Paul Ludden

SMU welcomes its new supercomputer: ManeFrame

ManeFrame with R Gerald Turner, James Quick, Chase Harker, Chase Leinberger and Paul Ludden

At the ManeFrame ceremony were (l. to r.) SMU President R. Gerald Turner; James E. Quick, Dean of Research and Graduate Studies; Chase Harker, finalist in the naming competition; Chase Leinberger, who suggested the winning name; and Paul Ludden, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs.

SMU unveiled its new supercomputer, the ManeFrame, during ceremonies Wednesday, March 19, and award a Dell laptop computer to the student who named it – sophomore Chase Leinberger.

SMU students, faculty and staff selected the name from entries in a contest sponsored by SMU Provost and Vice President Paul Ludden.

With ManeFrame’s addition to its new data center at the southeastern end of campus, the University now has one of the top academic supercomputers in the nation. ManeFrame – named in honor of SMU’s mustang mascot, Peruna – will be opened to the campus in May, expanding the reach of faculty and student research into subjects ranging from particle physics, to human behavior, to water quality and drug discovery.

High-performance computing makes it possible for researchers to study complex problems involving massive amounts of data using sophisticated software and step-by-step recipes for calculations. At its peak, ManeFrame is expected to be capable of more than 120 trillion mathematical operations a second.

“High-performance computing has become an indispensible tool in the 21st century,” said Jim Quick, associate vice president of research and dean of graduate studies. “The incredible computational power provided by high-performance computing is widely used in science, engineering, business and the arts.  ManeFrame brings this capability to Dallas.”

SMU Dean José Bowen named president of Goucher College

Jose Bowen

José Antonio Bowen, dean of SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts for the past eight years, will become president of Goucher College in the Baltimore suburb of Towson, Maryland, on Tuesday, July 1, 2014.

Following a nationwide search, the trustees of Goucher announced on Tuesday, March 12 that Bowen will be their university’s 11th president, succeeding Sanford J. Ungar, who is stepping down. Goucher is a private, coed liberal arts college with approximately 1,500 undergraduates.

“We deeply appreciate the leadership of José Bowen as dean of Meadows School of the Arts at SMU. He has demonstrated outstanding leadership in developing innovative programs to support teaching, advance research and make an arts education an avenue for greater community impact and career opportunities beyond the traditional pathways of success,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “He has worked collaboratively to expand interdisciplinary programs not only within the Meadows School, but also in cooperation with the other six schools of the University. With his broad background and perspectives in the arts, humanities and sciences, he is an ideal choice to lead Goucher College as president.”

Bowen joined the Meadows School as dean in July 2006 after serving as dean of the School of Fine Arts and professor of music at Miami University in Ohio.

Under his leadership, the Meadows School has established the National Center for Arts Research, a first-of-its-kind center that analyzes the largest database of arts research ever assembled and makes its findings available to arts leaders, researchers and the general public; the Meadows Scholars program, which enables Meadows to offer scholarships that attract the most talented and academically successful students in the arts and communications nationwide; and the Meadows Prize, an arts residency awarded to up to two pioneering artists and scholars each year who are active in a discipline represented by one of the academic units within the Meadows School.

The school also has recruited top international faculty – such as former Yale School of Drama dean Stan Wojewodski as chair of theatre; Metropolitan Opera star Clifton Forbis as director of voice; and award-winning Artists-in-Residence Will Power (theatre) and Matt Albert (chamber music). The Meadows School has launched under Bowen’s leadership new curriculum in emerging fields such as arts entrepreneurship, art and urbanism, fashion media and creative computation, as well as a new Ph.D. in art history.

“It is no surprise that Jose Bowen’s creative, academic and administrative achievements have moved him into the top ranks of educational leadership,” said Paul Ludden, provost and vice president for academic affairs. “He has strengthened important relationships with funding organizations, individual donors, and new community partners. He has become a national figure in the conversation about teaching methodologies and faculty-student interactions. He leaves us well positioned to attract another outstanding dean. We will miss Jose and his wife, Kimberly, but wish them the best of success at Goucher College.”

