Co-founders of the Campaign to Fix the Debt, Erskine Bowles <br />and Alan Simpson, deliver final Tate Lecture of 2013

Omni Hotels Lecture

Co-founders of the Campaign to Fix the Debt, Erskine Bowles
and Alan Simpson, deliver final Tate Lecture of 2013

Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson, co-founders of the Campaign to Fix the Debt, will be at SMU Tuesday, Dec. 3 to deliver the final lecture of the Tate Distinguished Lecture Series for 2013. They will give the Omni Hotels Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

BowlesErskine Bowles started his career in financial services. He worked for numerous venture and private equity firms and even founded the firm, Bowles, Hollowell and Conner. In 1991, he joined the administration of President Bill Clinton as Administrator of the Small Business Administration and went on to serve as Clinton’s Deputy Chief of Staff and later as White House Chief of Staff from 1997-98. Bowles is credited with negotiating the first balanced budget in a generation during his time at the White House.

Follow Bowles & Simpson on Twitter

SimpsonAlan Simpson comes from a legacy of law; after his honorable discharge from the Army in 1956 he practiced law for 18 years at his father’s firm, Simpson, Kepler and Simpson. He went on to serve as City Attorney of Cody, Wyoming for 10 years and in 1964 he was elected state representative for his native Park County in the Wyoming State Legislature. Simpson continued his political career and served three terms in the United States Senate from 1978-97.

In 2010 Barack Obama asked Bowles and Simpson to co-chair the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform. The bipartisan commission produced a plan to reduce the Nation’s deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade. The two men then co-founded the Campaign to Fix the Debt, a non-partisan movement to put America on a better fiscal and economic path. Bowles and Simpson will be speaking of this current project at Tuesday’s Tate.

Learn more about the Campaign to Fix the Debt

Bowles graduated from UNC and received his M.B.A. degree from Columbia University. He is noted for coordinating the federal response to the Oklahoma City bombing and in 2004  joined the United National Deputy Special Envoy to coordinate the global response to the Indian Ocean tsunami. He is married and has three children and nine grandchildren. Two of his sons dealt with juvenile diabetes, leading to Bowles’ involvement in the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, including service as its national president.

Simpson received his bachelor’s and J.D. degrees from the University of Wyoming. Before accepting his current position, he was a visiting lecturer and taught a class part-time with his brother at the University of Wyoming. He wrote the book Right in the Old Gazoo: A Lifetime of Scrapping with the Press and is the subject of a biography entitled Shooting from the Lip. He is married and has three children and six grandchildren.

Tuesday’s evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available; meet in the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m.

Bowles and Simpson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

To ask the men a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @BowlesSimpson and the hashtag #SMUtate.

The Tate Distinguished Lecture Series will return in 2014 with Khaled Hosseini on Tuesday, Feb. 11.

December 3, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Economic historian Niall Ferguson delivers Tate Lecture March 19

Historian, writer, broadcaster and professor Niall Ferguson is at SMU Tuesday, March 19 for the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Omni Hotels Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Niall FergusonFerguson’s historical financial and economical knowledge has been showcased on many platforms. He has written 12 books, and several of them have won awards. His first, Paper and Iron: Hamburg Business and German Politics in the Era of Inflation 1897-1927was short-listed for the History Today Book of the Year award, and The World’s Banker: The History of the House of Rothschild received international critical acclaim and won the Wadsworth Prize for Business History.

Ferguson’s book The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World was made into a four-part television series and won the 2009 International Emmy Award for best documentary. The series was produced by Chimerica Media, Ferguson’s own TV production company started in 2007 with Melanie Fall and Adrian Pennink. Chimerica Media has also produced Civilization and Kissinger, a full-length documentary about former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, both of which ran on Channel 4 in the United Kingdom.

>  Follow Niall Ferguson on Twitter @nfergus

In 2004, Time Magazine named Ferguson one of the 100 most influential people in the world.  He is a weekly columnist for Newsweek, contributing editor for Bloomberg TV and adviser to the architects Foster & Partners, the hedge fund GLG Partners and merchant bank Kleinwort Benson.

Ferguson graduated with an honors degree in history from the University of Oxford and received a doctor of philosophy from Magdalen College. He currently divides his time between the United States and the United Kingdom. He is the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University & William Ziegler Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Ferguson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 19 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Ferguson a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @nfergus and the hashtag #SMUtate. Student moderator Amie Kromis will ask some of these questions during the event.

> Visit the SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage at smu.edu/tateseries

March 18, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Moneyball author Michael Lewis to give 2012 Tate Lecture Jan. 24

Michael Lewis, author of 'Moneyball,' 'The Blind Side' and 'Boomerang'Financial journalist and best-selling author Michael Lewis – whose books became the Oscar-nominated films Moneyball and The Blind Side – visits the Hilltop Tuesday, Jan. 24, to deliver the Omni Hotels Lecture in SMU’s 2011-12 Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. The event begins at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

All tickets to the previously scheduled Meg Whitman Tate Lecture from Oct. 18, 2011, will be honored at the Michael Lewis lecture.

Lewis is a regular contributor to The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Slate and Bloomberg. His latest book, Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World (2011), is based on articles he wrote for Vanity Fair on the debt crisis in Greece, Iceland and Germany. It captures the financial madness on both sides of the Atlantic during the past decade as individuals, institutions and entire nations embraced instant gratification over long-term planning. The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine (2010) analyzes the freefall of the U.S. economy and the heroes and villains that drove it overboard.

As an author, Lewis first made a name for himself in 1989 with Liar’s Poker: Rising Through the Wreckage of Wall Street, an inside look at his career as a bond trader. Author Tom Wolfe called it “the funniest book on Wall Street I’ve ever read,” and the book also earned Lewis the label of “America’s poet laureate of capital” from The Los Angeles TimesLiar’s Poker spent 62 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

Lewis also examined the 1980s’ get-rich-quick jungle in The Money Culture (1992), chronicled the 1996 presidential campaign in Losers: The Road to Everyplace but the White House, and explored the internet boom in Next: The Future Just Happened (2002).

His 2003 bestseller, Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, examined the effect an innovative personnel approach has had in allowing the small-budget Oakland Athletics to consistently rank among baseball’s best teams. Moneyball became a major motion picture in 2011 starring Brad Pitt and holds the record for the largest opening weekend for a baseball movie ever. (On the morning of Lewis’ Tate Lecture, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced that the film had been nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture.)

In 2006, Lewis wrote The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game, which tells the true story of Baltimore Ravens offensive tackle Michael Oher. The 2009 film adaptation – starring Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw and Kathy Bates (’69) – broke the box office record for the biggest opening weekend of a sports film in history. It was also nominated for Best Picture and won Bullock a Best Actress trophy in the Academy Awards. His 2009 book, Home Game: An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood, is a compilation of stories he wrote for his column “Dad Again” in Slate, detailing the parenting realities he encountered with the births of his children.

A native of New Orleans, Lewis graduated from Princeton University with a degree in art history and earned his Master’s at The London School of Economics. Before he began his writing career, he worked with The Salomon Brothers on Wall Street and in London. He lives in Berkeley with his wife, former MTV News correspondent Tabitha Soren, and their three children.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Lewis will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 24 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The event is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

January 24, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|
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