Tom Barry announces his retirement as SMU vice president for executive affairs

Strategic Plan

Tom Barry announces his retirement as SMU vice president for executive affairs

Thomas E. Barry, SMUThomas E. Barry, who has served as SMU’s vice president for executive affairs since 1995, has announced his retirement from that position effective Dec. 31, 2015. He also has been a member of the marketing faculty in SMU’s Cox School of Business since 1970.

Soon after becoming SMU’s president in 1995, R. Gerald Turner created the vice presidency for executive affairs and appointed Barry to fill it, adding the position to his President’s Executive Council.

“When I came to SMU, I knew that much of my focus would be on preparing SMU and our constituencies for major gift campaigns because we had a critical need for academic resources and campus enhancements,” Turner said. “I wanted a strong administrative leader and experienced academic who knew the University well, who would dig into any project that needed attention, and would bring together teams of colleagues for new initiatives. One of these was to move our strategic planning process forward as the basis for resource development.”

Barry led development of the Master Plan of 1997-2015 to provide direction and cohesion to the physical evolution of the campus, including its expansion east of Central Expressway, as well as improvements to SMU-in-Taos, the University’s New Mexico campus. He worked with SMU architects, facilities staff and oversight committees to help coordinate the addition or renovation of more than 32 campus facilities funded by recent campaigns.

Working with SMU’s other vice presidents and deans, he shepherded development of SMU’s last three strategic plans, including Launching SMU’s Second Century (2016-2025), the new strategic plan to be voted on by SMU’s Board of Trustees at its December 2015 meeting. The strategic plans guided priorities for SMU’s two recent major gift campaigns, The Campaign for SMU: A Time to Lead (1997-2002) and SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign (2008-2015). Together the campaigns raised more than $1.5 billion for scholarships, faculty and academic programs, facilities and the campus experience.

One of the most visible projects benefitting from Barry’s leadership was SMU’s quest to be the home of the George W. Bush Presidential Center. In December 2000, after the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on the election results, President Turner gave Barry his next major assignment: “You are going to become an expert on presidential libraries,” he said. Barry researched the 12 existing presidential libraries under the National Archives and Records Administration to learn how they are funded, structured and operated, including what relationships they have with universities. The information helped guide the content of SMU’s successful proposal. As a marketing expert, he was co-leader of the University’s recent branding research and message development.

“In these years of major gift campaigns, heightened outreach and centennial activities, SMU has been very fortunate to have Tom Barry’s quiet, persistent and substantive leadership,” President Turner said. “He labored primarily behind the scenes, but the results of his talents can be seen throughout campus. As a longtime professor of marketing in Cox School of Business, he brought a faculty perspective to administrative decision-making. Through his teaching and research, he has mentored literally thousands of students. I am personally very grateful for his steadfast service and will miss the integrity and candor of his counsel.”

Barry came to SMU in 1970 as visiting assistant professor of marketing and the next year was appointed to the tenure-track position of assistant professor of marketing. Within three years he was promoted to associate professor of marketing with tenure, and in 1979 rose to full professor. He served for two terms as chair of the Marketing Department and three times as associate dean for academic affairs in the Cox School. He has received numerous teaching awards in the Cox School and served on more than 100 University committees.

Throughout his service as an academic administrator, Barry has remained a prolific researcher, producing three books and more than 80 scholarly articles. He has been one of the most frequent contributors to the three leading advertising journals in the nation.

Barry received his Ph.D. in marketing from North Texas State University (now the University of North Texas) and his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in marketing from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, where he began his teaching career.

In January 2016 Barry will begin a sabbatical year with the option of returning to the Cox faculty.

November 13, 2015|For the Record, News|

Dedman College honors ‘Mr. SMU’ Marsh Terry at 2011 celebration

Marsh Terry at a booksigning for 'The Memorialist'After more than 50 years at SMU, Marshall Terry still regularly visits his office in the Department of English in Dallas Hall. But his influence reaches throughout the University.

Terry – the E.A. Lilly Professor of English, founder of SMU’s Creative Writing Program, and former director of public relations and assistant to SMU President Willis M. Tate – was honored March 23 with the Dedman College Distinguished Graduate Award for his contributions to SMU.

Terry first stepped onto the SMU campus as a student, graduating in 1953 with a bachelor’s degree in English and in 1954 with a master’s degree. He stayed as a member of the faculty, chairing English for two terms and initiating the University’s award-winning creative writing program and the long-running Literary Festival.

A mentor and friend to his students, Terry helped launch the careers of novelists Joe Coomer, Douglas Terry, Tracy Daugherty and Lewis Shiner, among others.

“I took great joy in starting the creative writing program,” he says. “I’ve worked with wonderful students through the years.”

In addition to his academic career, Terry played an important role as an administrator in shaping SMU’s future. As director of public relations and assistant to President Tate, he wrote in 1963 SMU’s first Master Plan – the framework for the University’s current Strategic Plan.