> Read more from SMU News

‘Year of the Faculty’ website goes live

SMU's Year of the Faculty websiteSMU’s 2014 Year of the Faculty celebration kicks into gear with the launch of a new website honoring faculty achievement and recognition.

The site’s central feature is an archive of memories from SMU alumni and students. More than 300 remembrances of favorite faculty members have already been sent in, and the University is spreading the word through news and social media.

Throughout the year, the website will also highlight the achievements of individual faculty members from many different disciplines. Faculty profiles will include endowed chairs and noted experts, as well as award-winning teachers, scholars and researchers.

In addition, the Year of the Faculty theme will be part of several public celebrations throughout the calendar year, beginning with 2014 Founders’ Day Weekend April 10-13 – which launches with a historic Centennial Salute to the faculty at the annual President’s Briefing.

The Year of the Faculty is part of the University’s ongoing centennial celebration and will be a central theme of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign. The celebration was first announced by SMU Provost Paul Ludden during the 2014 Spring General Faculty Meeting Wednesday, Jan. 22.

> Visit SMU’s Year of the Faculty homepage

Jennifer M. Collins named new SMU law dean

SMU’s new law dean is a scholar at the intersection of criminal and family law whose background includes extensive academic administration experience as well as service as a federal prosecutor. Jennifer M. Collins will begin her duties as the Judge James Noel Dean of Dedman School of Law on Tuesday, July 1, 2014,

Collins comes to SMU from Wake Forest University, where she currently serves as vice provost. Collins has been on the law school faculty at Wake Forest since 2003 and was named associate provost in 2010 and vice provost in September 2013. She has continued to teach courses on gender and the law and legal professionalism while serving in the provost’s office.

“We are delighted to welcome Jennifer Collins to SMU and Dallas,” said Paul Ludden, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs. “She is a brilliant legal scholar and an outstanding academic administrator. Her experience as associate provost at Wake Forest has provided her with a campus-wide perspective that will be invaluable in leading Dedman School of Law at SMU.”

“The Dedman School of Law can be proud of the reputation it has built for academic rigor, as well as its excellent record in preparing students to practice in prestigious law firms,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Because Jennifer Collins’ career spans a lengthy tenure as a federal prosecutor as well as serving in academia, she is uniquely positioned to continue the Dedman School of Law tradition of preparing men and women to enter a competitive legal market.”

Collins graduated magna cum laude with a J.D. from Harvard University in 1991, and received her B.A. in history, cum laude with Distinction in the Major, from Yale University in 1987.

“I am absolutely delighted to be joining the SMU community,” Collins said. “I loved having the opportunity to meet with terrific, dedicated faculty and staff, and truly outstanding students, during my visit to campus, and I am eager to work together to address the challenges currently facing legal education. I cannot imagine an institution better positioned to respond to those challenges than the Dedman School of Law, and it is a great privilege to become part of the SMU family.”

Collins clerked for the Hon. Dorothy W. Nelson in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit after graduating from Harvard Law School, and worked briefly in private practice in Washington, D.C., before joining the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Legal Counsel as an attorney-adviser in 1993. Collins served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia from 1994 to 2002, working in the homicide section for the last six of those years and prosecuting more than 30 jury trials.

She returned briefly to private practice in 2002 and joined the faculty of Wake Forest University School of Law in 2003. While at Wake Forest, Collins has taught criminal law, criminal procedure, family law, and gender and the law. She is the 2009 winner of the Jurist Excellence in Teaching Award, selected by the graduating class of the law school, and the 2010 recipient of the Joseph Branch Excellence in Teaching Award, selected by the dean of the law school.

Collins became associate provost for academic and strategic initiatives at Wake Forest in 2010, where she spearheaded the university’s entry into the online and distance education market and developed new initiatives to increase diversity and inclusion across campus. She promoted efforts to examine the relevance and value of a liberal arts education and coordinated a large-scale strategic planning effort to improve campus culture for Wake Forest students.

Collins’ legal research has focused on issues involving families and the criminal justice system, including the prosecution of parents who are responsible for their children’s deaths. She is the author, with Dan Markel and Ethan Lieb, of Privilege or Punish? Criminal Justice and The Challenge of Family Ties, published by Oxford University Press in 2009, and has written many other law review articles and essays.

