Student Affairs

Save the date: SMU Honors Day 2015 is Monday, April 13

SMU Honors Convocation 2013 procession

Honors Convocation 2013. Photo credit: SMU/Kim Ritzenthaler

SMU celebrates high achievement in academics and community life during Honors Day 2015 on Monday, April 13. The 18th Honors Convocation begins at 5:30 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium, and the 2015 Awards Extravaganza takes place at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

SMU reserves one Monday each April to celebrate the achievements of students, faculty, staff members, trustees and administrators in the two ceremonies. The Honors Convocation recognizes academic achievement at the University and department levels.

SMU’s 2015 Honors Convocation award and honors recipients

Brian W. Stump, Albritton Professor of Geological Sciences and AAAS Fellow, SMU

Brian Stump, SMU’s Claude C. Albritton Jr. Chair in Geological Sciences

Brian Stump, Claude C. Albritton Jr. Chair in Earth Sciences in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, will be the convocation speaker. An expert in seismic wave propagation and earthquake source theory, Stump has become well known in North Texas for his continuing research on the increasing occurrences of small earthquakes that have shaken the area since 2008.

But his work in detecting ground motion from explosions has for more than 20 years helped the United States government in ensuring that the world’s nuclear powers abide by their agreements related to underground nuclear testing. He served as scientific adviser to the U.S. delegation to the Conference on Disarmament from 1994 through 1996 and continues to be called upon frequently to assist the U.S. government in the interpretation of seismic and acoustic data.

In November 2014, Stump was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for distinguished contributions to his field, particularly in the area of seismic monitoring in support of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. He is the fifth SMU professor to receive this honor.

Retired and current faculty will assemble for Honors Convocation in academic dress no later than 5:10 p.m. in the Perkins Administration Building lobby and will process together to McFarlin Auditorium. A reception will immediately follow the ceremony in the Dallas Hall Quadrangle.

Watch SMU’s Honors Convocation via live streaming Monday, April 13 at smu.edu/live

Participating faculty members may RSVP online. Faculty members with questions regarding the procession can send an e-mail to ceremonies@smu.edu or call 214-768-3417.

Later, the University presents several awards for excellence – including its highest honor, the “M” Award – during the 2015 Awards Extravaganza at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballrooms. Awards Extravaganza honorees will be listed in SMU Forum the day after the ceremony.

Find more information on Honors Convocation: smu.edu/honorsday
Learn more about the Awards Extravaganza from SMU Student Life

SMU celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month 2014

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From mid-September through mid-October, SMU joins the nation in celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month by recognizing the contributions, culture and heritage of Hispanic Americans.

Hispanic Heritage Month was first approved in 1968 by President Lyndon B. Johnson as a 7-day observation. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan expanded the recognition to cover a 30-day period. Coinciding with independence anniversaries of seven Latin American countries, Hispanic Heritage Month begins on Sept. 15 and is celebrated through Oct. 15.

Viva 2014 Viva America: Hispanic Heritage Month Kick-Off

SMU kicks off Hispanic Heritage Month with Viva America on Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 7 p.m. in the Van Meter Performance Plaza outside of Mustang Band Hall.  Co-hosted by SMU Multicultural Student Affairs and College Hispanic American Students, Viva America is an outdoor festival celebrating all Hispanic cultures. Beginning with a flag ceremony, the festival also includes a DJ, live cultural performances, Latin food, aguas frescas and dancing.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact SMU Multicultural Student Affairs.

 

Hispanic Heritage MOnth 2014

Additional activities celebrating Hispanic heritage, culture and contributions include:

  • Sept. 23: Voter Registration: The Sleeping Giant (11 a.m. – 1 p.m.)
  • Sept. 28: Fiesta Latino Americano (11 a.m. – 7 p.m.)
  • Oct. 4: Service Day (TBA)
  • Oct. 10: LULAC in the Community (TBA)
  • Oct. 22: Cesar Chavez Movie (7:30 p.m.)
  • Oct. 26: La Familia Luncheon (1 p.m.)

SMU celebrates 2014 Constitution Day Wednesday, Sept. 17

SMU Constitution Day 2014 flyerSMU celebrates good citizenship with food, fun and prizes at the 2014 Constitution Day observance 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons.

The event is cosponsored by the Office of the ProvostCentral University LibrariesHughes-Trigg Student Center and the Office of Student Affairs.

Food and refreshments will be served; other highlights include a U.S. Constitution trivia game, with prizes awarded for correct answers.

The U.S. Constitution defines the structure of the legislative, judicial and executive branches of the federal government, as well as the duties, limitations of power and interaction of each with the others. The Constitution also defines the rights of individual citizens in the Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the document.

