Pamela Patton wins 2014 Eleanor Tufts Book Award

Pamela Patton

Pamela Patton wins 2014 Eleanor Tufts Book Award

Pamela Patton, Chair, Division of Art History, SMU Meadows School of the ArtsPamela Patton, associate professor and chair of art history SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, has won the 2014 Eleanor Tufts Book Award from the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies. Her 2013 book, Art of Estrangement: Redefining Jews in Reconquest Spain, was the unanimous choice for the national honor.

The Tufts Award was established in memory of noted Spanish art expert Eleanor Tufts, who taught at SMU from 1974 until her passing in 1991. The award honors a distinguished book, written in English, on the history of art or architecture in Iberia.

Book cover, 'Art of Estrangement: Redefining Jews in Reconquest Spain' by Pamela PattonThe judging committee wrote, “Patton’s engaging text examines the varied meanings of representations of Jews in the visual culture of the Reconquista. Original in its conception and compelling in its arguments, this book traces the ways in which the image of Spain’s Jews as ‘the other’ was transfigured by the cultural, political and religious agendas of its Christian rulers.… This publication met and surpassed the stipulated award criteria of ‘originality of conception, thoroughness of research, rigor of argument, brilliance of insight, significance of findings, and clarity of expression.’

“In sum, the book’s broad scope of inquiry and sophisticated interdisciplinary approach that draws on history, religion, and cultural studies make a significant and original contribution to the study of medieval Spanish art and Iberian studies as a whole. Its lucid and elegant prose made it a pleasure to read.”

Patton said she was greatly honored by the award, especially because she has a personal connection to Eleanor Tufts. “Just before she passed away, she was part of the committee that brought me to SMU as a Haakon Pre-Doctoral Fellow,” said Patton. “When I was subsequently hired as faculty, I took on several of her courses. So it’s a lovely bit of karma for me.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

March 7, 2014|For the Record, News, Year of the Faculty|

Four professors honored at Spring 2011 General Faculty Meeting

SMU Provost Paul Ludden opened the 2011 Spring Faculty Meeting by presenting awards to four outstanding faculty members.

Assistant Professor of Art History Amy Buono and Assistant Professor of Sociology Sheri Kunovich received 2009-10 Golden Mustang Faculty Awards. The Golden Mustang honors junior faculty members who sustain high achievement as both teachers and scholars.

The 2009-10 President’s Associates Outstanding Faculty Awards were presented to Associate Professor of Philosophy Robert Howell and Associate Professor of Art History Pamela Patton. The awards honor tenured faculty who have sustained high achievement as both teachers and scholars in their professions.

Ludden announced SMU’s latest Carnegie Foundation research classification and unveiled the University’s new Quality Enhancement Plan at the Jan. 19 meeting. He also provided updates on the 10-year accreditation review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), next year’s budget standings and a proposed new structure for undergraduate admissions.

Read more under the link below.

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January 26, 2011|News|

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 2, 2010

David Cotterrell, 'Casualties Arriving at Bastion by Chinook,' 2007Art and war: British artist David Cotterrell will speak in this week’s Visiting Artist Lecture at the Meadows School of the Arts. Cotterrell, a professor of art at Sheffield Hallam University in England, will talk about the usage of war and medicine in art and public practices. Cotterrell received a War Artist Commission from The Wellcome Trust in 2007, and he also spent one month living with a British Army Joint Forces Medical Group in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. The event is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 3, in Room 3527, Greer Garson Theatre (the 3rd floor screening room). For more information, call 214-768-2489. (Right, Casualties arriving at Bastion by Chinook, taken in 2007 by David Cotterrell.)

The medieval life: Associate Professor of Art History Pamela Patton will discuss one of the most influential cultural clashes of the medieval era in a Meadows Museum-sponsored lecture, “Living with Others in Medieval Spain: ‘Conviviencia’ and Its Afterlife.” The lecture covers how the congregation of Muslims, Christians, and Jews affected art, architecture and literature from the medieval period to the early modern times, and how the culture shock still remains relevant today. The event will begin at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4, in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. For more information, call 214-768-4677.

