‘Year of the Faculty’ website goes live

Santanu Roy

‘Year of the Faculty’ website goes live

SMU's Year of the Faculty websiteSMU’s 2014 Year of the Faculty celebration kicks into gear with the launch of a new website honoring faculty achievement and recognition.

The site’s central feature is an archive of memories from SMU alumni and students. More than 300 remembrances of favorite faculty members have already been sent in, and the University is spreading the word through news and social media.

Throughout the year, the website will also highlight the achievements of individual faculty members from many different disciplines. Faculty profiles will include endowed chairs and noted experts, as well as award-winning teachers, scholars and researchers.

In addition, the Year of the Faculty theme will be part of several public celebrations throughout the calendar year, beginning with 2014 Founders’ Day Weekend April 10-13 – which launches with a historic Centennial Salute to the faculty at the annual President’s Briefing.

The Year of the Faculty is part of the University’s ongoing centennial celebration and will be a central theme of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign. The celebration was first announced by SMU Provost Paul Ludden during the 2014 Spring General Faculty Meeting Wednesday, Jan. 22.

> Visit SMU’s Year of the Faculty homepage

February 21, 2014|News, Site Spotlight, Year of the Faculty|

2013 Fall General Faculty Meeting takes place Aug. 28

Originally posted Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013.

SMU President R. Gerald Turner will address the University faculty at the Fall General Faculty Meeting Wednesday, Aug. 28 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. The meeting will begin at 3:45 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Theater, following a reception beginning at 3 p.m. in the Theater foyer.

Newly tenured faculty will receive their regalia during the meeting. In addition, Faculty Senate President Santanu Roy will give the Senate’s report, and Provost Paul Ludden will announce the winner of the 2012-13 Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award from the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of The United Methodist Church.

August 27, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News, Save the Date|

SMU panel to explore the history (and future) of privacy Oct. 31, 2012

A panel of SMU faculty members from a wide range of disciplines will examine the history of and emerging ramifications for the concept of privacy in the 21st century at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center West Ballroom.

The program launches the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute’s IMPACT (Interdisciplinary Meetings to Address Pressing Current Themes) series of symposia. Sponsored by the Embrey Family Foundation, the symposium is free and open to the public and includes a 3 p.m. reception.

Lee Cullum, journalist and fellow in SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies, will moderate the discussion. Panelists include SMU professors whose studies touch on some aspect of privacy:

  • George Holden is professor of psychology in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Holden specializes in developmental psychology with a focus on family violence and parent-child interactions. His current research involves analyzing home audio recordings of mothers and their preschoolers. “Psychologists are in the business of exploring people’s private lives — such as their secret thoughts and behavior behind closed doors,” Holden says. “Consequently, we are confronted with various thorny issues.”
  • Alexis McCrossen is associate professor of history in Dedman College whose specialty is U.S. social and cultural history. “Privacy is an institution that came of age in early modern Europe,” she says.
  • Beth Newman is associate professor of English and director of the Women and Gender Studies Program in Dedman College. Newman, whose specialty is 19th-century British literature, says “The concept of privacy developed alongside the rise of the novel, which reinforced its importance — especially for the middle class.”
  • Santanu Roy is professor of economics in Dedman College. Roy’s research interests are in industrial organization, natural resources and environment, international and economic growth.
  • Mary Spector is associate professor of law and director of the Consumer Law Project – both in Dedman School of Law. Spector’s research interests are in the areas of consumer credit, landlord-tenant law and clinical legal education.
  • Suku Nair is chair and professor of computer science and engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering. Nair’s research interests are in network and systems security and reliability.

The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute was made possible by a $5 million gift from the Dedman Family and the Dedman Foundation. The Institute was created to bring together faculty and students from the humanities, sciences and social sciences for collaborative research and other programs. The Institute will host annual seminars bringing together faculty, graduate and undergraduate students and members of the community to discuss global issues.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story at SMU News

October 30, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Research: Do trade restrictions actually increase exporting?

Stock photo of a young woman shopping for electronic devicesImposing trade restrictions on parallel imports has the surprising effect of motivating a firm to export, according to a new study by economists Santanu Roy of SMU’s Dedman College and Kamal Saggi of Vanderbilt University.

