Nancy George

Simmons Dean David Chard elected chair of National Board for Education Sciences

David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU's Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human DevelopmentDavid Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has been elected by fellow board members as chairman of the National Board for Education Sciences, effective immediately.

The U.S. Senate approved President Obama’s nomination of Chard to the board in 2012. The 15-member board oversees and directs the work of the Institute of Education Sciences.

“Schools throughout the nation will benefit from David Chard’s leadership of this important board,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “His support of evidence-based education practices will help ensure that proven teaching strategies make their way to the classroom.”

One of the board’s functions is to advise the research priorities for the Institute of Education Sciences, the primary research and evaluation arm of the U.S. Department of Education.

The institute collects and analyzes education research data and funds researchers nationwide who are working to improve education outcomes for all students, particularly those at risk. In addition, the institute produces the Nation’s Report Card. As chair, Chard succeeds Bridget Terry Long from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she is academic dean and the Xander Professor of Education.

Supporting education must be more than rhetoric, Chard says. “We can’t talk about how important education is to the future of our country when we invest so little in knowing what works and for whom it works in the classroom,” he says. “Taxpayer dollars have to be wisely invested in education research and the results of research must be incorporated into our classrooms and schools.”

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

$2.5 million gift will help fund SMU-in-Taos campus center

Carolyn and David Miller

Carolyn and David Miller

A $2.5 million gift from Carolyn and David Miller will help fund a $4 million campus center at SMU-in-Taos in New Mexico.

The Carolyn and David Miller Campus Center will include academic spaces, a media room and a gathering space for groups as large as 100. The great hall will have outdoor views on three sides and a fireplace for chilly mountain evenings.

Outdoor spaces will include a deck that surrounds the building, a plaza that connects the center to other buildings and an entry terrace with seating for events. Groundbreaking is scheduled for July with completion scheduled for May 2015.

The gift to SMU-in-Taos counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date has raised more than $820 million to support student quality, faculty and academic excellence and the campus experience.

“SMU-in-Taos is a gem that offers SMU students a unique learning experience in a setting conducive to discovery. This generous gift from Carolyn and David Miller will enhance our students’ experiences by providing a central place to gather, learn and explore in a facility that embraces its natural setting,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner.

> Dallas Morning News: $2.5 million gift to SMU-in-Taos will bring it closer to Shangri-La

The 423-acre SMU-in-Taos campus opened in 1973 and includes the 19th-century Fort Burgwin and the 13th-century Pot Creek Pueblo archaeological site. Students can earn course credit at the Taos campus during three summer terms and, new in 2014, a January term (J Term). Participation in summer terms has increased more than 40 percent in the last three years.

“The campus center will add another facet to the classroom-without-walls experience at SMU-in-Taos,” said Mike Adler, director of SMU-in-Taos and associate professor of anthropology. “The Millers’ gift is a tremendous step toward the $4 million cost of the building. We look forward to the support of other generous donors.”

The Millers’ gift to SMU-in-Taos is the most recent example of their support of SMU. Their 2011 gift to create the 39,245-square-foot Miller Event Center expansion to Moody Coliseum enhanced facilities in the recently renovated and expanded coliseum, which opened Dec. 31, 2013.

“David and I are delighted to play a part in enhancing the SMU-in-Taos campus,” said Carolyn Miller. “We become SMU-in-Taos students each summer when we attend the Taos Cultural Institute and are thrilled to play a role in strengthening the SMU-in-Taos experience for all students.”

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

2014 Simmons Luminary Awards honor advocates for children

SMU Simmons Luminary Award logoFour organizations that advocate for the education and well-being of at-risk children will be honored Thursday, Jan. 23, by SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The East Dallas Community Schools, TexProtects, the Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children will receive 2014 Luminary Awards at 6:30 p.m. in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center.

“This year’s honorees exemplify the power of collaboration and will to create movements that champion children who are poor, neglected or abused,” says David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of the Simmons School. “These children, like any other, deserve a healthy childhood and a good education; the recipients of the Luminary Award shine an important light on what we need to advance.”

• For 35 years, the East Dallas Community Schools (EDCS) have documented the power of high-quality early childhood education, particularly education that starts young and involves the parents. Based on the Montessori education model, staff at the three EDCS campuses provide parents of 550 students with information, encouragement and support. The schools are located in high-risk Dallas areas and open to children ages nine or younger, regardless of income. School founder and director Terry Nelson Ford, a 1974 SMU graduate, will accept the Luminary Award for local excellence.

• The Texas Association for the Protection of Children (TexProtects) was created in 2004 to advocate for reform and better funding of Child Protective Services in Dallas and across the state. The research and advocacy organization is dedicated to representing the needs of Texas children who have been the victims of abuse and neglect by educating decision-makers and the public about child abuse. Founder and director Madeline McClure will accept the Luminary Award for regional achievement.

