Residence Life and Student Housing

Maguire Center, Residence Life honor military vets with ‘Red, White and Blues’ Nov. 11, 2015

SMU Veterans Day 2015 graphicSMU honors military vets everywhere – especially those who are part of the University community – with music, food and festivities on Veterans Day 2015, Wednesday, Nov. 11.

The Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Residence Life and Student Housing have joined forces to present a “Red, White and Blues” barbecue luncheon, featuring musical entertainment by Dallas blues band Miss Marcy and Her Texas SugarDaddys. The party takes place 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Mack Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

All SMU faculty, staff and student military veterans will receive an SMU Veteran lapel pin to recognize their service. Also scheduled are a free raffle, Veterans Day trivia, and a U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys For Tots drop-off table.

> Find more information at the Maguire Center website: smu.edu/ethics

Students honor professors’ excellence with 2015 HOPE Awards

SMU’s Department of Residence Life and Student Housing honored 45 exceptional University educators at the 2015 HOPE Awards Banquet in February.

HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Award recipients are named through student staff member nominations as professors who “have made a significant impact to our academic education both inside and outside of the classroom.”

Eric Larson, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering, was honored as 2015 Professor of the Year.

The complete list of 2015 HOPE Award honorees:

Cox School of Business

  • Judy Foxman, Marketing
  • Hyungshin Park, Accounting
  • Robert Puelz, Real Estate, Insurance and Business Law

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

  • Adriana Aceves, Mathematics
  • Paul Avey, Tower Center for Political Studies
  • Greg Brownderville, English
  • David Michael Crow, Psychology
  • LeeAnn Derdeyn, English/Discernment and Discourse
  • Melissa Dowling, History/Classical Studies
  • John Duca, Economics
  • James K. Hopkins, History
  • Vanessa Hopper, English
  • Matthew Keller, Sociology
  • Michael Lattman, Chemistry
  • David Lee, Anthropology
  • Judy Newell, Mathematics
  • Rachel Ney, World Languages and Literatures/French
  • Jennifer O’Brien, Chemistry
  • Wei Qu, World Languages and Literatures/Chinese
  • Stephen Robertson, Statistical Science
  • Bivin Sadler, Statistical Science
  • Martha Satz, English
  • Sam Ross Sloan, English
  • Tom Stone, English
  • Thierry Tirado, World Languages and Literatures/French
  • Nick Tsarevsky, Chemistry
  • John Wise, Biological Sciences
  • Patty Wisian-Neilson, Chemistry
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Lyle School of Engineering

  • Mark Fontenot, Computer Science and Engineering
  • Eric Larson, Computer Science and Engineering
  • Peter Raad, Mechanical Engineering

Meadows School of the Arts

  • Hank Hammett, Music/Meadows Opera Theatre
  • Debora Hunter, Art
  • Mark Kerins, Film and Media Arts
  • Suzanne Larkin, Advertising
  • Melissa Murray, Music
  • Tom Tunks, Music
  • Ben Voth, Communication Studies

Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

  • Yolette Garcia, Assistant Dean for External Affairs and Outreach
  • Lynn Jacobs, Applied Physiology and Wellness
  • Kelyn Rola, Applied Physiology and Wellness

Dedman School of Law

  • Martin Camp, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs
  • Meghan Ryan, Criminal Law and Procedure, Torts

Perkins School of Theology

  • Abraham Smith, New Testament

SMU dedicates new Residential Commons complex

On Friday, May 9, 2014, SMU dedicated its new Residential Commons complex, enabling all first-year and sophomore students to live on campus and launching the Residential Commons (RC) model campus-wide. The RC model will be implemented campuswide during the Fall 2014 term.

The $146 million complex is the largest capital project in SMU’s history and part of a larger initiative to enhance students’ living and learning experience. New facilities for the nine-acre Commons complex include five residence halls – Armstrong CommonsKathy Crow CommonsCrum CommonsLoyd Commons and Ware Commons – as well as the Anita and Truman Arnold Dining Commons and the 800-space Mustang Parking Center. The complex will provide campus housing for an additional 1,250 SMU students, enabling nearly 2,750 students to live on campus.

