SMU faculty to help lead immigration history conference at Dallas’ Old Red Museum Sept. 19, 2015

Neil Foley

SMU faculty to help lead immigration history conference at Dallas’ Old Red Museum Sept. 19, 2015

Immigrants going through San Angelo, Texas - early photograph, Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photography Collection

A photo by M.C. Ragsdale ca. 1885-90 of immigrants passing through San Angelo, Texas. From the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photography Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

The challenging task of teaching a controversial subject to middle- and high-school students will be the focus of an upcoming immigration conference featuring several University faculty members.

SMU and the Old Red Museum of Dallas County History & Culture are partnering with Humanities Texas and the Texas Historical Commission to present a conference on the history of U.S. immigration from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015 at the museum.

“Issues surrounding immigration are at the forefront of public discourse these days,” said Zac Harmon, executive director of the Old Red Museum. “Statistics and beliefs are strongly held but are often mistaken for facts. This conference will provide documented, factual information for teachers, politicians and other citizens who really want to understand the issue. We are grateful to the Philip R. Jonsson Foundation for sponsoring this first of what we hope will become an annual conference.”

Conference participants can choose to hear two of six speakers scheduled during the morning session. Lunch and a keynote address by Margaret Spellings, president of the George W. Bush Presidential Center and former secretary of education (2005-09), will follow.

Afternoon breakout sessions will provide teachers with lesson plans, materials and strategies to help them make history come alive for students of all grade levels. Teachers attending both sessions can earn six Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

Topics and speakers include:

  • “D/FW Becoming an Immigrant Gateway” – Caroline Brettell, University Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Ruth Collins Altshuler Director of SMU’s Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute
  • “Gone To Texas: Immigration to the Lone Star State in the 19th Century” – Gregg Cantrell, Emma and Ralph Lowe Chair of Texas History, TCU
  • “Immigration and the Changing Face of America” – Neil Foley, Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History, Dedman College
  • “Visualizing the Changing Landscape of U.S. Immigration” – Kyle Walker, assistant professor of population and urban geography, TCU
  • “Managing Migration in an Era of Globalization” – James F. Hollifield, Ora Nixon Arnold Professor of International Political Economy and director of SMU’s Tower Center for Political Studies
  • “Immigration and the Changing Demography of Liberal Democracies” – Gary Freeman, professor of government, University of Texas-Austin

Registration, which includes a continental breakfast, lunch, parking, materials and access to the exhibit area, is $25 and can be completed online at www.oldred.org. For information, contact Shannon Page at the Old Red Museum, 214-757-1927.

Written by Kenny Ryan

September 2, 2015|Calendar Highlights, For the Record, News|

Calendar Highlights: March 27, 2013

Screen shot 2013-03-25 at 1.18.00 PMStanton Sharp Lecture: The Clements Department of History presents “‘The Hispanic Challenge’ and the ‘Mexicanization’ of America” by Neil Foley, SMU’s Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History. Foley will focus on the rapid increase in the Hispanic population since the 1980s and the fear Americans hold that Hispanic immigration will be the end of America’s “core Anglo-Protestant culture.” The lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall, with a reception beforehand at 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Please contact Mildred Pinkston for more information.

Comini Lecture: Susan Verdi Webster, Jane Williams Mahoney Professor of Art History and Studies at the College of William and Mary, will speak on “The Secret Lives of Buildings in Colonial Quito: People, Processes and Cultural Optics” at 5:30 p.m. Friday, March 29 in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum, Webster will discuss Andean and European perspectives on architectural production in colonial Quito, Ecuador, with the view that the way buildings are perceived within a historical context is based upon who is actually doing the looking. Learn about her unique approach to analyzing and understanding architectural production within colonial contexts at this event.

Happy Good Friday and Easter Weekend!

(Images c/o SMU) 

March 27, 2013|Calendar Highlights|
Load More Posts