Constitution Day – also known as Citizenship Day – commemorates the ratification of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, and recognizes all who are born in the United States or who have become naturalized citizens. The federal law establishing the observance was created in 2004.

For the latest information, contact Lisa O’Donnell in the Provost’s Office and follow @SMUConstDay on Twitter.

Visit the U.S. Constitution’s official homepage at the National Archives
Find educational resources at the National Constitution Center homepage
Learn more about the observance and its history at ConstitutionDay.com
Read primary documents in American history at the Library of Congress website

SMU celebrates Constitution Day 2013 with food, prizes

'Scene at the Signing of the Constitution' by Howard Chandler Christy

‘Scene at the Signing of the Constitution’ by Howard Chandler Christy

SMU celebrates good citizenship with food, fun and prizes at the 2013 Constitution Day observance 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 17, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons.

The event is cosponsored by the Office of the ProvostCentral University LibrariesHughes-Trigg Student Center and the Office of Student Affairs.

Food and refreshments will be served; other highlights include a U.S. Constitution trivia game, with prizes awarded for correct answers.

The U.S. Constitution defines the structure of the legislative, judicial and executive branches of the federal government, as well as the duties, limitations of power and interaction of each with the others. The Constitution also defines the rights of individual citizens in the Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the document.

Constitution Day – also known as Citizenship Day – commemorates the ratification of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, and recognizes all who are born in the United States or who have become naturalized citizens. The federal law establishing the observance was created in 2004.

For the latest information, contact Lisa O’Donnell in the Provost’s Office and follow @SMUConstDay on Twitter.

Visit the U.S. Constitution’s official homepage at the National Archives
Find educational resources at the National Constitution Center homepage
Learn more about the observance and its history at ConstitutionDay.com
Read primary documents in American history at the Library of Congress website

Common Reading author Wes Moore visits SMU Aug. 29, 2013

Wes Moore

Author Wes Moore will speak at SMU Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013. Moore wrote the University’s 2013 Common Reading book, The Other Wes Moore.

New York Times best-selling author Wes Moore will visit SMU Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013, to discuss his book, The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates.

The free lecture is part of the University’s 2013 Common Reading Program and will take place 5-6 p.m. in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

> RSVP online for the Wes Moore lecture

Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Early arrival is highly encouraged. In addition, SMU will broadcast the lecture via live streaming.

The Other Wes Moore uses alternating dramatic narratives to tell the story of two kids with the same name, liv­ing in the same city. One grew up to be a Rhodes Scholar, dec­o­rated com­bat veteran, White House Fellow and business leader while the other is serving a life sentence in prison for murder.

SMU Forum: One name, two fates: SMU’s 2013 Common Reading

The story “both disturbs and inspires readers with questions about the influence of family and education in the choices a young person makes,” said SMU Associate Provost Harold Stanley.

The event is sponsored by the Provost’s Office; the Gartner Honors Lecture Series; the Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series; Friends of the SMU Libraries; Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility; Department of English; Embrey Human Rights Program; Residence Life and Student Housing; and the Office of Student Affairs.

> Watch the Wes Moore live stream beginning at 4:50 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29 at smu.edu/live video
Visit the Maguire Center’s Common Reading site

Written by Alyssa Eubank ’14

SMU accepts recommendations of Sexual Misconduct Task Force

SMU President R. Gerald Turner announced May 8 that he has accepted the recommendations of the SMU Task Force on Sexual Misconduct Policies and Procedures for maintaining and improving programs related to sexual misconduct. The recommendations address areas including sexual misconduct reporting procedures, requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the student conduct process, education programs for students, enhanced training for staff and communications to parents.

Turner established the Task Force in September 2012 to re-examine the University’s procedures and policies related to sexual misconduct to determine what changes are needed. Among the 20 members of the Task Force were external experts, including a representative of the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office and the executive director of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Initiative, as well as SMU students, faculty and staff members.

“Sexual misconduct is a serious issue at universities and colleges nationwide, which are required by the federal government to investigate allegations and hold violators accountable through an internal grievance procedure,” Turner said. “Even without such requirements, SMU is committed to policies and procedures that uphold community standards and foster a healthy learning environment based on mutual respect, responsible behavior and fair treatment of all students. I am grateful to the Task Force for its careful deliberations and recommendations. SMU is committed to implementing these changes and monitoring our practices.”