The dedication of the Residential Commons complex “signifies an exciting new chapter in SMU history,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Each Commons is designed to seamlessly combine the intellectual and social aspects of University life, a concept that will be implemented campuswide in the fall. We are grateful to six generous families for transforming the SMU campus experience.”

Residential Commons facts and video video

Lead gifts of $30 million in total giving have been provided by Liz Martin Armstrong ’82 and Bill Armstrong ’82, Anita Ray Arnold and Truman Arnold, Katherine Raymond Crow ’94 and Harlan R. Crow, Sylvie P. Crum and Gary T. Crum ’69, Penny R. Loyd and Paul B. Loyd Jr. ’68, and Richard Ware ’68 and family.

Each five-story Commons in the new complex will be home to 250 students, a residence life director and a faculty member in residence.  The faculty member will serve as mentor and intellectual leader of the community, and has the opportunity to teach a class or host study sessions in the classroom included in each Commons.

Read more from SMU News

 

$5 million gift from Harlan and Kathy Crow to support SMU Residential Commons

Harlan and Katherine Raymond Crow of Dallas have committed $5 million toward the construction of the Kathy Crow Commons in SMU’s new Residential Commons complex, scheduled to open in fall 2014. Mrs. Crow is a member of the SMU Board of Trustees and an alumna.

“This gift from Harlan and Kathy Crow will support a campus home and gathering place for generations of students,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Students who live in Kathy Crow Commons will be part of an academic and residential community that will become a key part of their SMU experience. We are grateful for the Crows for this generous gift.”

SMU’s new Residential Commons model of campus living, which includes 11 Commons created from new and existing residential buildings, will provide an integrated academic and residential student experience. Live-in faculty members will have offices and teach classes in on-site classrooms. In addition, each Commons will develop traditions and host gatherings and activities to create a sense of community among the residents.

“We have studied numerous institutions with strong residential communities,” said Lori White, vice president for student affairs. “We know the Residential Commons model will strengthen the SMU experience by enhancing student involvement opportunities and creating common bonds and friendships among diverse groups of students.”

Since 1988, Harlan Crow has served as chairman and CEO of Crow Family Holdings, which manages the capital of the Trammell Crow family. The Trammell Crow Company, founded in Dallas in 1948 by Crow’s father, is one of the nation’s oldest and largest commercial real estate developers and investors. Mr. Crow has worked with Crow-affiliated entities for nearly 40 years. He serves on the board of directors of the American Enterprise Institute, the Southwestern Medical Foundation, the Supreme Court Historical Society, the George W. Bush Presidential Library Foundation and the Antiquarian Society. In addition Mr. Crow is the honorary consul of Denmark for the Southwestern region.

Dallas civic leader Kathy Crow earned her M.B.A. from Cox School of Business. In addition to her current position on the SMU Board of Trustees, she has served on the boards of SMU’s Tate Lecture Series and the Women’s Economics and Financial Series at Cox School of Business.

The $5 million gift for the Kathy Crow Commons counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date has raised $844 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience. The campaign coincides with SMU’s celebration of the 100th anniversary of the University’s founding in 1911 and its opening in 1915.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

$5 million gift will help build new Residential Commons dining center

Anita and Truman Arnold have given $5 million toward construction of the Anita and Truman Arnold Dining Commons in SMU’s new Residential Commons complex.

Now under construction, this facility joins five residence halls and a parking garage, all of which will accommodate 1,250 students and several faculty as members of a shared campus community.

“We are deeply grateful to the Arnolds for their generous support,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “This dining facility will be the centerpiece of our new Residential Commons complex and will be an important element of the campus experience for countless present and future students.”

The Arnolds’ gift counts toward the $750 million goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date has raised more than $732 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Chronicle of Higher Education: Colleges Design New Housing to Engage and Retain Students

The new Residential Commons complex is expected to open in Fall 2014 in the southeast quadrant of the campus adjacent to Ford Stadium and Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports. The addition of these residential facilities will enable SMU to implement a new requirement that sophomores, as well as first-year students, live on campus.

The complex of new facilities is part of a larger SMU initiative to establish a residential commons living-learning model that will include renovation of six current residence halls that are being retrofitted to become residential commons. On-campus living beyond the first year has been linked to higher student retention rates at universities offering this benefit.

