Calendar Highlights: Nov. 15, 2011

Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Lecture in Jewish Studies

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 15, 2011

Kit Carson tombstone in Kit Carson Park Memorial Cemetery, Taos, New MexicoInto the west: Clements Center Fellow Susan Lee Johnson uses her study of amateur Kit Carson historians Quantrille McClung and Bernice Blackwelder and their published works to map relationships between women historians and male historical subjects, and between professional and nonprofessional U.S. western historians, at a key moment in the 20th century. She will present a Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture, “Bury My Hero at Wounded Knee: Gender, Race, and Historical Practice in the Long 1970s,” at noon Wednesday, Nov. 16, in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Johnson, a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is completing her new book, A Traffic in Men: The Old Maid, the Housewife, and Their Great Westerner. Presented by SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies. (Right, tombstone in Kit Carson Park Memorial Cemetery, Taos, New Mexico.)

Cover of 'The Ten Lost Tribes: A World History'A secret history: Renowned historian and author Zvi Ben-Dor Benite will present the 11th Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Lecture in Jewish Studies at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Benite, professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies and acting director of the Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University, will discuss “The Truly Other Jewish World History: The Ten Lost Tribes Between Jews and Christians.” His subject is a little-known but intriguing episode of early 16th-century Jewish and Christian history, in which Pope Clement VII and the Ten Tribes (almost) defeated Islam and won the Holy Land. Benite’s 2009 book, The Ten Lost Tribes: A World History, traces the legends surrounding the ancient Israelite tribes that were exiled by the Assyrians in the 8th century BCE and vanished from the pages of history, but not from popular imagination. For more information, contact Serge Frolov, 214-768-4478.

Art for sale: Update that holiday gift list – SMU’s Hamon Arts Library holds its 2011 Book Sale at 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday Nov. 17-18 in the Hamon Arts Library, Owen Arts Center. Items for sale include music scores; CDs; DVDs and laserdiscs; and, of course, books on art, music, theater, dance and film, as well as fiction titles. Most items are priced between $1 and $10, and all have no sales tax – plus, the Library will take an additional 50% off all items after 3 p.m. Friday. All sales are final, cash or check only. No holds, bulk discounts or previews. For more information, contact the Hamon circulation desk at 214-768-3813.

November 15, 2011|Calendar Highlights|

Calendar Highlights: March 23, 2010

Alessio BaxAvery Fisher Concert: SMU’s Avery Fisher Career Grant recipients Andrés Díaz (cello) and Alessio Bax (right, piano), with pianist Lucille Chung, will present a free concert of Schubert’s Fantasia in F Minor, Kodaly’s Sonata and Rachmaninoff’s Sonata for Cello and Piano at 8 p.m. March 25 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

When faiths converge: Professor of Religious Studies Yaakov Ariel of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill will present SMU’s 8th annual Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Lecture in Jewish Studies 7:30-9 p.m. March 25 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. “Christian Jews? The New Communities of Jewish Believers in Jesus” explores the roots, history and theology of groups formed during the 1970s, believing that they could overcome traditional divisions and amalgamate the Christian faith with Jewish ethnicity and culture. Presented by SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. For more information, call 214-768-4478.

Song and dance: SMU’s Indian Students Association presents its annual talent show, Mustang Masti, at 6:30 p.m. March 27 in McFarlin Auditorium. Pre-sale tickets are $8 with SMU ID; admission is $10 at the door with SMU ID. Buy tickets online at meraticket.com or contact the ISA for more information.

Heat stress and health: Dr. Craig Crandall, professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at UT-Southwestern Medical Center and research scientist in Presbyterian Hospital’s Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine, will discuss his findings on how the human cardiovascular system responds to heat stress in “Cardiovascular Responses to Severe Heat Stress in Humans.” The lecture begins at 7 p.m. March 31 in Classrooms 1 and 2, Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports. Presented by the Applied Physiology and Sport Management Lecture Series in the Department of Applied Physiology and Wellness of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. For more information, call 214-768-2205.

March 23, 2010|Calendar Highlights|

Levenson to give Nate and Ann Levine Lecture March 16

Jon D. LevensonJon D. Levenson, the Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies at Harvard Divinity School, will give SMU’s Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Lecture in Jewish Studies at 7:30 p.m. March 16, 2009 in McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall.

Levenson’s lecture, “The Binding of Isaac and the Crucifixion of Jesus,” traces the path of development between the story of Isaac’s near-sacrifice of his son in Genesis 22 and the New Testament narrative of the crucifixion of Jesus. Levenson will demonstrate some unrecognized continuities between the two stories and the two religious traditions.

Considered one of the pre-eminent Jewish theologians of our time, Levenson has published dozens of articles and such widely acclaimed books as Resurrection: The Power of God for Christians and Jews (2008), Resurrection and the Restoration of Israel (2006), The Death and Resurrection of the Beloved Son (1995), Creation and the Persistence of Evil (1994), and Sinai and Zion: An Entry Into the Jewish Bible (1987).

Much of Levenson’s work centers on the relationship of Judaism and Christianity, both in antiquity and in modernity, and he has long been active in Jewish-Christian dialogue. His work concentrates on the interpretation of the Hebrew Bible, including its reinterpretations in the “rewritten Bible” of Second Temple Judaism and rabbinic midrash. He also teaches a seminar in the use of medieval Jewish commentaries for purposes of modern biblical exegesis. He has a strong interest in the philosophical and theological issues involved in biblical studies, especially the relationship of premodern modes of interpretation to modern historical criticism.

March 16, 2009|Calendar Highlights, News|
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