The Task Force made 41 recommendations, some of which address policies and procedures in place at SMU that the group felt should be continued but strengthened. Among these are procedures related to student reporting of sexual misconduct and the process for dealing with sexual misconduct allegations under the Student Code of Conduct. New initiatives recommended include new and more extensive education programs for students, as well as student mentoring and bystander intervention programs. Several Task Force recommendations were implemented during the past year, such as expanding information on SMU’s website. The full report is available online.

“Through our research and meetings, we learned that SMU has in place policies and procedures that align with national benchmarks,” said Task Force chair Kelly Compton, SMU trustee and chair of the Board’s committee on Student Affairs. “We also found areas that should be improved or more effectively addressed with new measures, particularly programs promoting education, training and communication. We are united in our commitment to the well-being of students through effective procedures, helpful resources and the support of a caring community.”

During its deliberations, the Task Force took into account adherence to state and federal laws, in particular Title IX of the Education Amendments and its requirements for handling sexual misconduct allegations. Members also examined other universities’ conduct processes, which – like SMU’s conduct process – are separate and independent of the criminal process.

The Task Force report emphasized that students who experience sexual misconduct should continue to be allowed to choose options that best meet their needs and foster personal healing, as is recommended by sexual misconduct experts. At the same time, SMU should continue to urge students to seek medical care and alert law enforcement about sexual misconduct. The Task Force recommended that SMU enhance efforts to educate students about the right to pursue a Title IX complaint under University policy and their options to pursue criminal charges, the SMU conduct review process, or both processes at the same time. Read more about these options here.

Because these options must be considered during a sensitive time, SMU must clearly communicate and explain processes and ensure that staff members are well-informed in providing guidance. According to the Task Force, education efforts also should focus on students’ understanding of consent, the interpersonal communications related to consent and the impact of alcohol use.

The Task Force recommended that SMU continue its use of hearing boards in student conduct cases, including those related to sexual misconduct cases, a practice similar to that of other universities. It also recommended that SMU continue to have a sexual misconduct hearing board and, also consistent with benchmark practices, reaffirmed that students continue to serve on this board, with these changes: They should not be in the majority nor serve as chair. The majority of this board would consist of faculty and staff, and all members would receive special training and be bound by strict confidentiality requirements.

Regarding student participation on the sexual misconduct hearing board, the Task Force received feedback from students that their understanding of campus social life is critical in aiding conduct deliberations and that SMU has a long history of trusting and valuing student leadership, including appointing a voting student member of the Board of Trustees. Students also described student participation on conduct boards as a way to educate other students about the conduct process. The Task Force agreed with these perspectives.

The Task Force also recommended that student leaders encourage the student body to develop, adopt and disseminate a new SMU Values Statement, such as the following: “I, as a citizen of the SMU Community, commit myself to upholding the values of intellectual integrity, academic honesty, personal responsibility and sincere regard and respect for all SMU students, faculty, and staff.”

The Task Force said SMU should develop a bystander intervention program similar to those at Duke and Yale universities. Those programs provide students the skills to intervene when they perceive peers to be in high-risk situations. In addition, students who may hesitate to report sexual misconduct because of their alcohol or drug use could be granted immunity for those transgressions in order to encourage reporting of sexual misconduct first and foremost, though they also would be referred for counseling to SMU’s Center for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention.

During meetings with the Task Force, several visiting experts shared information and perspectives, including law enforcement and health officials. The Task Force invited feedback from the campus community, including from students involved in sexual misconduct cases through SMU’s conduct process. During their 12 meetings and additional small-group meetings, the Task Force reviewed more than 45 benchmarking reports, including student conduct codes and task force reports from other universities and government agencies.

“The Task Force valued all of the input provided, and especially appreciated hearing from students and members of our North Texas community,” Compton said. “Sexual misconduct is a community issue that requires community partnerships, including with local service and health care providers and law enforcement officials. We recommend that SMU continue building these relationships.”

SMU’s vice president for student affairs, Lori White, will oversee implementation of the Task Force recommendations in coordination with campus offices including Counseling and Psychiatric Services, the Health Center, Dean of Student Life Office, Title IX Coordinator, SMU Police, the Women’s Center for Pride and Gender Initiatives, Chaplain’s Office and Residence Life and Student Housing. As recommended by the Task Force, Student Affairs and other University representatives will maintain regular meetings on sexual misconduct issues with local law enforcement and resource agencies.

“The University thanks the Task Force and the many experts and campus and community members who have provided their perspectives,” Turner said. “SMU regularly reviews its policies and procedures, and no issue is more important than our students’ well-being. We will continue to monitor the effectiveness of all our policies and procedures on sexual misconduct.”

