SMU Digital Repository ready for faculty submissions

SMU Digital Repository ready for faculty submissions

SMU Digital Repository logoSMU’s Central University Libraries, Office of Research and Graduate Studies, and Office of Information Technology have combined resources to create the SMU Digital Repository, an online archive for collecting and sharing the scholarly work of SMU faculty, staff and students.

The repository is the product of a strategic partnership headed by CUL Dean and Director Gillian McCombs, Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies Jim Quick, and Chief Information Officer Joe Gargiulo.

Using the Digital Commons software platform created by Berkeley Electronic Press, the SMU Digital Repository provides open access to research documents, articles, preprints, working papers, conference agendas and papers, and scholarly image collections created by SMU faculty, students, and academic staff.

The Digital Commons software also allows the publishing of open-access or subscription-based journals, and includes journal management software to customize workflows.

In the early stages of building the repository, “we’re focused on getting faculty members comfortable with the interface and with the idea of storing their work online,” says Josh Lupkin, faculty liaison for the Digital Repository. “Professors are used to communicating with colleagues in particular ways and publishing in venues specific to their fields. We’re not competing with those, but offering them another way to showcase their work and to make it more visible and accessible.”

Repository staff members are available to address any questions regarding storage, Lupkin says. For example, “some faculty members may have concerns about uploading papers to the Repository, because of publishing agreements. In those cases, we may be able to store an abstract with descriptive keywords and an outside link to the full publication.

“Above all else, this is a service to faculty that will afford them and their departments the benefits of increased relevance in Google and other searches.”

Details about the Digital Repository, including information about submitting materials, can be found at Digital Repository team members are also available to present information sessions tailored to individual schools, departments and centers.

The University’s Norwick Center for Digital Services (nCDS) works with faculty and academic units to identify, manage, upload and present a wide range of text, image, video, audio, database, and other files that showcase SMU’s research and scholarly achievements. The Scholarly Digitization Program – offered by the Office of Research and Graduate Studies – funds digitization of materials through the nCDS for University faculty and staff members who would like to contribute nondigital materials to the Repository but lack the technology or funds required to digitize them. Up to $25,000 per semester is available, and applicants can apply for up to $5,000 of funding per project. The funding application form is available online.

The Repository is working with the Office of Engaged Learning to create a space for approved student work, Lupkin says. Papers from the first three students to complete Engaged Learning projects will be uploaded by May 2012. “The Repository will also give graduate students a forum for getting their work out into the world, after consultation with faculty advisors,” he adds. “It’s all about making connections.”

The Repository can even provide an online home for conferences hosted by a University center or department, Lupkin says. “This could mean anything from storing programs, papers and abstracts to presenting audio or video of individual sessions,” he says. “We can tailor the experience depending on the host entity’s needs.”

For more information, contact Josh Lupkin or Rob Walker at

> Visit the SMU Digital Repository
> Create an SMU Digital Repository account
> Learn more from the SMU Digital Repository FAQ
Learn how to submit materials to the SMU Digital Repository

March 8, 2012|News|

For the Record: Aug. 27, 2010

Asteroid 213629 BinfordLewis Binford, Anthropology, Dedman College, has been honored with an asteroid named for him by the International Astronomical Union. The naming citation for Asteroid (213629) Binford reads, in part, “[Lewis Binford] was one of the main figures behind the development of the ‘New Archaeology’ or ‘Processual Archaeology,’ the major theoretical and methodological improvements to archaeology taking place during the 1960s to 1980s.”

The object was discovered in November 2004 on images taken in August 2002 by the 1.2-meter Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) telescope at Mt. Palomar, California. It is an MB II asteroid, orbiting between Mars and Jupiter with an orbital period of 4 years, a minimum distance to the sun of 2.38 astronomical units (AU) and an estimated size of slightly over 1 kilometer. See the asteroid’s 3D orbit diagram at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory website. (Top right, a composite of three images documenting the asteroid’s discovery, showing it as a tiny moving dot. Click the image for a larger version. Images courtesy of NEAT/NASA.)

Lynne Jackson, Music, Meadows School of the Arts, has received a 2010 Meritorious Achievement Award from the Texas Bandmasters Association (TBA). TBA President and SMU professor Brian Merrill presented the award during the organization’s annual convention and clinic in July in San Antonio. The award honors “those who have made a difference in the lives of band students in Texas” and “who exemplify the qualities of a good band director.”

Cat with serape, ca. 1860Norwick Center for Digital Services, Central University Librares, has received a $20,000 TexTreasures grant to digitize, catalog and upload 2,500 items into the University’s Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection. The annual competitive grant program is designed to help member libraries make their special collections more accessible. Funding is available for projects that involve cataloging, indexing, and digitizing local materials with statewide significance.

NCDS and DeGolyer Library will digitize 19th-century photographs from the Lawrence T. Jones Texas photography collection . This collection, which contains 5,000 photographs, depicts Texans from a variety of cultural groups: Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and American Indian, as well as locations from all regions of the state. (Bottom right, Cat posed with Mexican serape, ca. 1860 from the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection.)

August 27, 2010|For the Record|

For the Record: Sept. 10, 2009

tslac-centennial-logo-120.jpgCentral University Libraries (CUL) has received a $9,000 grant and $3,000 training stipend from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission‘s “Train to Share: Interoperability Training for Cultural Heritage Institutions – Texas” program. The program will allow CUL to partner with two other Dallas institutions, representing the North Texas region, to create the “Texas Artists: Paintings, Sculpture, and Works on Paper” digital project. CUL will lead the partnership, which includes the Norwick Center for Digital Services and the Hamon Arts Library‘s Bywaters Special Collections; the Dallas Museum of Art; and the Dallas Public Library‘s Texas/Dallas History & Archives Division and Fine Arts Division.

Visit CUL’s 14 digital collections online

Are you starting a new fellowship, speaking at a professional meeting, or awaiting the release of a new book? Share your news about conferences, publications, exhibitions and honors with the SMU community. Send your news to the Forum‘s For the Record section at, with “For the Record” in the e-mail title.

September 10, 2009|For the Record|
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