• The Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children work with state, local and national child advocates to improve the lives of children. Marian Wright Edelman created the Children’s Defense Fund in 1973 after observing poverty’s devastating effects on children while working with Martin Luther King’s Poor People’s Campaign in the 1960s. The organization advocates for better health care, child care and nutrition, equal educational opportunities and leadership training for children, particularly disadvantaged children. Jonah Edelman will accept the national Luminary Award for the Children’s Defense Fund and Stand for Children.

The Luminary Award was created in 2009 by the Simmons School to honor individuals and organizations that have shown an extraordinary commitment to improving people’s lives through education. The award is given annually to a local, regional and national recipient.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

Renovated Moody Coliseum, Miller Event Center to open for 2013 December Commencement Convocation

SECOND UPDATE Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, 4:28 p.m.: All extra complimentary faculty/staff tickets for the SMU-UConn Moody Coliseum opener have been distributed. No additional complimentary tickets will be available for this game. A limited number of tickets are available for sale. Please contact the SMU Ticket Office at 214-SMU-GAME or visit SMUMustangs.com to purchase tickets.

Moody Coliseum rendering

An artist’s rendering of a new concourse area in SMU’s Moody Coliseum. The freshly renovated venue will reopen for the University’s 2013 December Commencement Convocation on Saturday, Dec. 21.

With the snip of a red ribbon, SMU’s expanded and renovated Moody Coliseum and new Miller Event Center will  open at the University’s 2013 December Commencement Convocation Saturday, Dec. 21.

The 167,000-square-foot complex and Dallas landmark is home to Mustang men’s and women’s basketball, women’s volleyball and SMU academic ceremonies, as well as numerous community events such as concerts, cultural programs and high school graduations. The renovation and expansion features new seating, entertainment areas, court improvements and infrastructure, yet retains the ambiance that has made Moody a favorite venue for more than 50 years.

> Read more about the history of “Moody Magic”

“With this renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and the addition of the new Miller Event Center, SMU will be home to one of the finest collegiate arenas and events centers in the country,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We are thankful to the Moody Foundation and David and Carolyn Miller and others for their support of this facility, which will benefit the entire North Texas area.”

SMU Provost Paul Ludden said that it was appropriate that the first event to be held in the facility will be the University’s December Commencement Convocation ceremony. “Our graduates and their families and friends will help us usher in a new era in this remarkable facility.”

A $20 million gift from the Moody Foundation in 2011 provided the impetus for the extensive expansion and renovation. SMU and the Moody Foundation have enjoyed a long partnership, beginning with a 1965 gift in support of the SMU Coliseum on campus that, in acknowledgement, was renamed Moody Coliseum.  Since that time, the foundation also has supported improvements to Fondren Science Building.

> Visit the New Moody online at newmoody.com

Alumnus and trustee David Miller ’72, ’73 and his wife, Carolyn, also committed $10 million toward the renovation project in 2011. The Miller Event Center, an addition on the north side of Moody Coliseum, named in their honor, includes the Miller Champions Club – a 5,000-square-foot furnished entertainment area on the concourse level – and suites with courtside views, along with administrative areas to support student-athletes and coaches.

The Miller Champions Club is named in honor of David Miller by contributions of several friends, including leadership commitments from Gina and Tucker Bridwell and Belle and Don Berg. Early funding of a feasibility study and conceptual design for this significant construction project was provided by Sylvie and Gary Crum.

All faculty and staff tickets for the opening basketball games on Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014 have been claimed. A limited number of tickets are available for purchase at the SMU Athletics Ticket Office. To help meet the demand, SMU Athletics will also release any unclaimed student tickets to faculty and staff members on Thursday, Jan. 2 after the student ticket pick-up window closes.

Faculty and staff tickets are still available for games on Wednesday, Jan. 15 and Tuesday, Jan. 21.

The renovation celebration at a glance:

Artist's rendering of the new floor in SMU's renovated Moody Coliseum

Artist’s rendering of the new floor in SMU’s renovated Moody Coliseum. Basketball returns to Moody Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014.

  • Friday, December 6, individual game tickets on sale
  • Tuesday, Dec. 17, Leadership Donor Celebration (by invitation)
  • Wednesday, Dec. 18, 7-9 a.m. Basketball Season Ticket Holders’ Preview
  • Saturday, Dec. 21December Commencement Convocation and Building Dedication Ceremony
  • January 4, inaugural athletic events:
    • Men’s Basketball:
    SMU Mustangs vs. University of Connecticut Huskies
    • Women’s Basketball:
    SMU Mustangs vs. University of South Florida Bulls

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story at SMU News

Bing joins SMU faculty in concurrent appointment with Bush Institute

Eric G. Bing

Eric G. Bing has joined the faculties of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

Global health researcher Eric G. Bing has joined the SMU faculty as professor of global health in a concurrent appointment with the George W. Bush Institute.