“Looking back, I consider the opportunity to work on the Master Plan as one of the most rewarding parts of my career. That plan is central to everything that has happened at SMU since then,” says Terry, who has been known as “Mr. SMU” to his colleagues for years.

The author of nationally praised short story collections and novels such as Old Liberty, Tom Northway, My Father’s Hands and The Memorialist, Terry has received highest honors from the Texas Institute of Letters and PEN Texas. His histories of SMU, From High on the Hilltop: A Brief History of SMU, and its third edition, Marshall Terry’s History of SMU with Various Essays by His Colleagues, are important resources as SMU celebrates the centennial of its 1911 founding and 2015 opening.

The Dedman Distinguished Graduate Award honors outstanding graduates of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences whose lives demonstrate integrity and outstanding accomplishments.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit the Dedman College website

March 22, 2011|News|

Board of Trustees approves new Residential Commons plan

Students on Main QuadThe SMU Board of Trustees on Sept. 10 approved changes to the campus master plan to include the construction of new residence halls to accommodate a sophomore residency requirement at SMU. First-year students are already required to live on campus.

Five new halls will contain 1,250 beds and will be constructed on the main campus north of Mockingbird Lane near the Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports. The halls will be configured as Residential Commons, including not only housing but also space for classrooms, dining, social and cultural activities, and live-in faculty and staff. Additional parking also would be provided.

Students would continue their relationship with the Commons throughout their SMU years through activities sponsored by the Commons, giving them an ongoing campus connection even if they live off-campus in their final years. The plan is to adapt most existing halls as Residential Commons. Under guidelines to be developed, students living in Greek houses their second year would meet the residency requirement. Each Commons would include a combination of first-year and sophomore students; upper-class students would be accommodated as space allows.

“Providing more students with the opportunity to live on a campus that is architecturally beautiful, student-friendly and filled with academic, cultural and recreational resources supports SMU’s goal to provide our students with the best possible campus experience,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner.

The Residential Commons model “enriches the living and learning environment by emphasizing academic and social balance,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “This intellectual and social community will be appealing to the high-achieving students we seek in greater numbers. The presence of faculty in Residential Commons will create greater opportunities for sharing ideas, informal interactions and mentoring.”

“There is definitely a correlation between multi-year student housing and academic success,” Turner added. Sophomore housing on campuses been linked to higher retention rates and a greater sense of camaraderie among students. The sophomore residency requirement has been recommended by several recent SMU advisory groups, among them the Honors Task Force and the President’s Task Force on Substance Abuse Prevention. Campus planners gathered information from several other universities with multi-year housing, including Rice, Vanderbilt, Washington University and the University of Southern California.

“No private university in the U.S. News & World Report Top 50 lacks the capacity to house all second-year students on campus, and no private university in that group has less than a 90 percent retention rate of first-year students, or less than an 80 percent 6-year graduation rate,” said Ludden. SMU’s first-year retention rate is 88 percent, and its 6-year graduation rate is 77 percent.

The cost of the five new halls will be $134.5 million and will be funded from multiple sources, such as bond proceeds, private donations, and rent revenue. Construction is expected to begin in 2012 and be completed in 2014.

> Read more from SMU News

September 14, 2010|News|

General Education Review committee named

The Office of the Provost has named all members of SMU’s General Education Review Committee. The office plans to establish a website on which faculty and staff members can track the Commitee’s progress and provide feedback.

“The members have all agreed to participate in this important venture on behalf of, and in consultation with, the entire University community,” said Provost Paul Ludden in an e-mail to SMU faculty and staff.

The General Education Review is a key objective of SMU’s Centennial Strategic Plan 2006-2015. The review will examine how the University’s general education requirements “prepare students for citizenship and leadership roles in an educated society.” Copies of the Centennial Strategic Plan 2006-2015 may be picked up in SMU’s libraries.

The committee membership:

Dennis Cordell, Dedman College General Education, Co-Chair
Thomas Tunks, Associate Provost, Co-Chair
Shelley Berg, Dance
Denise DuPont, Foreign Languages and Literatures
Vicki Hill, Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center
Robert Krout, Music Therapy
Monnie McGee, Statistical Science
Mark McPhail, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs
Rachael Morgan, student representative
Ellen Pryor, Associate Provost
Miguel Quiñones, Management and Organizations
Gale Roid, Teaching and Learning
Nina Schwartz, English
Harold Stanley, Political Science
Susan Strobel-Hogan, Residence Life and Student Housing
Brian Stump, Earth Sciences
Alisa Rata Stutzbach, Hamon Arts Library
David Willis, Mechanical Engineering
Jo Geisler, staff support
Michael Tumeo, staff support

October 17, 2008|News|

Research takes center stage at Spring Faculty Meeting

The key to SMU’s future is its investment in research today, said Provost Paul Ludden at the 2008 Spring General Faculty Meeting Jan. 16. “The real business of a university is the creation of new knowledge,” he said. “When our students graduate, what they will remember is the opportunities they had to participate in that creation.” Three outstanding professors were honored with special awards during the meeting.

(more…)

January 18, 2008|News|
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