“By including facilities for live-in faculty members, who also will have offices and teach classes in the Residential Commons, this complex will provide students with an integrated academic and living experience,” said Paul Ludden, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs.

Find answers to Frequently Asked Questions about SMU’s Residential Commons

“This model supports a strong residential community with a balance between academic and social aspects of campus life,” said Lori S. White, vice president for student affairs. “Each commons will develop activities and traditions that build a sense of community and encourage lasting ties among the student residents.”

All students and faculty living in the five residential units of the complex will share meals in the Anita and Truman Arnold Dining Commons, which also will be open to other students. The 29,658-square-foot dining commons will have a seating capacity of 500.

> Read more from SMU News

Common Reading author Wes Moore visits SMU Aug. 29, 2013

Wes Moore

Author Wes Moore will speak at SMU Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013. Moore wrote the University’s 2013 Common Reading book, The Other Wes Moore.

New York Times best-selling author Wes Moore will visit SMU Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013, to discuss his book, The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates.

The free lecture is part of the University’s 2013 Common Reading Program and will take place 5-6 p.m. in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

> RSVP online for the Wes Moore lecture

Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Early arrival is highly encouraged. In addition, SMU will broadcast the lecture via live streaming.

The Other Wes Moore uses alternating dramatic narratives to tell the story of two kids with the same name, liv­ing in the same city. One grew up to be a Rhodes Scholar, dec­o­rated com­bat veteran, White House Fellow and business leader while the other is serving a life sentence in prison for murder.

SMU Forum: One name, two fates: SMU’s 2013 Common Reading

The story “both disturbs and inspires readers with questions about the influence of family and education in the choices a young person makes,” said SMU Associate Provost Harold Stanley.

The event is sponsored by the Provost’s Office; the Gartner Honors Lecture Series; the Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series; Friends of the SMU Libraries; Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility; Department of English; Embrey Human Rights Program; Residence Life and Student Housing; and the Office of Student Affairs.

> Watch the Wes Moore live stream beginning at 4:50 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29 at smu.edu/live video
Visit the Maguire Center’s Common Reading site

Written by Alyssa Eubank ’14

Three SMU professors named first Faculty in Residence

SMU professors  Mark FontenotRobert Krout and Tom Tunks have been chosen to be the first Faculty in Residence (FiRs) for SMU’s Residential Commons experience.

All three of the first Faculty in Residence – informally dubbed “the Founding FiRs” by Residence Life and Student Housing staff members – have had formative roles in the early stages of the program, says Jeff Grim, assistant director of residence life.

Thomas Tunks

Thomas Tunks

Fontenot has spent three non-continuous years since 2009-10 living in a student residence hall as part of SMU’s Engineering Learning Community. Much of Tunks’ service as associate provost from 1998-2006 and from 2007-2011 focused on how to integrate students’ academic and social lives more closely, from which the Residential Commons program took root. (He returned to full-time teaching as a professor of music in Meadows School of the Arts in 2012.) Krout helped design the Faculty in Residence position and has served on several subcommittees for the new program; he will move into the renovated Mary Hay Hall this summer.

“It is an incredibly exciting time to be at SMU as the new Residential Commons begin to take shape both physically and philosophically,” says Krout, professor of music therapy in Meadows School of the Arts. “SMU is a very special place for students, staff and faculty, and I feel that the University’s vision, mission, and goals will all come together in a unique and synergistic way through this initiative.”

The Washington Post: Colleges’ newest dorm dwellers: Professors and their families

Robert Krout

Robert Krout

Each commons will represent in a microcosm the diversity of the entire SMU community, Krout says. “It will be a positive challenge for each FiR to work with students and staff in their Residential Commons to embrace diversity of all kinds. These will be truly integrated academic and residential communities – environments that can become dynamic forces in student academic achievement, personal development, engagement and social life.”

Fontenot, Krout and Tunks will focus on identifying opportunities for students and faculty to interact outside the classroom. The FiRs’ goal will be to “emphasize a culture of mentorship, intellectual discourse, and community that is cultivated in all aspects of the collegiate experience inside and outside of the classroom,” according to the Residential Commons website.

