ 2012-13 season will be announced at the evening event, which is sold out. Watch the SMU Forum for more information after the announcement, and learn more at smu.edu/tateseries.

Walter Isaacson to give Tate Lecture at SMU March 27, 2012

Walter IsaacsonWalter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute and author of a best-selling biography of the late Steve Jobs, comes to SMU March 27 as part of the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Lacerte Family Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

As chief executive of the Aspen Institute, Isaacson leads the senior management of the nonpartisan educational and policy studies institute based in Washington, D.C. He also serves as chairman of the board of Teach for America, which recruits recent college graduates to teach in underserved communities.

Follow Walter Isaacson on Twitter @walterisaacson

Isaacson’s most recent book, Steve Jobs, was published by Simon & Schuster in October 2011, mere days after the inventor’s death from pancreatic cancer. It was named one of the “Best Books of 2011” by Amazon.com, where it also became the best-selling book of that year. In addition, it topped the New York Times nonfiction best-seller list for nine weeks and has remained on the chart continuously for 21 weeks as of the April 1, 2012 list.

Other books by Isaacson include Einstein: His Life and Universe (2007), Benjamin Franklin: An American Life (2003), and Kissinger: A Biography (1992). In addition, he was coauthor with Evan Thomas of The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made (1986).

Isaacson began his career at The Sunday Times of London and then worked for The New Orleans Times-Picayune/States-Item. He joined TIME in 1978 and served as a political correspondent, national editor, and editor of new media before becoming the magazine’s 14th editor in 1996. Isaacson became chairman and CEO of CNN in 2001 and president and CEO of the Aspen Institute in 2003.

He was appointed by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as the chairman of the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which oversees Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, and other international broadcasts of the United States, a position he held until 2012. For two years after Hurricane Katrina, from 2005-07, Isaacson served as vice-chair of the Louisiana Recovery Authority.

Currently, Isaacson is vice-chair of Partners for a New Beginning, a public-private group tasked with forging ties between the United States and the Muslim world. In addition, he serves on the boards of United Airlines and Tulane University, as well as the Board of Overseers of Harvard University.

A New Orleans native, Isaacson is a graduate of Harvard College and of Pembroke College of Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He lives with his wife and daughter in Washington, D.C.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Isaacson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. March 27 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Isaacson a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #IsaacsonSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

Food & culture writer Michael Pollan to give Tate Lecture March 1

Author and essayist Michael PollanMichael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and other bestsellers about “the places where food and culture intersect,” visits SMU March 1 as the next speaker in the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Oncor Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

For more than 20 years, Pollan has been writing books and articles about the places where the human and natural worlds meet: food, agriculture, gardens, drugs and architecture. He wrote the bestsellers In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto and The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, which was named one of the 10 best books of 2006 by The New York Times and The Washington Post. It also won the California Book Award and the James Beard Award for best food writing, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

> Follow Michael Pollan on Twitter @michaelpollan

Pollan’s previous book, The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World, was also a New York Times bestseller, received the Borders Original Voices Award for the best non-fiction work of 2001, and was recognized as one of the best books of the year by the American Booksellers Association and Amazon.com. PBS premiered a two-hour special documentary based on The Botany of Desire in fall 2009. His most recent book is Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, which was an immediate # 1 New York Times bestseller upon publication.

A contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine since 1987, Pollan has received numerous writing awards, including the James Beard Award for best magazine series in 2003; the John Burroughs Prize for best natural history essay in 1997; the QPB New Vision Award for his first book, Second Nature (1991); the 2000 Reuters-I.U.C.N. Global Award for Environmental Journalism for his reporting on genetically modified crops; and the 2003 Humane Society of the United States’ Genesis Award for his writing on animal agriculture. His articles have appeared in Harper’s (where he served for many years as executive editor), Mother Jones, Gourmet, Vogue, Travel + Leisure, Gardens Illustrated and The Nation.

In 2010, Pollan was named to the TIME Magazine “TIME 100” in the Thinkers category. In 2009 he was named one of the top 10 “New Thought Leaders” by Newsweek magazine.

In 2003, Pollan was appointed the John S. and James L. Knight Professor of Journalism at UC-Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, and the director of the Knight Program in Science and Environmental Journalism. In addition to teaching, he lectures widely on food, agriculture and gardening.

