Stanton Sharp Lecture Series

SMU’s 2017 Stanton Sharp Symposium takes on ‘The Russian Revolution of 1917: A Centennial View’ Feb. 22-23

2017 Stanton Sharp Symposium, 'The Russian Revolution of 1917, A Centennial View'

The global and historical impact of the Russian Revolution of February and October 1917 is the topic for the 2017 Stanton Sharp Symposium on Feb. 22-23, sponsored by SMU’s Clements Department of History.

The two-day event will examine the classic model for the so-called “color revolutions” of the 21st century and the fresh prominence of Russia and Russian history on the world stage. Leading scholars will explore new questions and share their original research on 1917. The schedule:

  • Reception, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22
  • “A Century After 1917: Arguing Over the Russian Revolution” with Laura Engelstein, Yale University, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22
  • “The Duma Committee, the Provisional Government, and the Birth of ‘Triple Power’ in the February Revolution” with Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, University of California-Santa Barbara, 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • “The Kerensky Cult” with Boris Kolonitsky, European University at St. Petersburg and Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • Panel discussion, 4:45-5:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • Reception, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • “Celebrating the Revolution in 2017: A Forecast” with Boris Kolonitsky, 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • Concluding panel discussion, 7:45-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23

All lectures and presentations take place in Crum Auditorium, Collins Executive Education Center, Cox School of Business, and are free and open to the public.

For more information, contact the Clements Department of History, 214-768-2984, or visit smu.edu/history.

 

2015 SMU Stanton Sharp Lecture explores Texas’ hidden Civil War history, Wednesday, Oct. 14

2015 SMU Sharp Lecture, 'A War That Could Not End at Appomattox,' Gregory P. DownsWhen Texans study the history of the Civil War in grade school, they learn it ended when General Lee surrendered to General Grant at Appomattox on April 8, 1865, and that Texas played a relatively small role in the conflict.

Historian Greg Downs argues these lessons are wrong on both counts in his new book, After Appomattox: Military Occupation and the Ends of War. He will challenge the traditional teachings during a lecture, Q&A and book signing at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

“Greg Downs wants to challenge the idea the Civil War reached a neat and tidy end in April of 1865,” says History Chair Andrew Graybill. “What Greg does well is extend the geographical scope to the West. A big focus of his book is Texas, which was one of the last Confederate states to surrender.”

> More on the Stanton Sharp Lectures and Symposium

During Reconstruction, 50,000 Union Army troops were deployed to Texas, which proved the most difficult of the former Confederate states to subdue. At any given time between 1866 and 1870, 40 to 50 percent of the Union troops stationed in the south were garrisoned in Texas.

“People in Texas were still being bought and sold after Appomattox,” Downs says. “Texans still thought slavery would stay. Army officers were imprisoned and murdered in Texas. In some ways, the Civil War was just beginning in Texas as it was ending elsewhere in the South.”

Written by Kenny Ryan

> Visit SMU’s William P. Clements Department of History online: smu.edu/history

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 8, 2014

WWI website imageStanton Sharp Lecture: The second Stanton Sharp Lecture of 2014 will examine Germany’s WWI occupation of the Eastern Front with historian Vejas Liulevicius’ presentation, “Eastern Europe and German Occupation in the First World War.” The lecture will take place at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 8 in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom. For more information visit the SMU Department of History webpage or contact Mildred Pinkston.

2014 Allman Family Public Lecture: The 2014 Allman Family Public Lecture presents “Social Network Interventions” with Nicholas Christakis, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. As a social scientist and physician who conducts research on social factors that affect health, Dr. Christaki will explore how our embeddedness in social networks affects our lives. The lecture will take place at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 9, in McCord Auditorium.

Creation of Christian Nationalism: SMU’s Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute presents John Fea of Messiah College to share his newest research on the 200-year-old history of the American Bible Society and the creation of Christian nationalism. The event will take place at 6 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 9, in Caruth Hall, 147. For more information contact Elizabeth Fielding.

Fall Break: Monday-Tuesday, Oct. 13-14

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 12, 2014

Stanton Sharp Lecture: Mark Hunter, associate professor and associate chair in the Department of Human Geography at the University of Toronto-Scarborough, will give the 2014 Stanton Sharp Lecture Wednesday, Feb. 12. Hunter will speak on the AIDS epidemic in South Africa and how that has transformed gender intimacy over time. Hunter released a book on his research, Love in the Time of AIDS, which received the 2010 C. Wright Mills Award and 2010 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology. The night begins with a reception at 6 and lecture at 6:30, both in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

A heart for veterans: The U.S. Military Veterans of SMU have something sweet for the University community. The student organization will sell Sprinkles cupcakes for their Valentine’s Day fundraiser from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14 at the flagpole. Get there early for the best selection!

SMU's Meadows Symphony OrchestraMSO student concert: Conducting graduate student Daniel Peterson leads the Meadows Symphony Orchestra in concert on Friday, Feb. 14 and Sunday, Feb. 16. The program will feature solos by Sami Eudi (flute) and Scott Leger (horn), winners of the Meadows Undergraduate Concerto Competition. Friday’s concert is at 8 p.m. and Sunday’s at 3 p.m.; both are in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 18, 2013

President's Day graphic

Giving art meaning: Artist David Mackenzie will be at SMU tonight, Monday, Feb. 18, as part of the Visiting Artist Lecture Series. Mackenzie explores art through videos and performances focusing on identity, race and how people represent themselves in public. His work has been described as brief but powerful. Originally from Jamaica, he received a B.F.A. in printmaking from the University of the Arts. The lecture is free and open to the public and starts at 6:30 p.m. in 241 Umphrey Lee Center.