> Learn more about the Faculty in Residence selection process and timeline

“Supporting students through the formative college years is very important to me,” says Fontenot, senior lecturer in the Computer Science and Engineering Department, Lyle School of Engineering. “The barriers that exist between faculty and students are too high, and any activity that can break them down gets my attention. In my opinion, being a Faculty in Residence is one of the most important and significant ways to break down these walls.”

During his years as a self-described “guinea pig” for the Faculty in Residence concept, Fontenot has had the opportunity “to more fully understand the life of an SMU undergraduate, the multitude of directions in which they are pulled, and the amazing amount of drive, passion and dedication they bring to this campus,” he says.

Mark Fontenot

Mark Fontenot

“Good teaching is as much about knowing who you are teaching as it is about what you are teaching,” Fontenot adds. “An awareness of life outside the classroom has made me a better teacher inside the classroom. My hope is that by continuing to participate as a Faculty in Residence, I can help more students recognize the benefit of reaching out to their professors on a regular basis.”

A committee of faculty, staff and students met for more than a year to benchmark residential college programs at institutions such as Washington University in St. Louis, Vanderbilt, the University of Pennsylvania, Rice, Baylor and the University of Chicago, Grim says. The Faculty in Residence position description was one result of that work.

Each of the 11 Residential Commons will have one Faculty in Residence. As the program expands, other faculty members will serve as Faculty Affiliates. In these positions, professors will have opportunities to dine with students and be part of Residential Commons life while living off campus.

> Read position descriptions for Faculty in Residence and Faculty Affiliates

The new residential quad currently under construction in the southeast campus provides important support for the program, but the Residential Commons concept “is actually a transformation of our entire residence life experience,” Grim says. During the summers of 2013 and 2014, the University will renovate existing halls to create faculty apartments and expanded RLSH staff apartments. In addition, “every hall will have classroom space either in or around it,” Grim says. The Residential Commons program will be ready to launch in August 2014.

“Students can go to many other schools where they can interact with faculty informally and integrate their academic and social lives together,” Grim says. By providing such an experience, SMU “will be able to recruit and retain students who are interested in developing a life of the mind in their residence halls.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: Colleges Design New Housing to Engage and Retain Students

The program will also help the University “create a kind of blended idea of what it means to learn in college, inside and outside the classroom, and integrate these two ideas into a more seamless learning environment,” Grim says. “I think the Residential Commons as a whole will help establish more of a connection to the campus early in our students’ time with us, and the faculty will help create that.”

There are benefits for the participating faculty as well, Grim notes. “They’ll get to mentor and connect with students both within and outside their discipline. Some of the faculty we work with don’t get to interact with a broad range of undergraduates because they teach only upper-level courses. Through the Residential Commons, they’ll get to work with students who have many different experiences, interests and backgrounds.”

Each hall’s live-in residential community director (RCD) will continue to hold responsibilities such as selecting staff, supervising emergency response and creating programming. As part of the Residential Commons, “they’ll also be working hand in hand with a faculty member to create an academically focused social community,” Grim says. “The RCDs and the faculty will be partners in creating a seamless learning environment.” Upper-class student resident assistants will also work closely with faculty in this effort, he adds.

> Nominate a faculty member to become a Faculty in Residence

Grim expects the eight remaining FiRs to be named by the end of the Spring 2013 term. Faculty members have applied from six of SMU’s seven schools, he adds.

“Most of the FiRs will not be in place until Fall 2014, but we’ll spend this next year developing programs and building relationships so that come 2014, it’s a seamless and easy transition,” Grim says. The Faculty Affiliate pilot program is scheduled to be in place in time for the 2013-14 academic year.

In addition, a group of first- and second-year students called the Residential Commons Student Leadership Corps “will help lead us into the future and discover what we want the Residential Commons to be going forward,” Grim says.

> Find answers to Frequently Asked Questions about SMU’s Residential Commons

Loyds make $5 million gift toward SMU’s Residential Commons

SMU Residential Commons Rendering 2012Paul B. Loyd Jr. ’68 and his wife, Penny Requa Loyd, are continuing their longtime support of SMU with a $5 million gift toward one of five new Residential Commons buildings designed to enhance SMU’s living-learning environment. Their gift was announced during SMU Founders’ Day Weekend at the groundbreaking ceremony for the Commons complex, scheduled to open in fall 2014.

