Another generation of SMU Civil Rights Pilgrims set out on March 4, 2016

Another generation of SMU Civil Rights Pilgrims set out on March 4, 2016

This years travelers with the SMU Civil Rights Pilgrimage will experience a different kind of spring break. They’ll join 50 others on an eight-day bus journey (March 4-12) to experience the history of the civil rights movement firsthand. I will be one of those lucky travelers.


This program, started in 2004, continues to grow each year. In 2008, the pilgrimage joined forces with Dr. Dennis Simon‘s Political Science course. Now the trip is also a requirement for undergraduate human rights majors and is offered to students in the Master of Liberal Studies Program.

Ray Jordan, trip leader, pastor and professor, came to our first class to discuss the pilgrimage. I wasn’t too excited about having a night class during my last semester in college, but Jordan made me excited about what was to come this semester. I was amazed by how far back the history of the pilgrimage went. This spring break, I’ll not only be experiencing years of American history but also years of SMU history. I’ll take part in an experience that is an integral part of what being an SMU student is all about.

Our journey will take us through the history of the civil rights movement. We’ll begin in Little Rock and visit Central High School and then move to Selma and walk across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. We’ll be around for the anniversary of Bloody Sunday and then continue on through Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. We’ll meet former marchers, journalists, and activists. We’ll be meeting, as Dr. Simon describes, “the ordinary who accomplished extraordinary things.” Even with the itinerary in hand, I still am not sure what all I’ll be experiencing, but I’m sure it will all be worthwile. In just two weeks, I’ll be able to attach a face and a story to the names Dr. Simon has repeatedly mentioned in our Thursday night class.

As a book worm myself, I’m most excited to meet those whose memoirs we’ve read throughout the semester. Their stories of struggle and triumph are invigorating and well-written. They’re able to recount painful memories with eloquence and charge. For example, on March 8, we’ll be visiting with Rev. Robert Graetz, the author of A White Preacher’s Memoir. Graetz was assigned as pastor to Trinity Lutheran Church in the black community in Montgomery, Alabama. His memoir honestly retells the “brutal and dehumanizing treatment” of blacks and has already left an impact on my classmates and I. I can’t even imagine what it will be like to hear his experiences in person.

I’ve wanted to take part in this trip since I was a freshman, but it wasn’t until I declared my human rights major last spring that I knew for a fact that this is how I would spend my last spring break in college. I don’t think there could be a better way to round off my experience as a political science and human rights student at SMU.

Students on this year’s pilgrimage have every intent of recording events as they take place, so keep an eye out to hear about their emotional, educational and impactful experiences throughout the week.

Click here to learn more about SMU’s Civil Rights Pilgrimage and stay tuned to hear about this year’s pilgrims.

March 2, 2016|News|

Nearly 50 will make 2009 Civil Rights Pilgrimage March 6

Lawrence Huggins with the SMU Civil Rights Pilgrimage 2008Nearly 50 SMU community members will leave campus March 6 for a journey into living history. The 2009 Civil Rights Pilgrimage departs at 3 p.m. for an 8-day bus ride to the South’s civil rights landmarks.

This year’s contingent includes 18 undergraduates and 8 Master of Liberal Studies students, as well as 20 staff and other SMU community members, says Dennis Simon. Simon and Matthew Wilson, both associate professors of political science in SMU’s Dedman College, will make the pilgrimage, along with CRP Trip Coordinator Ray Jordan of the Office of the Chaplain and Religious Life.

Participants “will meet and talk with the keepers of history,” says Simon, whose undergraduate course “Basic Issues in American Democracy” includes a focus on civil rights issues. “This trip helps to achieve what I call immersion – students will see and experience what they’ve been studying in my class.”

The 8-day journey includes stops in Little Rock, Arkansas; Selma (for the Bloody Sunday anniversary), Montgomery, Tuscaloosa and Birmingham, Alabama; Oxford, Mississippi; and Memphis, Tennessee.

Watch the SMU Forum for more news about the 2009 Pilgrimage. (Above, 2008 pilgrimage participants visit Brown Chapel AME Church where the Selma-to-Montgomery marches were staged and to which marchers retreated on Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965. Coach Lawrence Huggins, a teacher at the time of the marches, is standing in front of the group.)

Learn more about the Civil Rights Pilgrimage at the SMU Chaplain’s website

March 6, 2009|News|
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