Perkins School of Theology

Expert in Latin and Hispanic theologies Fernando Segovia visits SMU’s Perkins School of Theology March 31-April 11, 2014

Fernando SegoviaA noted expert in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Hispanic theologies has come to the Hilltop as a visiting scholar.

Dr. Fernando Segovia will be in residence in the Center for the Study of Latino/a Christianity and Religions in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology March 31-April 11, 2014.

Segovia is the Oberlin Graduate Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity in Vanderbilt University Divinity School, where he has taught since 1984. He is also a member of the theology faculty of Stellenbosch University in South Africa.

He teaches and researches in the fields of early Christian origins, theological studies, and cultural studies, including non-Western Christian theologies, postcolonial, minority and diaspora studies. Segovia has served on the editorial boards of several academic journals, has worked as consultant for foundations and publishing houses, and has lectured both nationally and internationally. He is also a past president of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians in the United States.

He is editor, with Roland Boer, of The Future of the Biblical Past and of A Postcolonial Commentary on the New Testament Writings, with R. S. Sugirtharajah.

Segovia will preach, lecture and participate in a number of public and academic events during his tenure. Two events are open to the public:

• Dr. Segovia will preach during the annual Archbishop Romero Memorial Service in Perkins Chapel at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 2. His homily is titled “Romero and the Call to Bear Fruit in the World.”

• On Thursday, April 3, Segovia will give a public lecture, “Vatican II in Retrospect: A Lifetime and Welcome Companion,” in the Prothro Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. Carlos Cardoza-Orlandi, professor of global Christianities and mission studies in the Perkins School, will present a Response. The event begins with refreshments at 5:30 p.m., followed by the Lecture and Response at 6 p.m.

“I am delighted to welcome Dr. Segovia to Perkins School of Theology and to SMU,” said the Rev. Dr. Hugo Magallanes, director of the Center. “He is world class scholar, the current president of the Society of Biblical Literature, and to have him with us for two weeks is a great honor. His teaching and writings are quite influential in general, and in particular in the area of Biblical interpretation from a post-colonial perspective,” he said.

> Read more from the Perkins School of Theology website

A Monday Celebration of Lights kicks off SMU’s 2013 holiday season

SMU holiday lights at night on the Main Quad

The holiday season goes into high gear at SMU with a rare weekday observance of one of the University’s most beloved annual traditions. Celebration of Lights 2013 is scheduled for 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2 on the Main Quad.

The celebration features than 100,000 decorative lights, luminarias lining the sidewalks, musicians performing songs of the season, and SMU President R. Gerald Turner reading the Christmas story from the New Testament. Refreshments will be served. Check out slideshows and video of past Celebration of Lights ceremonies, courtesy of SMU News. Photos

Other highly anticipated holiday events:

• On Thursday, Dec. 5, SMU’s Perkins School of Theology celebrates its Advent/Christmas Worship Service  at 4 p.m and 8 p.m. in Perkins Chapel with the theme “…A child shall lead.” Children of Perkins faculty and staff members will join Dean William Lawrence and Associate Dean Evelyn Parker as readers for the services. The program also features music from the Perkins Seminary Singers directed by C. Michael Hawn; Meadows School of the Arts’ women’s ensemble, Diva Dolce (4 p.m.), directed by Robert Ward; the Children’s Chorus of Greater Dallas’ Women’s Youth Chorus (8 p.m.) directed by Kelly Pfaffenberger; and Perkins organist Christoper Anderson. Admission is free; food and cash donations for the North Texas Food Bank will be accepted in the chapel narthex at the entrance. For more information, contact Teresa Rosado, 214-768-2502.

• President and Mrs. R. Gerald Turner will host their annual All-University Holiday Party from 3:30-5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19, in the Martha Proctor Mack Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

• The Guildhall at SMU hosts its Winter Exhibition on Friday, Dec. 20, at SMU-in-Plano. Graduating students in art creation, level design, production and programming will show their work, and attendees will have the opportunity to play games designed by students in multiple cohorts.