Patient’s rights discussed: George Annas of Boston University School of Health will discuss the legal and ethical implications of the death-penalty doctoral team in the Embrey Human Rights Program’s ongoing Death Penalty Matters Series. Annas, the William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Law, Bioethics and Human Rights at Boston (and a professor at the BU School of Medicine and School of Law to boot), has been writing a regular feature since 1991 on “Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights” for the New England Journal of Medicine. The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. For more information, contact Sherry Aikman, 214-768-8347.

Humanity and media collide: The Perkins School’s Center for the Study of Latino/a Christianity and Religions tackles a tough subject in their upcoming Interdisciplinary Dialogue Event, “Latinos, Religion, and the Media.” Moderators Anthony Cortese, professor of sociology, and Maria Dixon, associate professor of corporate communication and public affairs, investigate and discuss how the media portrays religion with concern to Latino cultures and connections. On what ethical level can we talk about Latino immigration and Latino heritage and religion at the same time? Are illegal or legal immigrants Christian? Are we a Christian nation? Can churches provide sanctuary to undocumented workers? These tough questions and more are covered in a 7 p.m. audience discussion Monday, Nov. 8 in Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. Admission is free, but RSVPs are required. For more information, call 214-768-8436.

November 2, 2010|Calendar Highlights, Save the Date|

Calendar Highlights: April 20, 2010

Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Clements Center Fellow Raúl Coronado will give a lecture entitled “‘We have been made the victims’: The Melancholia of Broken Social Contract and Spanish-American Independence” at noon April 21 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Sponsored by SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies. Bring your lunch.

Still image from 'Papers'“Papers,” please: A new film explores the stories of the approximately 2 million undocumented children born outside the United States and raised in this country, and the challenges they face as they turn 18 without legal status and with no path to citizenship. “Papers” will be shown at SMU at 7 p.m. April 25 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. A discussion will follow. The event is free; donations are welcome. Presented by Texas State Representative Rafael Anchia and the LULAC Student Chapter at SMU. For more information, contact SMU LULAC President Elizabeth Zamora, 972-762-1964.

Perkins Interdisciplinary Dialogue: A panel of SMU experts and others explore “Crypto Judaism in the American Southwest: Hidden Religious Roots of Hispanic Peoples” in a public workshop at 2:30 p.m. April 25 in the Great Hall, Room 121, Perkins Prothro Hall. Participants include David Maldonado Jr. and Gregory Cuellar, Perkins School of Theology; Pamela Patton, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts; Stanley M. Hordes, Latin American and Iberian Institute, University of New Mexico; and Juan Gutierrez, a doctoral candidate in the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies, Chicago. A reception will follow. Presented by the Perkins School’s Center for the Study of Latino/a Christianity and Religions with funds from the Luce Foundation. Cosponsored by Perkins School of Theology, the Perkins Mexican American Program, the Clements Center for Southwest Studies and the Department of Religious Studies in SMU’s Dedman College, and the SMU Judaic Studies Program. For more information, contact Stephanie Carroll, 214-768-3477.

Library of Congress Jefferson CollectionA presidential collection: In 1815, Congress purchased Thomas Jefferson’s personal library – then the largest private book collection available in North America – to replace the congressional library destroyed when the British burned the U.S. Capitol the previous year. Jefferson’s collection (right) served as the core of the Library of Congress until catastrophic fire again struck the Capitol on Christmas Eve 1851, destroying two-thirds of his original collection. Mark Dimunation, chief of the Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress, discusses the reconstruction of this landmark collection and the fresh insight it provides into the mind of Thomas Jefferson and the world of the Enlightenment in “Forged in Fire: The Jefferson Collection at the Library of CongressApril 29 in the Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. Reception at 6:30 p.m., lecture at 7 p.m. Sponsored by SMU’s Bridwell Library, DeGolyer Library, Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon, and the Book Club of Texas. RSVP online or call 214-768-3483. (This event was rescheduled from Feb. 11.)

April 20, 2010|Calendar Highlights|
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