Art History Chair Roberto Tejada wins Fulbright Distinguished Chair

Roberto Tejada

Art History Chair Roberto Tejada wins Fulbright Distinguished Chair

Roberto Tejada, Distinguished Endowed Chair in Art History in SMU's Meadows School of the ArtsRoberto Tejada, Distinguished Endowed Chair in Art History in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, has been named the 2012-13 recipient of the Fulbright-FAAP Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts.

The award from the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program will allow Tejada to engage in scholarship with faculty and students at the Armando Alvares Penteado Foundation (FAAP) in São Paulo, Brazil.

One of four distinguished chairs in different disciplines established in Brazil by the Fulbright Scholar Program, the FAAP Distinguished Chair was created to call attention to U.S. scholars’ contributions to the development of the visual arts in Brazilian universities and in the arts community. FAAP is a prestigious arts school and cultural center in São Paulo, housing both a theater and the Museum of Brazilian Art.

Tejada, an internationally known specialist in modern and contemporary Latin American and Latino/U.S. visual culture, will spend four months at FAAP in Fall 2012 interacting with graduate and undergraduate students.

“My research in visual studies has encompassed a series of questions in the overlapping domains of art history, inter-American studies and critical theory,” he said. “I’ve had the opportunity to write about contemporary Brazilian artists for exhibition catalogs and other publications in Mexico and the United States, and I’ve more recently been devoting research to the greater art world of São Paulo. By contrasting contemporary art from Brazil and the United States, I look to locality as being critical to the production of art — as important as any meaning is to its representational effects.

“My goal as the Fulbright-FAAP Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts is to establish the groundwork for productive exchanges between the Fundação Armando Alvares Penteado, SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, collecting institutions in the Dallas area, and other U.S. and international stakeholders in Brazil’s contemporary arts,” he said.

> Read the full story from SMU News

April 19, 2012|For the Record, News|

For the Record: May 19, 2011

Ron WetheringtonRon Wetherington (top right), Anthropology, Dedman College, has been appointed to the State Textbook Review Panel for Supplemental Science. Wetherington, who also serves as director of the University’s Center for Teaching Excellence, will serve on the review panel for Supplemental Science Biology, which will meet in Austin during the week of June 13-17, 2011.

The review panel will help determine instructional materials to be used by school districts and open-enrollment charter schools for the next several years. Panel members’ responsibilities include reviewing and evaluating instructional materials submitted for the adoption by the State Board of Education; determining the extent to which instructional materials cover the required Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS); and identifying factual errors in the materials.

Anthony Cortese, Sociology, Dedman College, participated in the Pacific Sociological Association meetings in Seattle, Washington. He critiqued Behind the Backlash: Muslims After 9/11 by Lori Peek in an “Author Meets the Critics” session and organized and moderated two sessions on immigration: “Immigrants and Immigration Policy” and “Latino Immigrants: Human Rights and Economic Issues.” He also presented a paper, “The Blurring of Goffman’s Concepts of Private and Public Pictures on Social Networks,” at the Southern Sociological Society meetings in Jacksonville, Florida.

Jodi Cooley, Physics, Dedman College, has received a 2011 Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award, sponsored by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). The award provides $10,000 to support her research. Cooley is one of 30 awardees selected nationally this year.

Chef Elias Acosta, SMU Dining Services, by Michael Danser, The Daily CampusElias Acosta (middle right), SMU Dining Services, earned a Gold Medal in the Southwest Regional ARAMARK Culinary Excellence (ACE) Challenge 2011. He won the award for his menu of Pan-Seared Pistachio Crusted Sea Bass with glazed baby carrots and risotto, and a dessert of Handmade Crêpes with Grand Marnier Goat Cheese garnished with figs and fresh mandarin segments. Acosta will be one of three chefs to represent the Southwest Region in the ACE National Competition in July. (Photo by Michael Danser, The Daily Campus.)

Amy Buono, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, has received post-doctoral fellowships from both the Getty Research Institute and the American Association of University Women. She will be in residence during 2011-12 at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, completing work on her book manuscript Feather Techné: Tupinambá Interculture in Early Modern Brazil and Europe.

Buono also is completing work on an edited translation of the 1766 illustrated Jesuit medicinal Collecção de varias receitas de segredos particulares des principaes boticas da nossa companhia de Portugal, da India, de Macao e do Brasil, with E. J. Brill Publishers. In Summer 2010 Buono received a residential New World Comparative Studies Summer Fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University.

Emily George Grubbs, Central University Libraries, will present a gallery talk, “Adventures in the Archives: Discovering the Gigaku Masks,” at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) May 25, 2011. Grubbs, curatorial assistant for the Hamon Arts Library’s Bywaters Special Collections, will discuss her discovery of two rare Japanese masks dating from the 8th to 10th centuries among the artifacts in the Library’s McCord/Renshaw Collection. Her co-presenter is Anne Bromberg, the DMA’s Cecil and Ida Green Curator of Ancient and Asian Art.