Provost Ludden expressed thanks to Julie Forrester, an award-winning scholar in property law, who has served since June 1 as Dean ad interim for Dedman School of Law. “Professor Forrester provided a great service to Dedman Law, providing outstanding leadership and laying the groundwork for a smooth transition,” Ludden said.

Collins, who was selected after a nationwide search, succeeds John Attanasio, who served as dean for three terms, from 1998 to 2013.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read the full story from SMU News

Provost Ludden asks students to name SMU’s new supercomputer

The December 2013 arrival of a new supercomputer at SMU expands the University’s high-performance computing capacity to weigh in among the top academic computers in the United States.

SMU's supercomputer, delivered in December 2013“High-performance computing is a transformative technology that impacts many fields across the intellectual landscape, including physics and finance, chemistry and computing, engineering and economics, digital art, computer gaming, biology, data science, and many more fields,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden in a letter e-mailed to students.

“We are calling for SMU students to submit recommendations for a name for SMU’s powerful new computing equipment,” Ludden wrote.

The new supercomputer was known by the name “MANA” at its previous home at the Maui High-Performance Computing Center, one of the five U.S. Department of Defense Supercomputing Resource Centers, said Professor of Mathematics Thomas Hagstrom, director of SMU’s Center for Scientific Computation.

“When installed in Maui its throughput capacity was 103 teraflops, which ranked among the top 500 fastest supercomputers in the world. That is 103 trillion arithmetic operations per second,” Hagstrom said.

Joe Gargiulo, SMU chief information officer, anticipates that “the peak theoretical performance of MANA combined with SMU’s current system would exceed 120 teraflops.” MANA is being installed at SMU’s new data center.

The top 5 entries in the naming contest will each receive an iPad mini, and the winning name will be selected via e-mail vote by SMU faculty, staff and students, Ludden said. The first-place entry will be announced at the dedication of the new supercomputer, and the winning student will receive a new laptop.

The 5 finalists will be selected by an SMU panel consisting of Jim Quick, associate vice president for research and dean of graduate studies; Patty Alvey, director of assessment and accreditation and Richards Creative Professor of Advertising; Rick Briesch, associate professor of marketing; Hagstrom; Jingbo Ye, professor of physics; Ramon Trespalacios, student body president; and Katherine Ladner, student body secretary.

Renovated Moody Coliseum, Miller Event Center to open for 2013 December Commencement Convocation

SECOND UPDATE Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, 4:28 p.m.: All extra complimentary faculty/staff tickets for the SMU-UConn Moody Coliseum opener have been distributed. No additional complimentary tickets will be available for this game. A limited number of tickets are available for sale. Please contact the SMU Ticket Office at 214-SMU-GAME or visit SMUMustangs.com to purchase tickets.

Moody Coliseum rendering

An artist’s rendering of a new concourse area in SMU’s Moody Coliseum. The freshly renovated venue will reopen for the University’s 2013 December Commencement Convocation on Saturday, Dec. 21.

With the snip of a red ribbon, SMU’s expanded and renovated Moody Coliseum and new Miller Event Center will  open at the University’s 2013 December Commencement Convocation Saturday, Dec. 21.

The 167,000-square-foot complex and Dallas landmark is home to Mustang men’s and women’s basketball, women’s volleyball and SMU academic ceremonies, as well as numerous community events such as concerts, cultural programs and high school graduations. The renovation and expansion features new seating, entertainment areas, court improvements and infrastructure, yet retains the ambiance that has made Moody a favorite venue for more than 50 years.

> Read more about the history of “Moody Magic”

“With this renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and the addition of the new Miller Event Center, SMU will be home to one of the finest collegiate arenas and events centers in the country,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We are thankful to the Moody Foundation and David and Carolyn Miller and others for their support of this facility, which will benefit the entire North Texas area.”

SMU Provost Paul Ludden said that it was appropriate that the first event to be held in the facility will be the University’s December Commencement Convocation ceremony. “Our graduates and their families and friends will help us usher in a new era in this remarkable facility.”

