Calatrava celebration continues with Meadows Museum exhibition

Santiago Calatrava

Calatrava celebration continues with Meadows Museum exhibition

Santiago Calatrava and his family received a warm welcome when they visited SMU’s Meadows Museum Saturday, March 3, after taking part in opening ceremonies for Dallas’ Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge.

Calatrava, his wife, Tina, and son, Michael, joined other Meadows Museum guests for a preview of its latest special exhibition, Calatrava and SMU: A Decade in Motion.

“One of the enormous qualities of America is the way it welcomes people,” Calatrava told more than 800 guests at the preview. “You have welcomed us with your will and your heart. I know so many people in this community, but my mother, my alma mater, it’s this university.” Calatrava received a Doctor of Arts honoris causa from SMU in 2005.

The Meadows Museum is home to Wave, the first large-scale Calatrava sculpture to be permanently installed in the United States. The special exhibition includes Calatrava’s preliminary watercolor sketches for the 40-by-90-foot perpetually moving sculpture installed in 2002 on the Museum’s street-level plaza. It also includes correspondence, mementoes and photographs of the sculpture’s installation and dedication. The exhibit runs through April 22, 2012.

“Over the past decade, Calatrava and SMU have built a deep relationship,” says Meadows Museum Director Mark Roglán. “It is now our great pleasure to extend this relationship to the people of Dallas as we join them in celebrating the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge. Our exhibition will offer visitors a unique view of the artist behind the bridge and illustrate the many ties that bind him to SMU.”

Meadows Museum is the only Dallas-Fort Worth museum that includes Calatrava works in its permanent collection. The Meadows collection includes the Calatrava sculptures Palme and Il Dente, which are also part of the exhibition.

The University’s many roles in the weekend of festivities surrounding the bridge opening are captured in a new SMU News video by Eva Parks. Click the YouTube screen to watch, or click here to open the “SMU and Santiago Calatrava” video in a new windowvideo

Written by Nancy George

> Learn more from SMU News’ Calatrava homepage at smu.edu/calatrava
> Visit Meadows Museum online at smu.edu/meadowsmuseum
> More about Santiago Calatrava at calatrava.com

March 8, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News, Tune In|

As Dallas opens new bridge, SMU helps lead Calatrava celebration

SMU’s Meadows Museum, home to the first large-scale Santiago Calatrava sculpture to be permanently installed in the United States, is joining the city-wide celebration honoring the dedication of the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge designed by the Spanish architect.

The Meadows will host a special exhibition, Calatrava and SMU: A Decade in Motion, March 4-April 22, 2012.

The exhibition includes Calatrava’s preliminary watercolor sketches of Wave, the University’s landmark 40-by-90-foot perpetually moving sculpture installed in 2002 on the Museum’s street-level plaza. The exhibition also includes correspondence, mementoes and photographs of the sculpture’s installation and dedication.

“Over the past decade, Calatrava and SMU have built a deep relationship,” says Meadows Museum Director Mark Roglán. “It is now our great pleasure to extend this relationship to the people of Dallas as we join them in celebrating the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge. Our exhibition will offer visitors a unique view of the artist behind the bridge and illustrate the many ties that bind him to SMU.”

On March 3, 2012, Calatrava will return to SMU to see the exhibition and the 2009 renovation of the Meadows Museum Plaza and Sculpture Garden near “Wave.” The plaza’s southwest corner includes a new terrace, the Irwin Overlook, with a view over the sculpture.

Get a complete rundown of the University’s participation in the weekend’s events from SMU News’s Calatrava homepage at smu.edu/calatrava.

Above, Meadows Museum Director Mark Roglán reflects on Calatrava and his work in this video from SMU News. Click the YouTube screen to start, or click here to watch “Santiago Calatrava’s Wave at SMU” in a new window.

> Read the “West Side Stories” essays from SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts
> Learn more about Calatrava and SMU: A Decade in Motion
> Visit Santiago Calatrava’s website at calatrava.com

March 1, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Meadows Museum unveils new plaza Oct. 7

'Sho' by Jaume PlensaThe Meadows Museum reopens its redesigned plaza and sculpture garden – including its iconic Wave installation – with a dedication ceremony beginning at 6 p.m. Oct. 7. The celebration will include the unveiling of a major new acquisition, Sho (left), a monumental sculpture by Catalán artist Jaume Plensa.

The dedication launches a celebration of the Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Collection with the exhibition “Face and Form: Modern and Contemporary Sculpture in the Meadows Collection.” The new plaza will feature a permanent installation of monumental sculpture from the Elizabeth Meadows Collection and the Meadows Museum by artists such as Jacques Lipchitz, Henry Moore, Isamu Noguchi, and Claes Oldenburg.

The plaza’s centerpiece will be Sho, acquired in summer 2009 through gifts from The Eugene McDermott Foundation, Nancy and Jake Hamon, The Meadows Foundation, The Pollock Foundation, the family of Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Pollock and the family of Mr. Lawrence S. Pollock III.

'Wave' by Santiago CalatravaSantiago Calatrava‘s Wave (right), already a fixture of the plaza’s southwest corner, can now be viewed from above from a terrace donated by Richard and Gwen Irwin in honor of his parents, William and Florence Irwin. A staircase, which can be approached from each side, will help integrate the plaza with the rest of the campus, while a new fountain at its foot will greet museum visitors.

The museum will also feature two exhibitions, opening Oct. 8, that illustrate the processes used by Plensa and Calatrava in the creation of Sho and Wave. The displays in the downstairs galleries will include drawings, watercolors, photographs and other materials highlighting both the creative and construction processes involved.

Read more about “Face and Form: Modern and Contemporary Sculpture in the Meadows Collection”
Visit the Meadows Museum online

October 6, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|
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