University completes property swap with Chi Omega

SMU Chi Omega House at 3014 Daniel Avenue

The Chi Omega house at 3014 Daniel Avenue will become the property of SMU’s Division of Student Affairs in a swap for University property at 3034 Daniel. The sorority will build its new house at the northeast corner of Daniel and Durham Street. Photo from the SMU Chi Omega website.

SMU has made a property trade with one of its sorority chapters to take effect Monday, April 1, 2013. The Iota Alpha chapter of Chi Omega at SMU will build its new house at 3034 Daniel Avenue, while the current Chi Omega house at 3014 Daniel Avenue will become the property of the Division of Student Affairs.

Chi Omega will begin construction on a new house this year, and its membership wanted to locate the facility closer to the hub of SMU’s sorority activity. In 2012, sorority members began discussions about the exchange with SMU vice presidents Brad Cheves, Development and External Affairs; Chris Regis, Business and Finance, and Lori White, Student Affairs. Cheves helped negotiate the swap.

Later this spring, the sorority will begin abatement and demolition of the SMU Faculty Club building currently located at 3034 Daniel, on the northeast corner of Daniel Avenue and Durham Street. The new Chi Omega house is scheduled to open at its new address in Fall 2014.

The University plans to relocate the Faculty Club to a new visitors’ center, currently in the planning stages. Plans for the facility at 3014 Daniel will be announced at a later date.

The move may have a minimal short-term impact on Faculty Club events such as the Distinguished Luncheons, which are frequently held in larger venues due to high levels of interest. In addition, Faculty Club members will continue to gather in the Faculty/Staff Dining Room in RFoC @ Lee.

In recent years, the Faculty Club has provided office space for Alumni Relations and Engagement and the Faculty Senate. Both offices have moved to the University’s East Campus on North Central Expressway – Alumni Relations to the 6200 Building and the Faculty Senate to the 12th floor of Expressway Tower at 6116 North Central.

The month of March has been devoted to removing and storing all Faculty Club property from the 3034 Daniel house, as well as reusable fixtures ranging from faucets to door handles, says Alison Tweedy, senior director of campus services. “Facility Services will take out anything that can be reused or repurposed,” she says.

The SMU Faculty Club, which is open to both faculty and staff members, was founded in 1921 as a social club for male faculty members. A women’s club was founded in 1928, and the two merged in 1963. Both clubs held their meetings in Atkins Hall (now Clements Hall) until the male club moved to the second floor of McFarlin Auditorium in the 1940s.

As Faculty Senate president in 1972-73, Ruth P. Morgan, who would later become University provost, made it a priority to establish a new home for the Faculty Club. Provost H. Neil McFarland provided the property at 3034 Daniel Avenue, then a sorority house, in 1973. The club was officially chartered in that location on August 6, 1973.

Students get game-day guidelines for The Boulevard

Boulevard at SMU logoSMU’s Office of Student Affairs has approved a set of guidelines for students and student organizations who participate in pre-game activities at The Boulevard.

Students 21 or older who wish to consume alcohol during Boulevard activities must get a game-day Boulevard wristband from an ID table at the event. The wristbands are non-transferable and are required to be served alcohol by any groups or organizations.

In addition, student organizations and groups providing alcohol to their members and guests must have a minimum of two officially licensed bartenders from the SMU Athletics concessionaire. Bartenders will follow all Texas Alcohol Beverage Code rules and may require ID to verify age. Only beer and non-alcoholic beverages may be consumed; liquor is prohibited.

Students visiting from other colleges and universities are expected to abide by all SMU game-day guidelines.

> Read the full list at SMU’s Live Responsibly website
> Find all Boulevard guidelines at smu.edu/boulevard

By | 2010-09-08T14:38:03+00:00 September 8, 2010|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , |

Nominate a student worker for Student Employee of the Year

Do you have a student worker who goes above and beyond the call of duty? Honor him or her with a nomination for 2010 SMU Student Employee of the Year. The deadline is Feb. 15.

All nominees will be rated by panel of SMU judges, and the winner will be announced at a finalists’ luncheon during 2010 National Student Employment Week April 11-17. The University’s Student Employee of the Year will go on to compete for the regional title, and potentially at the national level.

Nominated students must have been employed for a minimum of 3 months full-time or 6 months part-time between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010 (anticipated) – the equivalent of 240 working hours during the year period. All undergraduate student workers are eligible; graduate students who are performing student employee jobs (not resident advisers, graduate assistants or teaching assistants) are eligible.

Submit the nomination form (PDF format) along with a nomination letter to Student Employment Coordinator Meredith Dawson, SMU Box 181, fax number 214-768-3878. For additional information, contact Meredith at 214-768-3490.

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