A $20 million gift from the Moody Foundation in 2011 provided the impetus for the extensive expansion and renovation. SMU and the Moody Foundation have enjoyed a long partnership, beginning with a 1965 gift in support of the SMU Coliseum on campus that, in acknowledgement, was renamed Moody Coliseum.  Since that time, the foundation also has supported improvements to Fondren Science Building.

> Visit the New Moody online at newmoody.com

Alumnus and trustee David Miller ’72, ’73 and his wife, Carolyn, also committed $10 million toward the renovation project in 2011. The Miller Event Center, an addition on the north side of Moody Coliseum, named in their honor, includes the Miller Champions Club – a 5,000-square-foot furnished entertainment area on the concourse level – and suites with courtside views, along with administrative areas to support student-athletes and coaches.

The Miller Champions Club is named in honor of David Miller by contributions of several friends, including leadership commitments from Gina and Tucker Bridwell and Belle and Don Berg. Early funding of a feasibility study and conceptual design for this significant construction project was provided by Sylvie and Gary Crum.

All faculty and staff tickets for the opening basketball games on Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014 have been claimed. A limited number of tickets are available for purchase at the SMU Athletics Ticket Office. To help meet the demand, SMU Athletics will also release any unclaimed student tickets to faculty and staff members on Thursday, Jan. 2 after the student ticket pick-up window closes.

Faculty and staff tickets are still available for games on Wednesday, Jan. 15 and Tuesday, Jan. 21.

The renovation celebration at a glance:

Artist's rendering of the new floor in SMU's renovated Moody Coliseum

Artist’s rendering of the new floor in SMU’s renovated Moody Coliseum. Basketball returns to Moody Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014.

  • Friday, December 6, individual game tickets on sale
  • Tuesday, Dec. 17, Leadership Donor Celebration (by invitation)
  • Wednesday, Dec. 18, 7-9 a.m. Basketball Season Ticket Holders’ Preview
  • Saturday, Dec. 21December Commencement Convocation and Building Dedication Ceremony
  • January 4, inaugural athletic events:
    • Men’s Basketball:
    SMU Mustangs vs. University of Connecticut Huskies
    • Women’s Basketball:
    SMU Mustangs vs. University of South Florida Bulls

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story at SMU News

Campus celebrates Veterans Day 2013

SMU Veterans pinVeterans Day 2013 is Monday, Nov. 11, and SMU will honor its military vets in many ways this week:

• SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility will present SMU Veteran lapel pins to all University vets – students, faculty and staff – to recognize their service and identify their membership with the University’s veteran community. The Maguire Center will present pins 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11 at the Main Quad flagpole. In addition, Ruthie’s Rolling Café will offer free sandwiches to vets wearing their pins.

• The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum will offer free admission to all veterans, retirees, active duty, National Guard, Reserve, and Coast Guard service members on Veterans Day. The Museum is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Veterans Day 2013; the offer is good for all tickets sold at the admissions desk that day, but not applicable to tickets sold online. Any service member participating in the free admission offer will be asked to show a form of identification upon purchasing their tickets. For more information, e-mail bush43media@nara.gov.

• The Office of the Provost hosts a luncheon honoring veterans 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center. The keynote speaker is U.S. Army Col. Miguel Howe (Ret.), director of the Military Service Initiative in the George W. Bush Presidential Center. Special presentations will also be made by:

  • SMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Ludden
  • University Chief Information Officer Joe Gargiulo (U.S. Navy 1975-77, U.S. Navy Reserve 1978-80)
  • SMU Chief of Police Richard Shafer (U.S. Air Force 1973-94)
  • SMU Color Guard
  • Associate Vice President for Campus Services Julie Wiksten ’78, ’92
  • Brandon Montgomery ’14, president, U.S. Military Veterans of SMU (U.S. Marine Corps 2005-10)
  • Blake Helm ’14 (M.B.A.), vice president, Cox Veterans in Business (U.S. Army, 2005-12)

• In addition, the Office of the Provost and SMU Military Veterans are collecting holiday toys and care package items during the luncheon. Please bring a new unwrapped toy for the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s Toys For Tots program and personal items for active-duty U.S. military service members. Visit the United Service Organizations (USO) website for a list of suggested care package items.