• The University celebrates its 2013 December Commencement Convocation at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 21, in Moody Coliseum. Retired and current faculty members will assemble for procession in academic dress no later than 9:45 a.m. in the Blanton Student Services Building lobby. Prior to the ceremony, a faculty breakfast will be served beginning at 8:45 a.m. in the Blanton Building. RSVP online for the faculty breakfast and processional and learn more about the ceremony.

SMU Board of Trustees raises campaign goal to $1 billion

Bolstered by the success to date of SMU’s Second Century Campaign, the University’s Board of Trustees has raised the goal from $750 million to $1 billion.

At its quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 13, the board voted unanimously to accept the new goal recommended by the campaign’s leadership.

The campaign seeks additional funds for scholarships, academic programs, faculty positions and campus improvements and facilities.

SMU already has surpassed its original goal and timetable, raising $780 million for a campaign scheduled to end in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the University’s opening. That date is now set to mark another milestone – the completion of SMU’s first $1 billion campaign.

SMU will join only 12 other private universities currently seeking goals of $1 billion or more. Among them are Columbia, Duke, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, the University of Chicago and the University of Southern California. SMU is the first comprehensive university in North Texas to seek that amount.

“The generosity of our donors, the strength of our campaign leadership and the hard work of volunteers around the globe have resulted in record-breaking support for SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Even during uncertain economic times, our donors kept the momentum of the campaign going. They did not skip a beat in continuing to fund SMU’s rise in quality and reputation.”

Gerald J. Ford, trustee and convening co-chair of the campaign, said, “The notable investment made in SMU through the campaign demonstrates the University’s positive trajectory and unprecedented momentum. Raising and achieving the campaign goal is the next logical step for SMU as it expands its national and global impact.”

“Adding to SMU’s momentum during its Centennial era, 2011-2015, is the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library, Museum and Institute,” Turner said. “This resource has attracted joint programming, concurrent appointments of SMU faculty and Bush fellows, visiting dignitaries, heightened visibility and more than 206,000 visitors to campus thus far. The support attracted by this resource has already been a tremendous benefit to the campus, city and nation.”

The funding campaign for the Bush Center, conducted by the Bush Foundation, proceeded separately from SMU’s Second Century Campaign, although at the same time. The Bush funding campaign raised more than $500 million for construction, programming and endowment for the Bush Center. “The campaigns have been synergistic, achieving mutual success,” Turner said.

Read about the $1 billion campaign goal in The Dallas Morning News.

Important SMU Priorities

Raising the campaign goal to $1 billion will provide gifts to fund additional scholarships, endowed faculty positions, academic programs and campus life enhancements, including new facilities.

Faculty and academic leadership positions targeted for endowments include those in areas such as entrepreneurship, biostatistics, science and technology law, the impact of the arts on communities, art history, theological studies and library support.

Academic programs earmarked for new endowments and operational support represent areas of growing importance to the region and nation, among them programs in energy management, public policy, interdisciplinary studies, cyber security, arts research and K-12 school leadership.

Increased scholarship funding is being sought to support top undergraduate and graduate students throughout the University. These resources will ensure that SMU can educate the next generation of leaders in areas such as the arts, sciences, business and engineering, disciplines that, with others, are critical to the future of Dallas.

Capital projects for academics include the renovation of Fondren Library Center in Central University Libraries and Bridwell Library in Perkins School of Theology. In addition, funding is being sought for new campus facilities, such as the Residential Commons complex and the Mustang Band Hall, now under construction. The campaign also seeks to complete funding for renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and construction of new complexes for tennis, golf and other sports, along with operational support for athletics.

SMU Board of Trustees chair and campaign co-chair Caren Prothro emphasized the case for going forward with a new goal: “The campaign has achieved remarkable results that can be seen in our impressive gains throughout the University, but its momentum tells us that much more can be accomplished. On behalf of the students we seek to serve and the faculty who help to shape their futures, we need additional resources for scholarships to attract the best among them and continue to increase our diversity. We need to recruit and retain faculty devoted to teaching, research and creativity with an impact on their disciplines and society. We want to establish and support new academic programs that will prepare students for leadership in their professions and communities. And we must provide the best facilities for these endeavors in a living-learning environment that is second to none.”

To Mike Boone, chair-elect of the SMU Board of Trustees, the University stands at a crossroads of opportunity and is ready to take a bold step forward. “At critical times in Dallas’ history, the city has been transformed by decisions that resulted in world-class assets for our community. Among these are an airport that serves as a global hub, a thriving arts district, a distinguished medical school producing Nobel laureates and a vibrant business community. Our new campaign goal signals the unequivocal commitment to join the list of milestones that have changed our community and its impact on the world.”

Results and Impact

To date, the campaign has raised funds for 472 new scholarships; 24 academic programs such as new schools, institutes and centers; 34 endowed faculty positions, bringing SMU’s total to 96 out of a goal of 100; and 26 capital projects, including new or expanded facilities for libraries, academic programs and athletics.

Many of the new academic programs SMU has created have direct impact on the Dallas region, such as new centers for legal services and financial studies. Schools recently endowed are the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering and the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, which focuses on school reform and programs for community impact. Other programs contribute to research and dialogue on important national and international issues, such as the Scholars Program of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, focusing on public policy and service, and the Embrey Human Rights Program. Still other resources, among them expanded acquisitions for the Meadows Museum and a new National Center for Arts Research, broaden the city’s reputation in the arts internationally.

In another measure of impact and rising quality, the average SAT score of entering students has risen from 1144 in 1999 to 1302 in 2013, thanks to increasing resources for scholarships.

“These resources bring outstanding students to Dallas and help to keep our bright local students in our region, all of which enriches the talent pool here,” said Carl Sewell, trustee and campaign co-chair. “Funding for new academic positions has enabled us to attract and retain scholars from throughout the world. Professors named to endowed chairs are distinguished scholars at the top of their careers and reputations,” he added. “They bring important research projects and work not only with graduate students, but also with undergraduates, mentoring them and involving them in their research.”

Ray L. Hunt, trustee and campaign co-chair, notes that increased academic resources “enable SMU to be nimble in creating new programs in emerging fields.” Examples include centers in alternative asset management, engineering leadership, and global markets and freedom. “Access to these programs will help our graduates to compete and lead in key areas where new expertise and perspectives are needed and will increase their contributions to critical areas for our nation and the world.”

As SMU changes with the impact of the campaign, “the community will be better served and Dallas will have the distinguished university it deserves,” said Mike Boone. “Regional leaders know that as SMU rises as a center of ideas, knowledge and service, our region will be strengthened as a global center of commerce and culture. Campaign resources have strengthened not only the University, but also the economic vitality of the region,” he said. “SMU is both an indicator and a predictor of success for Dallas and our region. We will continue to prosper together.”

Campaign Participation and Leadership

Thus far 58,159 donors have made one or more gifts to the campaign. This includes 279 who have given $100,000 or more, and 123 who have committed $1 million or more, an all-time high for SMU.

SMU’s campaign goals also include giving levels among alumni. The campaign seeks gifts from 25 percent of alumni each year and from 50 percent over the course of the campaign. Thus far more than 50 percent of SMU alumni have made one or more gifts during the campaign. A record 24 percent of alumni provided gifts in the fiscal year ending May 31, 2013, representing the highest number of alumni ever to give to SMU in a single year.

“The concept of a billion dollars may seem overwhelming, but the fact is that it will take gifts of all sizes for us to meet our new goal,” said Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler, a trustee and campaign co-chair. “So we’re asking our alumni to take part at any level they can afford. It all counts, and it all makes a difference. Together, we are living up to the theme of our campaign, SMU Unbridled.”

The Second Century Campaign is led by five co-chairs: Convening co-chair Gerald J. Ford, with Ruth Altshuler, Ray L. Hunt, Caren H. Prothro and Carl Sewell. They lead a 15-member Campaign Executive Council and nearly 40 Steering Committee co-chairs spearheading various fundraising efforts, such as those for each school, the libraries, athletics and student life. Regional campaigns range from New York to Los Angeles and from Mexico City to Hong Kong. Campaign committee members total more than 350 worldwide, and hundreds of others are providing volunteer support.

Civil rights legend to offer keynote in SMU symposium Sept. 6, 2013

Rev. James L. Lawson

Rev. James L. Lawson will give the keynote speech in a civil rights symposium at SMU Sept. 6, 2013.

On the heels of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, renowned civil rights and social justice leaders and scholars will be at SMU to discuss the future.

“The End of Civil Rights in America? Reflections on the Future of Economic Justice from the Perspectives of Law and Religion” takes place 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, in Karcher Auditorium, Storey Hall, in the SMU Law Quad.

Sponsored by SMU’s Perkins School of Theology and Dedman School of Law, the daylong symposium will focus on efforts to overcome economic injustices tied to racial inequality, and examine what work still needs to be done.

The keynote speaker will be Rev. James Lawson, a legendary civil rights activist who worked closely with King and was influential in shaping the movement’s nonviolent resistance strategy.

Symposium speakers and their presentations (with question-and-answer time) include:

  • Willie Baptist, Union Theological Seminary Poverty Initiative scholar-in-residence in New York City: “Reigniting Martin Luther King’s Poor People’s Campaign Today: From Civil Rights to Human Rights”
  • Jim Harrington, Austin attorney, founder-director of Texas Civil Rights Project and adjunct University of Texas School of Law instructor: “Private Actions to Enforce Civil Rights Laws”
  • John Martin, Dallas attorney: “Government Enforcement of Voting Rights Laws”
  • Evelyn L. Parker, SMU Perkins School of Theology associate dean for academic affairs and professor of practical theology: “Young Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice: A Litany of Issues”
  • Joerg Rieger, Perkins School of Theology Wendland-Cook Professor of Constructive Theology: “Why Both Race and Class Matter in Religion: Taking the Long View”
  • Eliot Shavin, attorney and SMU Dedman School of Law lecturer: “Wealth As a Suspect Classification and The Economic Bill of Rights”
  • Theodore Walker, Jr., SMU Perkins School of Theology associate professor of ethics and society: “Beyond Civil Rights to Economic Rights: Prescriptions from the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.”

The event is open to the public; admission is free for SMU students, staff and faculty. Registration is required and seating is limited. To register, contact Lisa Montes and include a name, e-mail address and phone number.

> Read more from SMU News

26 SMU professors receive tenure, promotions for 2013-14

Twenty-six outstanding SMU faculty members will begin the 2013-14 academic year with promotions after receiving tenure as associate professors or being named to full professorships.

The following individuals received tenure or promotion in May 2013:

Cox School of Business

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Maribeth Kuenzie, Management and Organizations

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Kumar Venkataraman, Finance

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Sabri Ates, History
  • Pamela Corley, Political Science
  • Pavel Nadolsky, Physics
  • William (Luke) Robinson, Philosophy
  • John Wise, Biological Sciences

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Vladimir Ajaev, Mathematics
  • Denise DuPont, World Languages (Spanish)
  • Serge Frolov, Religious Studies
  • Werner Horsthemke, Chemistry
  • Robert Howell, Philosophy
  • Bonnie Jacobs, Earth Sciences
  • Alexis McCrossen, History
  • Renee McDonald, Psychology
  • David Son, Chemistry

Lyle School of Engineering

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Usama El-Shamy, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • LiGuo Huang, Computer Science and Engineering

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Paul Krueger, Mechanical Engineering
  • Dinesh Rajan, Electrical Engineering

Meadows School of the Arts

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Sarah Allen, Music
  • Jack Greenman, Theatre
  • Xi Wang, Music

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Ira Greenberg, Creative Computation

Perkins School of Theology

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Elaine Heath, Evangelism
  • Evelyn Parker, Practical Theology

SMU examines the costs of capital punishment April 15-18, 2013

The Goddess of Liberty statue, Capitol Building, State of TexasAs the State of Texas draws closer to executing the 500th death row inmate since capital punishment resumed here in 1982, a multidisciplinary symposium on the SMU campus will address “Death By Numbers: What Moral, Legal and Economic Price Are We Paying to Maintain the Death Penalty?” April 15-18, 2013.

“Such a morbid milestone should make us stop and look at the record number of people being executed, the high cost of maintaining capital punishment and the increasing number of states eliminating it,” says Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program, the symposium’s sponsor.

Since the modern era, nearly 40 percent of all U.S. executions have occurred in Texas. “That significant number should make us wonder why this state so eagerly embraces capital punishment, despite evidence that mistakes have been made,” Halperin says.

All symposium events are free and open to the public. They include:

April 15 — The Legal Path to Execution, noon to 1:30 p.m., 201 Florence Hall. Dedman School of Law faculty will discuss the development of the U.S. Supreme Court’s limitations on capital punishment, the trend among states to abolish the death penalty, profiles of people who have been executed and changes that a person can undergo during incarceration. Panelists will be associate professor Vicki Palacios, assistant professor Meghan Ryan and instructor/mitigation specialist Vince Gonzales.

April 17 — Capital Punishment: Theological Perspectives, 12:30 to 1:25 p.m., Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. Faculty members from Perkins School of Theology will discuss the death penalty from the vantage points of their academic disciplines. Panelists will be Susanne Scholz, associate professor of Old Testament; Joerg Rieger, Wendland-Cook Endowed Professor of Constructive Theology; Theodore Walker Jr., associate professor of ethics and society; and Joseph Allen, Professor Emeritus of Ethics. Note: Lunch can be purchased for $5 in the Prothro Hall Refectory at 12:15 p.m.; food and beverages will be allowed in the Great Hall.

April 18 — Literary, Societal & Economic Impacts of the Death Penalty, 7 to 9 p.m., 131 Dedman Life Sciences Building. Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences professors Dick Hawkins (Sociology), Mike Holahan (English), Steve Sverdlik (Philosophy) and Beth Wheaton (Economics) will engage in a panel discussion moderated by Dallas Morning News Editorial Writer Tod Robberson.

“Lighting the Torch of Conscience” — On May 7, closer to the projected date of the 500th execution, the Embrey Human Rights Program will sponsor the “Lighting the Torch of Conscience” demonstration expected to be the largest anti-death penalty event ever held in Dallas. It will include a press conference and vigil at 6 p.m. in front of the Dallas County Old Red Courthouse, 100 S. Houston Street in downtown Dallas, where public lynchings once took place.

For more details, contact Sherry Aikman, 214-768-8347.

Written by Denise Gee

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 18, 2013

President's Day graphic

Giving art meaning: Artist David Mackenzie will be at SMU tonight, Monday, Feb. 18, as part of the Visiting Artist Lecture Series. Mackenzie explores art through videos and performances focusing on identity, race and how people represent themselves in public. His work has been described as brief but powerful. Originally from Jamaica, he received a B.F.A. in printmaking from the University of the Arts. The lecture is free and open to the public and starts at 6:30 p.m. in 241 Umphrey Lee Center.

The Naples DocumentsStanton Sharp Lecture: The Clements Department of History invites you to a lecture by Kenneth J. Andrien, SMU’s Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Chair in History. He will speak on the historic Naples documents, whose discovery in 1996 presented a challenge to the historical understanding of the Inca Empire and Spanish conquest. Andrien will explain these controversies and speak on whether he believes the documents are authentic. The lecture takes place Wednesday, Feb. 20, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. A reception will be held at 6 p.m. with the lecture following at 6:30 p.m.

SMU vs. The Great Debaters: SMU will face Wiley College in a public debate Wednesday, Feb. 20. The last time SMU took on the Marshall, Texas-based college was back in 2009. The topic of the debate is to be determined but will focus on a timely controversy that is of interest to the public. The debate starts at 7 p.m. in O’Donnell Hall, 2130 Owen Arts Center.

Arlene Sanchez WalshParar de Sufrir: The Center for the Study of Latino/a Christianity and Religions in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology welcomes Arlene Sánchez Walsh, speaking on “Parar de Sufrir: Health, Wealth, and Suffering in the Latino/a Religious Imagination.” Dr. Sánchez Walsh is an associate professor of church history at Azusa Pacific University and the 2012-13 visiting scholar for the Center. She is an expert in Pentecostal studies, one of the fastest-growing Christian movements, and has published works in this area. The lecture starts at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21 in 121 Prothro Hall. It is free and open to the public and will include refreshments. For more information, contact Josefrayn Sánchez-Perry.

MWE: As part of Black History Month, SMU’s Meadows Wind Ensemble will perform an I Have A Dream concert featuring a reading of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech performed by Meadows alum Donnie Ray Albert and a gospel collaboration with the Hamilton Park Baptist Church Men’s Choir. Albert will also perform two spirituals. The performances begin at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. Buy tickets online or contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

SMU celebrates the 2012 holiday season

SMU holiday lights at night on the Main Quad

The December holidays deliver some of SMU’s most beloved annual traditions. Save the dates for these 2012 events:

• The Student Foundation’s 2012 Celebration of Lights begins at 7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, on the University’s Main Quad. More than 100,000 decorative lights will fill the trees, luminarias will line the sidewalks, musicians will perform songs of the season, and SMU President R. Gerald Turner will follow a 35-year-old tradition of reading the Christmas story from the New Testament. Hot chocolate, apple cider and cookies will be served starting at 6:30. Check out slideshows and video of past Celebration of Lights ceremonies, courtesy of SMU News. Photos

• On Thursday, Dec. 6, SMU’s Perkins School of Theology celebrates its Advent/Christmas Worship Service in Perkins Chapel with readings and music from Perkins professors, students and alumni at 4 p.m and 8 p.m. This year’s service focuses on John 1:5 – “The light shines in the darkness….” Admission is free; food and cash donations for the North Texas Food Bank will be accepted in the chapel narthex at the entrance. For more information, contact Teresa Rosado, 214-768-2502. Read more about the service.

• President and Mrs. R. Gerald Turner will host their annual All-University Holiday Party – this year dubbed the “Santatennial Holiday Celebration” – from 3:30-5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13, in the Martha Proctor Mack Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

• The Guildhall at SMU hosts the Cohort 16 Winter Exhibition noon-6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, at SMU-in-Plano. Graduating students in art creation, level design and programming will show their work, and attendees will have the opportunity to play games designed by students in Cohorts 16, 18 and 19.

• The University celebrates its 2012 December Graduation Ceremony at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, in Moody Coliseum. Retired and current faculty members will assemble for procession in academic dress no later than 9:45 a.m. in the Blanton Student Services Building lobby. Prior to the ceremony, a faculty breakfast will be served beginning at 8:45 a.m. in the Blanton Building. RSVP online for the faculty breakfast and processional and learn more about the ceremony.

Seven SMU professors receive 2012-13 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Seven SMU faculty members have received Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Sam Taylor Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for 2012-13, and their projects:

• Carlos Cardoza-Orlandi, Perkins School of Theology, for a project on cross-cultural short-term mission trips and partnerships.

• Erin Hochman, History, Dedman College, for research investigating German-Austrian nationalism and history between the two World Wars.

• Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology, Dedman College, for a study investigating how children interpret marital conflict.

• Alicia Meuret, Psychology, Dedman College, for a study on the impact of stress on self-injuring behavior.

• Amy Pinkham, Psychology, Dedman College, to collect data comparing social cognition in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.

• Lorelei Rowe, Psychology, Dedman College, to extend a preventive program and study on reducing sexual victimization among teen girls.

• Sze-kar Wan, Perkins School of Theology, for consultation with mainland Chinese scholars on political theology and their engagement with continental Europen philosophers.

For more information on the Fellowships, including application instructions, contact Kathleen Hugley-Cook, director of the University’s Office of National Fellowships and Awards.

Visit SMU’s National Fellowships and Awards homepage

SMU experts, organizations teach an electoral college in 2012

Stock photo of 'Vote' buttonsA host of Election 2012 events at SMU will offer opportunities for enlightenment, discussion and debate as election day approaches. Understand what makes presidents tick, analyze election issues and discuss the presidential debates at SMU events open to the community as well as students, faculty and staff.

A small sampling:

Texas Faith Public Forum: Perkins School of Theology Dean William Lawrence will join a panel of journalists and North Texas pastors of diverse faith traditions to discuss how the 2012 election is helping to define the national interest. “Elections and the Common Good” begins at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, in the Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. The panel will be moderated by Dallas Morning News editorial columnist William McKenzie and senior political writer Wayne Slater of the newspaper’s Texas Faith blog. Free and open to the public.

• Presidential Debate Series: View the televised presidential debates in SMU’s O’Donnell Recital Hall, then participate in debates about them moderated by faculty and members of the SMU Speech and Debate Program. Events are scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 3Thursday, Oct. 11Tuesday, Oct. 16, and Monday, Oct. 22. All are free, and all begin at 7 p.m.

Election 2012 Preview: Political science professors Cal Jillson, Dennis Simon and Matthew Wilson will discuss the trends, issues and voter groups critical in determining the outcomes of various races in a Godbey Lecture Series event Monday, Oct. 15. The 6 p.m. lecture will be preceded by a 5:30 p.m. wine reception; all events are held at Maggiano’s, NorthPark Center. The event is part of a Godbey series on Election 2012; the cost is $45 per lecture for Godbey Lecture Series members, $65 for nonmembers. Attend all three lectures for $135 (member price) or $195 (nonmember price). Register online or call 214-768-2532.

Secrets From the White House Kitchen: Recipes, anecdotes and samples of White House kitchen fare are on the menu when Secrets from the White House Kitchens author John R. Hanny III speaks, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16. The evening includes a lecture, signed book and hors d’oeuvres. Cost is $99. Register online through SMU’s Continuing and Professional Education site.

The Economy and Election Outcomes: Which economic outcomes seem to matter most to voters? Do macroeconomic fluctuations exhibit cycles related to the electoral cycle? Economics professor Nathan Balke discusses economic implications for the November elections in “It’s Always ‘The Economy, Stupid’” – a Godbey Lecture Series event Monday, Oct. 29. The 6 p.m. lecture will be preceded by a 5:30 p.m. wine reception; all events are held at Maggiano’s, NorthPark Center. The event is part of a Godbey series on Election 2012; the cost is $45 per lecture for Godbey Lecture Series members, $65 for nonmembers. Attend all three lectures for $135 (member price) or $195 (nonmember price). Register online or call 214-768-2532.

Election 2012 Analysis: Political science professors Cal Jillson, Dennis Simon and Matthew Wilson assess turning points in presidential and congressional campaigns and analyze voting results in this Godbey Lecture Series event Monday, Nov. 12. The 6 p.m. lecture will be preceded by a 5:30 p.m. wine reception; all events are held at Maggiano’s, NorthPark Center. The event is part of a Godbey series on Election 2012; the cost is $45 per lecture for Godbey Lecture Series members, $65 for nonmembers. Attend all three lectures for $135 (member price) or $195 (nonmember price). Register online or call 214-768-2532.

> Find more election experts at SMU News

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