Including this gift, the Loyds’ contributions to SMU have supported a variety of initiatives, most notably SMU Football’s Circle of Champions, the Mustang Band Hall, Meadows School of the Arts scholarships, the Sigma Alpha Epsilon House Fund, and the Paul B. Loyd, Jr. All-Sports Center, adjacent to Gerald J. Ford Stadium. The center, which opened in 2000 with Ford Stadium, houses locker rooms, offices, training and sports medicine facilities for SMU’s 17 sports teams.

The Loyds also provided funding in support of the new Penny and Paul Loyd Center for the Academic Development of Student Athletes (ADSA), housed in the All-Sports Center, which helps student-athletes maximize their athletic and academic potential.

“Nearly every SMU student benefits from the Loyd family’s generosity,” says SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “From students enhancing their study skills and preparing for exams at the Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center and the ADSA, to student athletes working out in the weight room, all in the Loyd All-Sports Center, the Loyds have enhanced the campus experience of SMU students. Now a new generation of students will enjoy living and learning in the Loyd Commons.”

Construction on the Residential Commons complex is under way in the southeast corner of the main campus, near Ford Stadium and the future George W. Bush Presidential Center. The complex will provide housing, parking and dining facilities for 1,250 students, enabling all first- and second-year SMU students to live on campus. Each residential facility will include a faculty residence and offices, classrooms and seminar rooms.

The Loyds serve as members of the SMU Parent Leadership Council. As of the May 2012 graduation of their daughter, three of their five children are SMU graduates. Kelly Loyd graduated in 1996 with a B.S. in economics. Jessica Requa earned in 2008 a B.A. in psychology and a B.B.A. in accounting as well as an M.S. in accounting in 2009. Sarah Requa received a B.A. degree in markets and culture and a B.A. in psychology at SMU’s 2012 Commencement.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

Students choose top professors in 2009 HOPE Awards

Wayne Shaw, 2009 HOPE Professor of the YearStudent staff members in SMU’s Department of Residence Life and Student Housing honored 55 University educators at the 2009 HOPE Awards Banquet in November. HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Award recipients are named through student staff member nominations as professors who “have made a significant impact to our academic education both inside and outside of the classroom.”

Wayne Shaw, Helmut Sohmen Distinguished Professor of Corporate Governance in the Cox School of Business, was honored as 2009 Professor of the Year. Three Dedman College professors – Mark Chancey, Religious Studies; Michael Lusztig, Political Science; and Tom Stone, English – were honored as Distinguished Professors, denoting that they have been recognized as HOPE Professors during at least 5 of the 12 years in which the honor has existed.

Read the complete list of honorees under the link below. Above, Professor of the Year Wayne Shaw (right in photo) with HOPE Committee member Ty Krueger, Fine Arts Community hall director.

(more…)

Four staff members receive 2008-09 Presidential Awards

presidential-staff-awards-2009-300.jpgFour exceptional SMU staff members received 2008-09 Presidential Staff Recognition Awards at a May 21 ceremony in the Dallas Hall Rotunda. The honors recognize individuals who have shown outstanding performance, commitment, and ability.

This year’s recipients:

Gretchen Voight, assistant registrar for academic ceremonies, received the Presidential Award for New Employee Excellence, given to an individual who has been with SMU for one to three consecutive years.

Brook Benton Jimenez, assistant director of fitness in the Department of Recreational Sports, Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports, received the Presidential Award for Continuing Excellence, given to an individual who has been with the University for four or more consecutive years.

Joe Gargiulo, chief information officer for Information Technology, received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Leadership, given to a staff member who supervises one or more benefit-eligible employees and who “demonstrates exceptional leadership ability within his or her unit or across the University.”

Amber Kosik, director of SMU’s Hilltop Scholars Community in Perkins and Smith Halls, Residence Life and Student Housing, received the Presidential Award for Innovation, given to a staff member whose “creative, innovative ideas … significantly improve a work process or system or greatly increase the efficiency of an operation or unit.”

Read more about the winners at the Staff Association homepage.

Right, 2008-09 Presidential Award for Staff Excellence winners (left to right): Amber Kosik, Brook Benton Jimenez, Joe Gargiulo and Gretchen Voight.

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