Ramsey Kweik and Maria Richards, SMU Geothermal LaboratoryRoberto Tejada, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, will serve as a juror for the National Book Award in 2011-12.

Ramsey Kweik, a geological sciences major and 2011 graduating senior in Dedman College, was named SMU’s 2011 Student Employee of the Year in April. Kweik worked as an assistant in the SMU Geothermal Laboratory for nearly four years. His responsibilities include assisting with research projects from federal and state agencies and private companies, giving presentations as part of the geothermal outreach program, and assisting with coordination of the international Geothermal Energy Utilization Associated with Oil and Gas Development conference hosted by SMU.

In her nomination letter, Geothermal Laboratory Program Coordinator Maria Richards wrote, “I have seen Ramsey demonstrate reliability, quality of work, initiative, a positive attitude and professionalism in all that he contributes to the SMU Geothermal Laboratory. Although he is a student employee, he has become a friend and colleague over the past four years.” (Bottom right, Ramsey Kweik and Maria Richards.)

May 19, 2011|For the Record|

Art History adds Ph.D program, names Tejada as endowed chair

Roberto TejadaFollowing an international search, the Division of Art History in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has announced the appointment of Roberto Tejada (right) as the new Distinguished Endowed Chair in Art History, effective Aug. 1, 2010.

The new endowed position was made possible by an anonymous gift of $2 million, intended to help launch a new Ph.D. program in art history at SMU in the fall of 2011. It will be the first art history Ph.D. program in North Texas and one of only a few in the state.

“Although our donor wishes to remain anonymous, we express our gratitude for this generous support of a major goal of the Second Century Campaign – strengthening our academic programs and increasing the number of endowed academic positions,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The appointment of Dr. Tejada and this innovative new doctoral program in art history leverage the unique resources of the Meadows Museum and the cultural richness of our region.”

A well-known specialist in modern and contemporary Latin American and Latino/U.S. visual culture, Dr. Tejada is also a highly distinguished teacher, art critic, poet, curator and editor. Ramón A. Gutierrez, Preston & Sterling Morton Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Chicago, said that Tejada is regarded as “one of a very small handful of top Latino art historians/critics and as one of Latin America’s most important thinkers in the field.”

“We are thrilled to have Professor Tejada as our new endowed chair,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “He has formidable scholarly, curatorial and editorial credentials that will transform SMU’s already excellent art history program into one of national and international prominence, particularly in the arena of Latin American and Iberian studies. Building on the excellence of our existing faculty’s expertise in Colonial Latin America, Pre-Columbian art, and medieval Spain, and also on the strengths of the Meadows Museum and its renowned collection of Spanish art, Dr. Tejada will be a magnet for Ph.D. students around the world.”

Tejada comes to SMU from the University of Texas-Austin, where he is an associate professor in the art and art history department. Previously he taught at the University of California-San Diego, where he was one of 8 prominent scholars specifically hired by the university to promote interdisciplinary research and create synergies among departments, programs and research centers.

Professor Tejada also has lived in Mexico City, taught at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and curated for the Museo de las Artes in Guadalajara. He spent 7 years as executive editor of Artes de México, one of the continent’s leading arts journals, and was on the editorial team of Vuelta Magazine in Mexico City, published by the late Nobel Laureate Octavio Paz, which focused on the arts, culture and politics of Latin America. He has published books on Mexican photography and on the artist Celia Alvarez Muñoz as well as numerous articles.

An accomplished poet, Tejada founded and is now co-editor of Mandorla: New Writing from the Americas, one of the premiere bilingual journals of poetry, poetics, and visual arts from the Americas. He will continue to publish the journal at SMU.

The recipient of numerous grants and fellowships, Tejada earned his Ph.D. in interdisciplinary studies (art history, English, comparative literature and media studies) at the State University of New York-Buffalo and his B.A. in comparative literature at New York University.

The international search for the new chair was led by SMU University Distinguished Professor in Art History Greg Warden. The search committee included numerous prominent scholars, among them W.J.T. Mitchell of the University of Chicago and Annabel J. Wharton of Duke University.

The division’s new Ph.D. program will feature a curriculum with two areas of concentration: one geographic, covering Latin America, Iberia and the Americas; and the other media-based, focusing on technologies of visual communication.

The Ph.D. curriculum is called RASC/A (Rhetorics of Art, Space and Culture,) says Janis Bergman-Carton, chair of art history at SMU. “Rooted in the fields of both art history and visual culture studies, RASC/A builds upon the strengths of the present faculty with renewed emphasis on historical and new media, architecture and the city, and performance and ritual,” she adds. “Emphasizing spatial as well as visual culture, RASC/A extends the department’s commitment to the study of visual technologies, while also advancing transnational scholarship in arts of Latin America, Iberia, and the Americas.

“Dr. Tejada’s extensive work on photography and modern Mexican, Chicano, and Contemporary Latino art history makes him the ideal candidate for this exciting initiative.”

> Read more from SMU News

June 29, 2010|News|
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