The Naples DocumentsStanton Sharp Lecture: The Clements Department of History invites you to a lecture by Kenneth J. Andrien, SMU’s Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Chair in History. He will speak on the historic Naples documents, whose discovery in 1996 presented a challenge to the historical understanding of the Inca Empire and Spanish conquest. Andrien will explain these controversies and speak on whether he believes the documents are authentic. The lecture takes place Wednesday, Feb. 20, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. A reception will be held at 6 p.m. with the lecture following at 6:30 p.m.

SMU vs. The Great Debaters: SMU will face Wiley College in a public debate Wednesday, Feb. 20. The last time SMU took on the Marshall, Texas-based college was back in 2009. The topic of the debate is to be determined but will focus on a timely controversy that is of interest to the public. The debate starts at 7 p.m. in O’Donnell Hall, 2130 Owen Arts Center.

Arlene Sanchez WalshParar de Sufrir: The Center for the Study of Latino/a Christianity and Religions in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology welcomes Arlene Sánchez Walsh, speaking on “Parar de Sufrir: Health, Wealth, and Suffering in the Latino/a Religious Imagination.” Dr. Sánchez Walsh is an associate professor of church history at Azusa Pacific University and the 2012-13 visiting scholar for the Center. She is an expert in Pentecostal studies, one of the fastest-growing Christian movements, and has published works in this area. The lecture starts at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21 in 121 Prothro Hall. It is free and open to the public and will include refreshments. For more information, contact Josefrayn Sánchez-Perry.

MWE: As part of Black History Month, SMU’s Meadows Wind Ensemble will perform an I Have A Dream concert featuring a reading of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech performed by Meadows alum Donnie Ray Albert and a gospel collaboration with the Hamilton Park Baptist Church Men’s Choir. Albert will also perform two spirituals. The performances begin at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. Buy tickets online or contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Remembering the Civil War on its 150th anniversary

Steven HahnTuesday, April 12, 2011 marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the American Civil War with the first shots fired on Fort Sumter, South Carolina. SMU’s Clements Department of History will observe the date on which the deadliest conflict in the nation’s history began with a Stanton Sharp Lecture by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Steven Hahn.

Hahn will discuss “Why the Civil War Mattered” at 6:30 p.m. in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The event will begin with a reception at 6 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

How might America have looked had there been no Civil War – or if the war had ended differently? Hahn’s lecture will revisit these issues by reminding us of the power of slaveholders and slavery in antebellum America.

“The legacy of the Civil War and its aftermath is still unfolding in this nation. Issues of race remain current and contentious,” says Sherry L. Smith, professor and acting chair of SMU’s Clements Department of History. “Understanding this war – what was at stake and what changed as a result of it – is critical in coming to terms with race in America.”

Hahn is the Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor in American History at the University of Pennsylvania. His latest book, A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South, from Slavery to the Great Migration (Harvard University Press, 2005), won the Pulitzer Prize in History, the Bancroft Prize in American History and the Merle Curti Prize in Social History of the Organization of American Historians.

He also is the author of the prize-winning book The Roots of Southern Populism: Yeoman Farmers and the Transformation of the Georgia Upcountry, 1850-1890 (Oxford University Press, 1983).

Written by Denise Gee

> Read more about SMU Civil War resources from SMU News
> Learn more about SMU’s Stanton Sharp Lecture Series online

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 15, 2009

Illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250, from SMU's Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible CollectionGood books: Nearly 60 remarkable bibles – including Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation and early American editions – are on view in “The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible Collection” in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries, Bridwell Library, through Dec. 11, 2009. For more information call 214-768-3483 or visit the Bridwell Library website. (Right, a page from an illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250.)

Patriotic pride: SMU celebrates Constitution Day 2009 at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 17 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons. The Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution and the traveling Liberty Bell will be present, and cake and punch will be served. For more information, contact Mariana Sullivan, 214-768-4498.

Remembering a pioneer: Author and editor Charlotte Whaley will give a lecture on her latest work – a collection of memoirs by Alice Marriott, one of the first women in the Southwest to hold an advanced degree in anthropology and who studied Southwestern American Indian culture. Reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m., followed by a book signing for Alice Marriott Remembered. All events take place in SMU’s DeGolyer Library. Sponsored by Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and DeGolyer Library. For more information, call 214-768-3225.

“Holocaust Legacies” lecture: Georgetown University Professor of Philosophy Thomas Beauchamp, senior research scholar with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and primary author of the Belmont Report, will participate in a lecture and panel discussion, “From the Nuremburg Code to the Belmont Report and the Final Rule: The Protection of Human Research Subjects in the 21st Century,” Sept. 17 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 6:30 p.m., lecture at 7 p.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program as part of “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point.” Free and open to the public.

'Galileo Goes to Jail' book coverStanton Sharp Lecture: Author, editor and historian Ronald L. Numbers (Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion), Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss “Anti-Evolution in America: From Creation Science to Intelligent Design” Sept. 18 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 3:30 p.m., lecture at 4 p.m. Sponsored by SMU’s Clements Department of History, Dedman College. For more information, contact the history department, 214-768-2967, or visit its Sharp Lectures web page.

Fun and games: Prospective students can explore The Guildhall at SMU during its Fall 2009 open house, 10 a.m.-noon Sept. 19 at the SMU-in-Plano campus, 5232 Tennyson Parkway, Building 2. Activities include food and games for all ages and a bounce house for kids, plus LEGO Star Wars for gaming enthusiasts. RSVP online at the Guildhall website.

Tate-Willson Lecture: Nigel Biggar – Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology and director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life at the University of Oxford – will discuss “Behaving in Public: Christian Ethics in a Polyglot Secularity” at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 22 in 106 Prothro Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Graduate Program in Religious Studies Office, 214-768-2432. Presented by the Graduate Program in Religious Studies and cosponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.