• SMU’s Central University Libraries invite you to view one of DeGolyer Library’s finest collections in digitized form: the Melvin C. Shaffer World War II Photographs. Shaffer’s evocative images depict the indigenous populations and local conditions of North Africa, Italy, Southern France, and Germany from 1943 to 1945. Included are 19 images of Mount Vesuvius that depict the volcano before, during and after its eruption in 1944.

SMU Dean William Tsutsui named president of Hendrix College

William TsutsuiAfter a nationwide search for the new president of Hendrix College, the trustees of that institution have identified Dedman College Dean Bill Tsutsui for the position. He has accepted the offer and will leave SMU May 31, 2014, to assume the presidency. His wife, Marjorie Swann, will hold a tenured faculty position at Hendrix, which is located in Conway, Arkansas.

“We deeply appreciate the leadership of Bill Tsutsui during the past three years,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “During that time he has worked collaboratively to lead significant and rapid progress in developing innovative programs, establishing new endowed chairs and advancing research. It is not surprising that Dean Tsutsui would be tapped for a college presidency as the next step in his distinguished career as an administrator and educator. We wish him the best of luck.”

Dean Tsutsui has been a strong advocate in cultivating support for Dedman College, working closely with the Dedman College Committee of The Second Century Campaign and the Dedman College Executive Board. Dedman’s relationships with these leaders will remain intact as a major asset in attracting a new dean for the College.

Recent innovations such as establishment of the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute, the strength of current programs such as the Tower Center for Political Studies, significant research achievements and the College’s tradition of strong teaching will continue to serve as the foundation of Dedman’s ongoing progress.

“While we will miss Bill, who became a friend to all of us during his time here, his accomplishments and leadership leave us well-positioned to maintain SMU’s rising quality and to attract an outstanding new dean,” said Paul Ludden, provost and vice president for academic affairs. “The success of The Second Century Campaign has brought national recognition and prominence to SMU and Dedman that will serve as a strong foundation for new leadership.”

After May 31, Associate Dean Peter Moore will serve as interim dean of the College. “His past experience in this role and his continuing leadership within Dedman ensure that progress will continue in a seamless fashion,” Ludden continued. A search committee will be chaired by Perkins Dean William Lawrence, and its membership will be named in the next few weeks.

Provost announces names of 11 SMU Faculty in Residence

SMU's southeast campus residential complex

Artist’s rendering of SMU’s southeast campus residential complex, which will help support the University’s Residential Commons experience.

SMU Provost Paul Ludden has announced the appointment of eight new Faculty in Residence (FiRs) selected in the Spring 2013 semester. The new FiRs join the three “founding FiRs” as the first full cohort to become part of the University’s new Residential Commons (RC).

Faculty in Residence are chosen in a competitive selection process. When the Commons program launches in Fall 2014, each FiR will live in a residence hall and work with student leaders and Student Affairs staff to shape the Residential Commons experience.

> SMU Forum: Three SMU professors named first Faculty in Residence

Four FiRs have moved into residence halls a year early as part of the Residential Commons transition process: Ann Batenburg, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development; Mark Fontenot, Computer Science and Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; Robert Krout, Music Therapy, Meadows School of the Arts; and Charles Wuest, English, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

The full list of faculty members who have been appointed for a 3-4 year term, and the halls where they will take up residence:

  • Ann Batenburg, Teaching and Learning – Virginia-Snider RC *
  • Martin Camp, School of Law – Residential Commons 4 (under construction)
  • Miroslava Detcheva, Spanish – McElvaney RC
  • Mark Fontenot, Computer Science and Engineering – Loyd RC (under construction) *†
  • Mark Kerins, Film and Media Arts – Morrison-McGinnis RC
  • Rita Kirk, Communication Studies – Armstrong RC (under construction)
  • Robert Krout, Music Therapy – Mary Hay/Peyton/Shuttles RC *†
  • Will Power, Theatre – Residential Commons 1 (under construction)
  • David Son, Chemistry – Boaz RC
  • Tom Tunks, Music – Residential Commons 3 (under construction) *†
  • Elizabeth Wheaton, Economics – Cockrell-McIntosh RC

* Living in residence during the 2013-14 academic year
† One of SMU’s three original Faculty in Residence, the “Founding FiRs

Along with the 11 FiRs, 23 Faculty Affiliates were selected and have been working in every residence hall on campus since the beginning of the year. For more information on participating in the Faculty Affiliate program, contact Jeff Grim, Residence Life and Student Housing.

