Calendar Highlights: Mustang Must-do’s for April 15, 2016

Religious Studies

Calendar Highlights: Mustang Must-do’s for April 15, 2016

Sing Song: Sing Song, the annual musical theater performance competition for SMU students hosted by SMU Program Council, is Friday, April 15 at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. The performances are centered on this year’s theme of “Twisted Tales” – featuring an updated take on traditional fairy tales. Tickets are available online.

Campaign Finale: SMU gathers Friday, April 15 to unveil a new campus monument recognizing major donors and to dedicate the new Crain Family Centennial Promenade, it will mark the finale to the University’s historic $1.15 billion Second Century Campaign. The community is invited to attend the ceremony at 6 p.m. on the South Plaza, near the Hughes-Trigg Student Center, followed by a festive celebration.

TEDx

Inside SMU: Inside SMU, scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 16 in Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall, is a full morning of topical discussions delivered by SMU faculty and students. The plenary session at 9 a.m. features Darwin Payne ’68, SMU historian and professor emeritus of communications, sharing “Ten Stories You Should Know about SMU.”

Meadows World Music Ensemble: Take a musical trip around the world with the World Music Ensemble spring concert. The performances will feature Arabic, Celtic, Indian and Greek music, and much more. Special guest artist Poovalur Sriji, a world-renowned virtuoso on the mridangam (Indian barrel drum), will perform his composition Jamming Saints. The event will be held on Sunday, April 17 from 6-8:30 p.m. in the Bob Hope Theatre and is free and open to the public.

Christianity in 2050: The Department of Religious Studies presents Philip Jenkins, Distinguished Professor of History at the Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor University. On Tuesday, April 19 from 4-5 p.m. in Dedman Life Sciences Building, room 131. Dr. Jenkins will discuss revolutionary religious change worldwide. For centuries, Christianity has had its strongest centers in Europe and North America, but the world now finds itself in rapid transformation. Christianity is growing rapidly in the Global South, especially in Africa and Asia, while traditional Western religion is under threat from secularization. Meanwhile, Christians find themselves in competition with other religions, including Islam. So what will Christianity look like in 2050? The event is free and open to the public.

Titans: Author Leila Meacham will give a free lecture and book signing for her new novel, Titans, on Thursday, April 21 in Mack Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center. An author’s reception will be held from 1-11:30 a.m. Tickets to the reception can be purchased for $30 (includes signed book and lunch). A complimentary light buffet will be served at 11:30 a.m. The lecture and book signing will begin at noon. No RSVP is required for the lecture.

April 15, 2016|Calendar Highlights|

Three named 2015-17 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors

Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors 2015-17

Jill DeTemple, Darius Miller and Yildirim Hürmüzlü were named SMU’s 2015-17 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors during the University’s Board of Trustees meeting in May.

Three of SMU’s best teachers have been named 2015-17 Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professors, as announced by the University’s Center for Teaching Excellence during the Board of Trustees meeting Thursday, May 7, 2015.

The 2015 honorees are Jill DeTemple, Religious Studies, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences; Yildirim Hürmüzlü, Mechanical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; and Darius Miller, Finance, Cox School of Business.

The new members of SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers will join returning members Jaime Clark-Soles, New Testament, Perkins School of Theology; Michael Lattman, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences; and Paige Ware, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

Each year since 2001, the Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Awards, named for SMU Trustee Ruth Altshuler, recognize SMU faculty members for their commitment to and achievements in fostering student learning.

“These are faculty whose concerns for higher education go beyond classroom boundaries and often the boundaries of their own discipline,” according to the CTE. “They represent the highest achievement in reaching the goals of higher education.”

Each recipient receives a $10,000 award and membership in SMU’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers for the two years of their appointment as Altshuler Professors. Members participate actively with other members of the Academy to address issues in classroom teaching.

(more…)

May 20, 2015|Faculty in the News, For the Record, News|

Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Ten SMU faculty members have received 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, and their projects:

• Tim Cassedy, English, Dedman College, for research at the Library of Congress for his book Language Makes the Difference, a history of ideas about language and identity at the turn of the 19th century.

• Michael Chmielewski, Psychology, Dedman College, to study the appropriateness of commonly used psychological tests and measures for diverse populations.

• Michael Corris, Art, Meadows School of the Arts, for interviews and illustration reproductions for his book The Armchair in the Studio: The Engagement of Art and Philosophy Since the 1960s.

• Benard Cummings, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, for a theatre adaptation of Babette’s Feast set during the Civil War.

• Kate Engel, Religious Studies, Dedman College, for archival research in Great Britain and Germany on international Protestantism at the time of the American Revolution.

• Blake Hackler, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, to take part in advanced training with the SITI Theatre ensemble and conduct research on embodied actor training methodologies.

• Andrea Meltzer, Psychology, Dedman College,  for a study of newlywed couples and weight-maintenance motivations.

• Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to support reproduction of images for her upcoming book on the Madonna of the Fire.

• Candace Walkington, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, to build a website containing mathematics problems that are personalized to middle and high school students’ interests.

• Eric White, Special Collections, Bridwell Library, to complete the first comprehensive documentary history of every surviving copy of the Gutenberg Bible, encompassing their discovery, changing ownership and rise in cultural significance.