Using game theory analysis, the economists found that diverse parallel importing policies among countries today make it possible to analyze for the first time how competition between firms and allowing or banning parallel imports can influence competition in foreign and domestic markets.

“Our research is the first to look at the consequence of strategic policy setting by governments in the context of competition in domestic and foreign markets,” said Roy, professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Economics.

Most surprising among the findings, he said, is that imposing trade restrictions on parallel imports can actually motivate a firm to export – which can be the case when the market to which the firm is exporting is smaller than its own.

“So even though you are formally prohibiting the import of a product, you are actually promoting trade,” Roy said. “And that’s a new way of looking at this.”

Parallel importing occurs when a manufacturer exports its trademarked or patented products to a foreign market where demand, policies or price pressures require the goods be sold at a lower price. A third-party buyer purchases the low-priced goods and imports them back to the manufacturer’s home country, undercutting domestic prices.

The controversial practice has spawned gray market retail, where consumers buy high-value, brand-named goods at cut prices, such as electronics, video games, alcohol, books and pharmaceuticals.

Some advocates of free trade decry parallel importing, saying it infringes on manufacturers’ intellectual property rights accorded by copyright, patent and trademark laws. That, in turn, can discourage investment in new technology and products.

As a result, some countries allow parallel importing; others ban it. For example, parallel importing is allowed among the member countries of the European Union. It’s not permitted by the United States, although exceptions exist for many different products. Generally speaking, developed nations restrict parallel importing, while developing nations allow it.

The study by Roy and Saggi found there is no one-size-fits-all solution – neither a global ban nor a blanket endorsement. In fact, the authors found that policy diversity is working well because it takes into account important variables such as similarity or dissimilarity of markets, as well as competing products and government regulations.

“The only area where there may be need for intervention is where there may be major asymmetries between countries – where one country is very large and the other is very small,” Roy said.

Roy and Saggi report their findings in two articles: “Equilibrium Parallel Import Policies and International Market Structure,” a scenario in which there are quality differences in the products across countries, forthcoming in the Journal of International Economics; and “Strategic Competition and Optimal Parallel Import Policy,” a scenario in which there is asymmetrical protection of intellectual property, forthcoming in the Canadian Journal of Economics. The two economists were members of a development research group at the World Bank that researched parallel importing.

Written by Margaret Allen

> Read the full story from the SMU Research blog

May 8, 2012|Research|

For the Record: Feb. 5, 2010

Robin Lovin, Cary Maguire University Professor of Ethics, was co-speaker (with Victor Anderson of the Vanderbilt Divinity School) in the Douglas Sturm Dialogue, “Justice, Reparation, and Forgiveness: Finding a Moral Vocabulary for America’s Racial Future,” which took place Feb. 4, 2010 at Bucknell University. The Sturm Dialogue, which features two distinguished thinkers in ethics and social justice, is sponsored by Bucknell’s departments of religion and political science and Social Justice College, and held in honor of Bucknell emeritus professor of religion Douglas Sturm.

Alice Kendrick, Temerlin Advertising Institute, Meadows School of the Arts, has been elected to the National Advertising Review Board. The NARB is a 70-member appeals board that is part of the National Advertising Review Council, which was established in 1971 to provide guidance and set standards of truth and accuracy for national advertisers. Kendrick is one of 10 members of the public and academia on the NARB.

Jason McKenna, Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College, has received the U.S. Department of Defense’s highest award for civilian career employees. As a senior research geophysicist at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center, he became one of 6 recipients of the Department of Defense’s Distinguished Civilian Service Award in December. He received the honor for his “contributions to the safety and welfare of defense personnel worldwide” through his work in research and development of products for detecting and defeating clandestine tunneling to ensure security at U.S. borders. Read more from The Vicksburg Post.

Santanu Roy, Economics, Dedman College, received a 2009 Annual Award for Outstanding Contribution to Education from the Greater Dallas Indo-American Chamber of Commerce. The award was presented by Meera Shankar, ambassador of the Republic of India to the United States, during a banquet Dec. 10 at The Westin Galleria in Dallas.

February 5, 2010|For the Record|
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