Pollan grew up on Long Island and was educated at Bennington College, Oxford University, and Columbia University, from which he received a Master’s degree in English. He lives in the Bay Area with his wife, the painter Judith Belzer, and their son, Isaac.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Pollan will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. March 1 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Pollan a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #PollanSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

Dead Aid author Dambisa Moyo to give 2011-12 Tate Lecture Feb. 6

Author and international economist Dambisa MoyoInternational economist Dambisa Moyo, one of TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2009, visits campus Monday, Feb. 6, to deliver the Anita and Truman Arnold Lecture in SMU’s 2011-12 Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. Her talk begins at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Moyo is the author of the New York Times bestseller Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa. She argues that financial aid, rather than helping Africa, has actually harmed it and should be phased out. Instead, she offers proposals for developing countries to finance their own development. Her latest book, How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly and the Stark Choices Ahead, is now available.

In 2009, Moyo was named one of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World” by TIME Magazine and was nominated to the World Economic Forum’s Young Global Leaders Forum. Her writing regularly appears in economic and finance-related publications such as the Financial Times, the Economist and The Wall Street Journal. In addition, she has appeared as a guest on CNN, CNBC,  the BBC and Fox Business Network, among others.

Moyo is a patron of Absolute Return for Kids (ARK), a hedge fund supporting children’s charity, and serves on the Board of Directors of Room to Read, a San Francisco-based nonprofit that provides educational opportunities to local communities in the developing world.

A native of Lusaka, Zambia, Moyo earned her Ph.D. degree in economics from Oxford University and holds a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She completed a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry and an M.B.A. in finance at American University in Washington, D.C.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Moyo will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 6 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Moyo a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #MoyoSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

Moneyball author Michael Lewis to give 2012 Tate Lecture Jan. 24

Michael Lewis, author of 'Moneyball,' 'The Blind Side' and 'Boomerang'Financial journalist and best-selling author Michael Lewis – whose books became the Oscar-nominated films Moneyball and The Blind Side – visits the Hilltop Tuesday, Jan. 24, to deliver the Omni Hotels Lecture in SMU’s 2011-12 Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. The event begins at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

All tickets to the previously scheduled Meg Whitman Tate Lecture from Oct. 18, 2011, will be honored at the Michael Lewis lecture.

Lewis is a regular contributor to The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Slate and Bloomberg. His latest book, Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World (2011), is based on articles he wrote for Vanity Fair on the debt crisis in Greece, Iceland and Germany. It captures the financial madness on both sides of the Atlantic during the past decade as individuals, institutions and entire nations embraced instant gratification over long-term planning. The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine (2010) analyzes the freefall of the U.S. economy and the heroes and villains that drove it overboard.

As an author, Lewis first made a name for himself in 1989 with Liar’s Poker: Rising Through the Wreckage of Wall Street, an inside look at his career as a bond trader. Author Tom Wolfe called it “the funniest book on Wall Street I’ve ever read,” and the book also earned Lewis the label of “America’s poet laureate of capital” from The Los Angeles TimesLiar’s Poker spent 62 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

Lewis also examined the 1980s’ get-rich-quick jungle in The Money Culture (1992), chronicled the 1996 presidential campaign in Losers: The Road to Everyplace but the White House, and explored the internet boom in Next: The Future Just Happened (2002).

His 2003 bestseller, Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, examined the effect an innovative personnel approach has had in allowing the small-budget Oakland Athletics to consistently rank among baseball’s best teams. Moneyball became a major motion picture in 2011 starring Brad Pitt and holds the record for the largest opening weekend for a baseball movie ever. (On the morning of Lewis’ Tate Lecture, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced that the film had been nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture.)

In 2006, Lewis wrote The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game, which tells the true story of Baltimore Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher. The 2009 film adaptation – starring Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw and Kathy Bates (’69) – broke the box office record for the biggest opening weekend of a sports film in history. It was also nominated for Best Picture and won Bullock a Best Actress trophy in the Academy Awards. His 2009 book, Home Game: An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood, is a compilation of stories he wrote for his column “Dad Again” in Slate, detailing the parenting realities he encountered with the births of his children.

A native of New Orleans, Lewis graduated from Princeton University with a degree in art history and earned his Master’s at The London School of Economics. Before he began his writing career, he worked with The Salomon Brothers on Wall Street and in London. He lives in Berkeley with his wife, former MTV News correspondent Tabitha Soren, and their three children.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Lewis will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 24 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The event is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries