Paul Ludden

$5 million gift will help build new Residential Commons dining center

Anita and Truman Arnold have given $5 million toward construction of the Anita and Truman Arnold Dining Commons in SMU’s new Residential Commons complex.

Now under construction, this facility joins five residence halls and a parking garage, all of which will accommodate 1,250 students and several faculty as members of a shared campus community.

“We are deeply grateful to the Arnolds for their generous support,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “This dining facility will be the centerpiece of our new Residential Commons complex and will be an important element of the campus experience for countless present and future students.”

The Arnolds’ gift counts toward the $750 million goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date has raised more than $732 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

Chronicle of Higher Education: Colleges Design New Housing to Engage and Retain Students

The new Residential Commons complex is expected to open in Fall 2014 in the southeast quadrant of the campus adjacent to Ford Stadium and Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports. The addition of these residential facilities will enable SMU to implement a new requirement that sophomores, as well as first-year students, live on campus.

The complex of new facilities is part of a larger SMU initiative to establish a residential commons living-learning model that will include renovation of six current residence halls that are being retrofitted to become residential commons. On-campus living beyond the first year has been linked to higher student retention rates at universities offering this benefit.

“By including facilities for live-in faculty members, who also will have offices and teach classes in the Residential Commons, this complex will provide students with an integrated academic and living experience,” said Paul Ludden, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs.

Find answers to Frequently Asked Questions about SMU’s Residential Commons

“This model supports a strong residential community with a balance between academic and social aspects of campus life,” said Lori S. White, vice president for student affairs. “Each commons will develop activities and traditions that build a sense of community and encourage lasting ties among the student residents.”

All students and faculty living in the five residential units of the complex will share meals in the Anita and Truman Arnold Dining Commons, which also will be open to other students. The 29,658-square-foot dining commons will have a seating capacity of 500.

> Read more from SMU News

2013 Fall General Faculty Meeting takes place Aug. 28

Originally posted Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013.

SMU President R. Gerald Turner will address the University faculty at the Fall General Faculty Meeting Wednesday, Aug. 28 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. The meeting will begin at 3:45 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Theater, following a reception beginning at 3 p.m. in the Theater foyer.

Newly tenured faculty will receive their regalia during the meeting. In addition, Faculty Senate President Santanu Roy will give the Senate’s report, and Provost Paul Ludden will announce the winner of the 2012-13 Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award from the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of The United Methodist Church.

SMU joins university consortium to offer courses online

SMU has joined a consortium of prestigious universities to offer a limited number of live, online courses for academic credit through Semester Online. The program will begin in fall 2013.

Approved University undergraduates will have the opportunity to take classes taught by faculty who teach the same courses at Boston College, Brandeis University, Emory University, Northwestern University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Notre Dame and Washington University in St. Louis. The online courses will be as rigorous as those offered on campus, but will allow students to join from anywhere they have internet access.

SMU is joining Semester Online as a Charter Affiliate Partner, along with Baylor University and Temple University.

See the list of partner schools at the Semester Online site

Provost Paul Ludden said that the agreement with Semester Online will provide valuable flexibility for SMU students, especially for those who need to spend a semester away from the main campus for internships or to manage personal commitments.

“This is an exciting opportunity for our students,” Ludden said. “The live, face-to-face classes will allow the students and the professor to all see each other in real time, enabling both conversations and visual presentations on the same platform.”

> Read more, including a full list of available classes, from SMU News

By | 2013-07-30T09:38:22+00:00 July 30, 2013|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , |

Marc Christensen named dean of Lyle School of Engineering

Marc Christensen

Marc Christensen, SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle Professor of Engineering Innovation, has been named dean of the University’s Lyle School of Engineering, effective immediately. He has served as the school’s interim dean since July 2012.

Marc Christensen, a nationally recognized leader in photonics – the science and technology of light – has been named dean of SMU’s Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering.

Christensen, 41, has served as interim dean in the Lyle School since July 1, 2012, and assumes the new position immediately.

“Dr. Christensen has been setting a strong example of collaborative leadership, innovative research and commitment to students since he began his career at the Lyle School in 2002,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “That he has become dean in little more than a decade is testament to both his achievements and his high expectations for the Lyle School and for himself. He is well-equipped to lead the Lyle School as it continues its rise to prominence.”

“Marc is highly regarded in the Lyle School, across the campus and in the scientific community,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “He is personally immersed in the innovative education style that is the Lyle School’s signature, and has solidified the Lyle School’s academic offerings and research footprint as interim dean. We congratulate him in his new role.“

Christensen will continue as the engineering school’s Bobby B. Lyle Professor of Engineering Innovation and as a research professor in the Department of Physics in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

“I am excited about the opportunity to serve as dean of the Lyle School at this critical juncture,” Christensen said, “and I am proud of the quality of our faculty, the dedication of our staff, and the poise and creativity of our students. SMU-Lyle is making a difference – preparing our students to be innovative leaders, engaging them in our classrooms, our research labs and our community. We will support SMU’s pursuit of excellence in graduate and undergraduate programs while maintaining a strategic focus on the research enterprise, and I look forward to collaborating with the other fine schools across SMU’s campus.”

Christensen received his Bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from Cornell University. He received his Master’s degree in electrical engineering and his Ph.D. in electrical computer engineering at George Mason University. He also is a graduate of the Harvard Institutes for Higher Education Management Development Program.

Christensen is a recognized leader in mapping photonic technology onto varied applications. In 2007, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) identified him as a “rising star in microsystems research” and selected him to be one of the first DARPA Young Faculty Award recipients.

From 1991-1998, while pursuing undergraduate and graduate degrees, Christensen was a staff member and technical leader in BDM’s Sensors and Photonics group (now part of Northrop Grumman Mission Systems). In 1997, he co-founded Applied Photonics, a free-space optical interconnection module company.

Joining SMU in 2002, Christensen served as chair of the Electrical Engineering Department from 2007-12.

In 2008, Christensen was recognized at SMU for outstanding research with the Gerald J. Ford Research Fellowship, and in 2011 he was recognized for outstanding and innovative teaching as a recipient of the Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Award.

Christensen has co-authored more than 100 journal and conference papers. He has two patents in the field of free space optical interconnections, one patent pending in the field of integrated photonics, and four pending in the field of computational imaging.

> Visit SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering online

Bing joins SMU faculty in concurrent appointment with Bush Institute

Eric G. Bing

Eric G. Bing has joined the faculties of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

Global health researcher Eric G. Bing has joined the SMU faculty as professor of global health in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

At SMU, Bing has been named a professor of global health in the Applied Physiology and Wellness Department of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in the Department of Anthropology of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He remains the senior fellow and director of global health at the Bush Institute.

Under the SMU agreement with the Bush Foundation, Bush Institute fellows can receive concurrent academic appointments at SMU following review and approval by the appropriate academic departments.

“Dr. Bing’s faculty appointment represents one of the many benefits of hosting the Bush Presidential Center at SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The Center will bring us access to global experts who will enhance teaching and research at SMU through concurrent appointments with the Bush Institute. These are scholars with whom we otherwise would not have a relationship but who will now have productive interactions and collaborations with existing faculty, as well as students.”

As director of global health at the Bush Institute since 2010, Bing has initiated worldwide health initiatives, including serving as co-leader of the institute’s Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon partnership, an $85 million public-private program designed to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America.

“It would be difficult to exaggerate the value that Dr. Bing brings to SMU,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “In his career he has directed or co-directed five global health research centers and received more than $140 million in grant support. His work in combating the spread of AIDS is a model for future Africa-United States projects.”

Before joining the Bush Institute, Bing was an endowed professor of global health for nearly 20 years at the Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles. He has developed and managed global health programs in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, including HIV prevention, care and treatment programs in Rwanda, Angola, Nigeria, Namibia, Belize and Jamaica. For his efforts he was awarded the Alfred Haynes International Health Leadership Award in 2002, named in 2006 a Paul G. Rogers International Health Research Ambassador from Research! America and named 2010 Professor of the Year at Charles Drew University.

“We are extremely pleased that Dr. Bing has joined the SMU faculty in addition to his work at the Bush Institute,” said James K. Glassman, executive director of the George W. Bush Institute. “It is the latest example of the excellent cooperation between our two institutions.”

“It’s an honor to join the SMU faculty,” said Bing. “Across campus, in every college, there is an abundance of talent and resources, supported by strong leadership at all levels.  SMU is an ideal place to build effective and productive partnerships that not only cross the campus, but the world.”

Bing has published more than 90 articles and abstracts. He received his medical degree from Harvard University School of Medicine, a Master’s of Public Health and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.  His book, Pharmacy on a Bicycle: Innovative Solutions in Global Health and Poverty, is scheduled to be released in May 2013.

Written by Nancy George

> Read more from SMU News

Julie Patterson Forrester named SMU interim law dean

SMU Law Professor Julie Forrester

SMU Law Professor Julie Patterson Forrester has been named interim dean of the University’s Dedman School of Law.

Law Professor Julie Patterson Forrester, an award-winning legal scholar in property law, has been named interim dean of SMU’s Dedman School of Law, effective June 1, 2013. She previously served as the law school’s associate dean of academic affairs, from 1995-96.

“We are fortunate to have Professor Forrester in place to serve in this important role,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden, who appointed the interim dean. “She is an outstanding legal scholar who also has an impressive record of community service and engagement. She will work well with the University community and with the broader legal community as we look forward to a bright future for the Dedman School of Law.”

SMU will conduct a national search for a permanent dean to replace John B. Attanasio, who will complete his service as dean in May. The search committee, also appointed by Ludden, will be assisted by Ilene Nagel, Ph.D., and Mirah Horowitz, J.D., of the executive search firm Russell Reynolds Associates. It will include 18 attorneys, law professors, community leaders and others.

SMU search committee members from the community, who also are members of the Dedman School Executive Board, are attorneys Michael M. Boone of Haynes and Boone, LLP, and chair-elect of the SMU Board of Trustees; William D. Noel of Houston; Alan Feld of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, LLP; the Hon. Deborah G. Hankinson of Hankinson LLP; Albon Head of Jackson Walker, LLP, Fort Worth; and Robert H. Dedman Jr., president and CEO of DFI Management, Ltd., and vice-chair of the SMU Board of Trustees.

Members from the Dedman School of Law community are Professors Cheryl Nelson Butler, Bill Dorsaneo, Xuan-Thao Nguyen, Joshua Tate and Jeffrey Kahn; second-year Dedman School of Law student Jessie Williams Greenwald, Ph.D.; and Karen Sargent, assistant dean for career services. Other committee members are Professor Rita Kirk of the Division of Communication Studies and director of the Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility; Rosario E. Heppe, senior director of corporate compliance at Fluor Corporation; and Wayne Watts, senior executive vice president and general counsel, AT&T.

The committee is chaired by Albert W. Niemi Jr., dean of the SMU Cox School of Business. SMU’s custom is to have a senior dean chair the search committee for other deans.

“We are gratified by the high caliber and diversity of individuals who will serve on our search committee,” Ludden said. “With the advantages of SMU and Dallas and a strong tradition of academic achievement, Dedman School of Law is well-positioned to attract a leader who will take the school into the next stage of its development.”

Professor Forrester joined the faculty at SMU Dedman School of Law in 1990 and teaches in the areas of property, real estate transactions and land use.

She received her B.S.E.E. with highest honors in 1981 and her J.D. with high honors in 1985 from the University of Texas at Austin, where she was a member of the Texas Law Review, Chancellors, and The Order of the Coif. After graduation she was a real estate attorney with the Dallas law firm of Thompson & Knight.

Forrester, co-author of Property Law: Cases, Materials, and Questions (second edition, 2010, with Edward E. Chase), writes and speaks on real estate finance, the residential mortgage market, predatory lending and real property law. She was one of the first legal scholars to write about the problem of predatory lending in the subprime mortgage market, for which she was awarded the John Minor Wisdom Award for Academic Excellence in 1995.

She is a member of the American Law Institute and is on the executive committee of the American Association of Law Schools Real Estate Transactions Section. She recently served on the Texas State Bar Real Estate, Probate, and Trust Law Section committee charged with drafting the new Texas Assignment of Rents Act.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read more from SMU News

SMU joins the Clinton Global Initiative University Network

Clinton Global Initiative University Network logoSMU has joined Ohio State, Tuskegee University, Brown, Cornell and the University of California-Berkeley as one of 23 members of the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) Network – a consortium of colleges and universities that support, mentor and provide seed funding to student innovators and entrepreneurs.

With the approval of SMU Provost Paul Ludden, the University’s Office of Engaged Learning has committed the required $10,000 in funding for SMU students who design and execute an accepted CGI U project in one of five focus areas: Education, Environment and Climate Change, Peace and Human Rights, Poverty Alleviation, and Public Health. The office will manage the budget and allocate the funds.

Successful applicants must submit their project ideas by the organization’s deadline of Jan. 30, 2013. The deadline for completion of each project will be built into its design, possibly ranging from a single academic term to multiple years. Director of Engaged Learning Susan Kress will guide SMU undergraduates through the process.

These project plans, called Commitments to Action, must be “new, specific and measurable initiatives that address social or environmental challenges on campuses, in communities or in different parts of the world,” according to the CGI U website. These commitments have ranged from manufacturing wheelchairs for developing countries to establishing campus bike-share programs, and from creating free vision clinics to mentoring youth through chess.

Through the SMU Engaged Learning initiative, “we’ve identified a few students who are thinking far beyond their years about projects that fit CGI U’s focus areas, and we’ve invited them to apply for funding,” Kress says. She will also work with students to identify faculty experts who can help steer their plans. “Engaged Learning has helped us build some very good relationships with several professors who are willing to work with students” on such projects, she says. Her office will give monthly updates to CGI U on each approved project.

President Bill Clinton launched the Clinton Global Initiative University (cgiu.org) in 2007 to engage the next generation of leaders from college campuses around the world in developing plans and taking action to create positive change. Participants attend CGI U’s annual meeting where students, youth organizations, subject matter experts and thought leaders discuss and develop innovative solutions to global challenges.

CGI U 2013 will be held at Washington University in St. Louis from April 5-7. About 1,200 students from around the world are expected to attend. The opportunity to network with peers and leaders at these meetings is “potentially life-changing for some of these students,” Kress says.

Five SMU students have participated independently in CGI U since its inception.

For more information, contact Meleah Chriss in the Office of Engaged Learning, 214-768-3223.

> Visit SMU’s Office of Engaged Learning online
> Learn more about the Clinton Global Initiative University

$1.5 million gift to fund new endowed chair in Art History

John B. and Marsha Kleinheinz

John B. and Marsha Kleinheinz

A $1.5 million gift from the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education will establish an endowed chair in the Division of Art History in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

“We are deeply grateful to the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for its generosity and visionary support,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “This gift will enable Meadows School of the Arts to add further strength to the faculty and academic offerings in one of the school’s leading departments. The gift supports a major goal of SMU’s Second Century Campaign to endow 100 faculty positions and brings the current total to 86.”

> The Dallas Morning News: Robert Miller: SMU’s Meadows School of Arts receives $1.5 million boost

The Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education is a private charitable foundation supported through contributions from Marsha and John B. Kleinheinz of Fort Worth. Their daughter, Marguerite, graduated from Meadows School of the Arts in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in art history.

“We are very impressed with Marguerite’s experience at the Meadows School and SMU. Meadows Dean José Bowen has made great progress during his tenure,” said Marsha Kleinheinz, president of the Kleinheinz Family Endowment. “We want to support the future of the University that is so important to our family.”

John Kleinheinz, a Stanford University graduate, started his career as an investment banker engaged in corporate finance and mergers and acquisitions for Nomura Securities and Merrill Lynch in Tokyo, New York and London. In 1996 he established Kleinheinz Capital Partners, Inc., a private investment management firm in Fort Worth.

Marsha Kleinheinz earned a B.B.A. degree from SMU in 1983. She is currently involved in several charitable organizations, including Gill Children’s Services, The Warm Place, The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Van Cliburn Foundation, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, Performing Arts of Fort Worth and North Texas Public Broadcasting. The Kleinheinzes have three children.

“Our art history faculty are doing remarkable new things that will change the way art is studied,” said Dean Bowen. “With this exceptionally generous gift, we will be able to recruit and retain outstanding professors and continue to enhance our reputation as one of the very best art history departments in the country.”

SMU Provost Paul Ludden added, “The Kleinheinz Family Endowed Chair in Art History will help to ensure the continued development of the Art History Division as one of SMU’s strongest academic units. It will enhance the entire University as a center of excellence for historical studies.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

SMU J Term 2013 now accepting course proposals

SMU J Term logoSMU’s popular J Term program based at SMU-in-Plano is now accepting course proposals for its January 2013 session. The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012.

J Term instruction is done on an off-load basis and in addition to normal teaching loads for the fall and spring terms. Deans and department chairs must sign course proposal forms and confirm the amount of extra compensation, as stated in an e-mail from SMU Provost Paul Ludden sent Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012.

Established in 2010, the J Term (short for January Term) allows students to complete one three-credit-hour course at a discounted tuition rate before the start of the spring semester. In January 2012, the program served 200 students with 34 course offerings from the Cox School of Business, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Lyle School of Engineering and Meadows School of the Arts.

For more information about J Term, contact Kate Livingston, executive director of Extended Learning, 972-473-3401.

> Learn more from the J Term website at smu.edu/jterm
Complete a J Term 2013 course proposal form (PDF format)
> Visit SMU-in-Plano online at smu.edu/plano

 

By | 2012-08-29T15:21:07+00:00 August 29, 2012|Categories: News, Save the Date|Tags: , , , , , |

Engaged Learning Expo 2012 connects students with opportunities

SMU students who want to learn outside the classroom, tackle real world issues and explore potential careers as part of their university experience will find representatives from DFW-area organizations and agencies who want their help at Monday’s Engaged Learning Expo. The event also will be of interest to faculty who want to develop courses with community components and staff who want to expand opportunities for their programs.

Scheduled for 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Aug. 27, 2012, in the Umphrey Lee Center’s Mack Ballroom, the expo will celebrate 100 SMU undergraduates who worked on significant projects this summer, and provide opportunities to mix and match interested students with 15 different campus programs as well as 45 DFW-area community partners. Refreshments will be served, and participating students will be issued an Engaged Learning “passport” that can be entered into a lottery for prizes.

“A student who engages in a learning activity beyond the classroom has the opportunity to transfer the knowledge and skills of the classroom to a real-life situation, learn from the experience, reflect on it and use it as a basis for further learning,” said Susan Kress, director of Engaged Learning at SMU. “This is a taste of what it means to be a lifelong learner, and, for some, the first step in living a life of meaning and success in a complex world.”

SMU President R. Gerald Turner will speak about SMU’s commitment to community partnerships and Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Ludden will outline the impact of Engaged Learning on the University. Gillian McCombs, dean and director of Central University Libraries, will explain how the Digital Repository: Engaged Learning Collections will house the publications of students who produce Engaged Learning projects.

In addition, James Quick, associate vice president for research and dean of graduate studies, will announce the first recipient of the Excellence in Mentoring Award and introduce SMU’s first director of undergraduate research.

Kimberly Cobb

> Find a list of participating companies and organizations at SMU News

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