November 7, 2013|For the Record, News, Research|

Research: Texas public-school Bible courses skirt state law

Stock photo of open BibleMost of the 60 public school districts in Texas that offer courses on the Bible aren’t meeting a 2007 state law mandating that those courses be fair as well as academically and legally sound, according to a new study by SMU religious studies expert Mark Chancey.

The study uncovered bias, factual errors and insufficient curriculum standards in Texas public school Bible courses. The report “Reading, Writing & Religion II” was carried out for the Austin-based education watchdog group Texas Freedom Network (TFN).

Chancey, a religious studies professor in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, recommends the Texas State Board of Education develop Bible course curriculum standards and the Texas Education Agency be allowed funds for a teacher training program. Chancey has devoted considerable attention to the constitutional, political and academic issues raised by religion courses in public schools.

“If public schools are going to have courses on the Bible, those courses need to be just as academically rigorous as courses in history, English, and math, not less rigorous. Some schools’ courses seemed more intent on promoting religious belief than religious literacy,” said Chancey, who reviewed tens of thousands of pages of material from Texas school districts.

“When public schools teach about religion, it’s essential that they do so in a way that does not promote some people’s religious beliefs over others,” he said. “Students and the Bible deserve our very best efforts, and at this point, as a state we’re not giving them that.”

Unable to lawfully insert creation science into science classes, some schools inserted it into Bible classes, Chancey said.

His research found, for example, that courses in several districts included efforts to reconcile a literalistic reading of the Genesis creation story with modern science. Some suggested that assuming lengthy gaps of time between each of the six days of creation explained why scientists believed the earth is so old. Several courses implied that belief in evolution was incompatible with being religious.

“One course’s materials even included a religious tract claiming that NASA had discovered a missing day in time that corresponded to the story of the sun standing still in the biblical book of Joshua,” Chancey said. “The first time I heard this claim, I did what any reasonable person would do: I called NASA. I knew that this story was an urban legend, of course, and NASA was able to direct me to a web page discrediting it.”

Written by Denise Gee

> Read the full story from the SMU Research blog

 

February 5, 2013|Research|

For the Record: May 2012

The SMU Office of Public Affairs received 10 awards in 8 different categories in the 2012 Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) District IV competition. Nicole SantosMelinda Matthews, Laura Graham, Karen Shoholm and Vicki Olvera, Integrated Marketing and Advertising, won a Gold Award in the Design category for “Say Hello to SMU,” the University’s new admission brochure. Sarah Hanan and Kathleen Tibbetts, News and Communications, won the Gold and Silver Awards in the Blogs category for SMU Adventures and SMU ForumHillsman S. Jackson, Laura GrahamPatti LaSalle, Mitch WhittenSherry MyresKaren Shoholm and Nancy George received the Silver Award in the Institutional Relations category for the University’s Centennial picture book, SMU: Unbridled Vision (pictured).

Pat Ward, Public Affairs/Periodicals, brought home the Silver Award in the Newsletters category for the Central University Libraries newsletter, Annotations. Brooke Carlock, Karen Shoholm, Melinda Matthews and Vicki Olvera, Integrated Marketing and Advertising, won the Bronze Award in the Design – Special Pieces category for the President’s Associates calendar and Academic Programs booklet. Brittney Wallace, Integrated Marketing and Advertising, earned a Bronze Award for Design Improvement for the President’s Scholars recruitment brochure.

The Development and External Affairs team won a Bronze Award for Institutional Relations for The Second Century Celebration. Denise Gee, News and Communications, won a Bronze Award in the Writing Collection category for her portfolio focused on the University’s human rights programs. Eva Parks, News and Communications, received an Honorable Mention in the Electronic Communications category for the Fall 2011 “SMU in the News” video.

Irina Dumitrescu, English, Dedman College, has received a 24-month Humboldt Research Fellowship to begin August 1, 2012. The award allows postdoctoral researchers who have completed their doctorates within the past four years to carry out a long-term research project (6 to 24 months) in cooperation with an academic host of their choosing at a research institution in Germany. Dumitrescu’s host institution is the Free University of Berlin, where she will work with Andrew James Johnston in the Institute for English Language and Literature. Her Humboldt-funded project, “The Drama of Grammar: Second-Language Learning in Early England,” will examine the ways in which vivid, surprising, and often scandalous grammar texts used to teach Latin and French during the Middle Ages shaped the emotional lives of students and taught them innovative ways to engage with literature.

Jennifer Dworak, Computer Science and Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, has received a Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award from the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Consortium. The awards provide seed money for research by junior faculty at ORAU member institutions to enrich their research and professional growth.

'Revelations in Business' book cover

Johan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Dedman College, gave an invited talk on “Buddhism and Islam on the Silk Road” at Stanford University’s Center for East Asian Studies April 26, 2012. The lecture was sponsored by the Silk Road Foundation and the Stanford Humanities Center, Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, Ho Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for East Asian Studies, Department of Religious Studies, and Department of History.

K. Shelette Stewart, Executive Education, Cox School of Business, has written Revelations in Business: Connecting Your Business Plan with God’s Purpose and Plan for Your Life (pictured), published by Tate Publishing. She is also the narrator of the audio edition, currently available at Amazon.com

May 23, 2012|For the Record|
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