> Learn more at the SMU Residential Commons website: smu.edu/residentialcommons

National expert to lead broad cybersecurity initiative at SMU

Fred ChangFrederick R. Chang, a recognized national expert in cyber security, has joined SMU to develop a multidisciplinary program aimed at tackling the most pressing cyber challenges facing individuals, business and government today.

Chang, whose career includes leadership positions in academia, business, and in government at the National Security Agency, is the new Bobby B. Lyle Endowed Centennial Distinguished Chair in Cyber Security. The position is made possible by a financial commitment from SMU trustee and longtime benefactor Bobby B. Lyle, for whom SMU’s engineering school is named.

> More about Fred Chang from SMU News

SMU’s first Centennial Distinguished Chair provides a faculty position endowed at $2.5 million, plus start-up funding of $1 million for the first five years to provide immediate support for the position and related research. The establishment of a Centennial endowment is available only to donors during the SMU Centennial commemoration, March 1, 2011, through Dec. 31, 2015.

In addition to holding the Lyle Chair, Chang also will be a professor of computer science in the Lyle School of Engineering and a senior fellow in the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. His appointments to positions in both the Lyle School and Dedman College reflect the interdisciplinary approach he believes is key to effective cyber research.

“Economic and national security are bedrock issues for our country,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Dr. Chang is prepared to take advantage of the University’s commitment to education, research and dialogue to deal with these critical issues, and will bring to the table students and faculty in all disciplines to find solutions. We are delighted to welcome him to SMU, where our students fully expect to be world changers.”

Network World: Cybercrime service automates creation of fake IDs, other verification documents

Chang has aggressive objectives to:

  • Conduct broad programs of research aimed both at creating a science of cyber security and addressing national cyber security priorities.
  • Apply an interdisciplinary approach to challenging problems, incorporating elements from disciplines not traditionally associated with cyber security such as law, business and the social sciences.
  • Help close the skills gap in cyber security by educating and tapping the innovation capabilities of SMU students to meet the demand for trained cyber professionals.

“Professor Chang arrives at SMU Lyle at an important moment,” said Lyle School Dean Marc Christensen. “The impact of cyber crime and cyber terrorism cannot be overstated. As Professor Chang joins SMU Lyle to lead our already strong cyber security researchers, he is poised to make a notable difference in this arena. We will be educating a generation of SMU graduates who understand the complexities of cyber-related issues whether their degree is in computer science or philosophy.  These students will be better suited to live, work, and play in the modern interconnected world.”

Chang served as the director of research at the National Security Agency (NSA) in 2005-06, where he was awarded the NSA Director’s Distinguished Service Medal. In addition, he has held several senior executive positions at SBC Communications, prestigious positions at both the University Texas at Austin and the University of Texas at San Antonio, and was most recently president and chief operating officer of 21CT Inc., an advanced intelligence analytics solutions company in Austin.

Learn more about Dr. Chang’s CV

“Dr. Chang’s experience at the highest levels of government, industry, and academia has given him a unique perspective on the cyber security landscape,” said Paul Ludden, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs. “He has influenced the national dialogue and policies on cyber security through his work at the NSA, his testimony before congressional committees, and his presence on academic and industrial advisory boards as well as his peer journal editorial board work. He will continue that influence at SMU.”

“It is an honor and a privilege for me to have the opportunity to join SMU at this crucial time in the evolution of cyber security,” Chang said. “From the Lyle School of Engineering, to the Tower Center for Political Studies and across campus, I feel a tremendous sense of chemistry and collegiality here. There is also a sense of urgency, purpose and mission that is especially appealing. To be part of this is tremendously exciting to me.”

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read more of this story from SMU News

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