At SMU, Bing has been named a professor of global health in the Applied Physiology and Wellness Department of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in the Department of Anthropology of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. He remains the senior fellow and director of global health at the Bush Institute.

Under the SMU agreement with the Bush Foundation, Bush Institute fellows can receive concurrent academic appointments at SMU following review and approval by the appropriate academic departments.

“Dr. Bing’s faculty appointment represents one of the many benefits of hosting the Bush Presidential Center at SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The Center will bring us access to global experts who will enhance teaching and research at SMU through concurrent appointments with the Bush Institute. These are scholars with whom we otherwise would not have a relationship but who will now have productive interactions and collaborations with existing faculty, as well as students.”

As director of global health at the Bush Institute since 2010, Bing has initiated worldwide health initiatives, including serving as co-leader of the institute’s Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon partnership, an $85 million public-private program designed to combat cervical and breast cancer in Africa and Latin America.

“It would be difficult to exaggerate the value that Dr. Bing brings to SMU,” said SMU Provost Paul Ludden. “In his career he has directed or co-directed five global health research centers and received more than $140 million in grant support. His work in combating the spread of AIDS is a model for future Africa-United States projects.”

Before joining the Bush Institute, Bing was an endowed professor of global health for nearly 20 years at the Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles. He has developed and managed global health programs in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, including HIV prevention, care and treatment programs in Rwanda, Angola, Nigeria, Namibia, Belize and Jamaica. For his efforts he was awarded the Alfred Haynes International Health Leadership Award in 2002, named in 2006 a Paul G. Rogers International Health Research Ambassador from Research! America and named 2010 Professor of the Year at Charles Drew University.

“We are extremely pleased that Dr. Bing has joined the SMU faculty in addition to his work at the Bush Institute,” said James K. Glassman, executive director of the George W. Bush Institute. “It is the latest example of the excellent cooperation between our two institutions.”

“It’s an honor to join the SMU faculty,” said Bing. “Across campus, in every college, there is an abundance of talent and resources, supported by strong leadership at all levels.  SMU is an ideal place to build effective and productive partnerships that not only cross the campus, but the world.”

Bing has published more than 90 articles and abstracts. He received his medical degree from Harvard University School of Medicine, a Master’s of Public Health and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.  His book, Pharmacy on a Bicycle: Innovative Solutions in Global Health and Poverty, is scheduled to be released in May 2013.

Written by Nancy George

> Read more from SMU News

New DeGolyer Library exhibit features rare Civil War photographs

Pontoon Bridge over Rio Grande River at Brownsville.

Pontoon Bridge over Rio Grande River at Brownsville, ca. 1866, Louis de Planque (attributed) Robin Stanford Collection. View facing Levee Street in Brownsville during Federal occupation. African American soldier from 114th U.S. Colored Troops in the foreground.

A new exhibit at SMU’s DeGolyer Library features rare Civil War images of African American slave life, Southern battlefield scenes and camp life for Union and Confederate soldiers.

“The Civil War in Photographs: New Perspectives from the Robin Stanford Collection” (through March 15, 2013) represents the first time the more than 300 photographs and stereoscope views have been exhibited.

Robin Stanford of Houston has spent the last 40 years assembling the collection. Its strengths include pre-war and wartime Southern views by local photographers and views by northern photographers who documented Union-occupied areas of the South. Her collection also includes images of the daily life of soldiers at mealtime, playing cards and writing letters. Extremely rare Texas Civil War images also are included.

The highlights include:

  • Pre-war slave life with photographs of slave quarters, workshops and plantation life.
  • Images of a damaged Ft. Sumter, South Carolina, after Union troops surrendered and evacuated in 1861.
  • Battlegrounds and scenes rarely photographed, particularly in Southern locations such as Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana.
  • African American soldiers and regiments.
  • Union soldiers in Brownsville, Texas, guarding the U.S. border.

The exhibit is free and open to the public. Library hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

A 95-page catalog of the exhibit, The Civil War in Photographs: New Perspectives from the Robin Stanford Collection, is available for $20. The catalog was created by exhibit curator Anne Peterson.

For more information, visit the DeGolyer Library homepage or call 214-768-2253.

Written by Nancy George

> See more photos from the exhibit at SMU News

Dallas Hall celebrates 100 years on the Hilltop

Historic photo of Dallas Hall under construction

Dallas Hall, under construction. Photo courtesy of the SMU Archives.

On a chilly Thanksgiving Day in 1912, several thousand people gathered on a hill six miles from downtown Dallas. They had traveled by car and chartered train to celebrate the laying of the cornerstone of Dallas Hall, an event The Dallas Morning News described as “a day of jubilation.”

SMU celebrated the centennial of the laying of the Dallas Hall cornerstone Nov. 28, 2012, at a ceremony for the Dallas Hall Society in the Rotunda of Dallas Hall. The Dallas Hall Society recognizes those who contribute to SMU’s future through planned gifts.

In a 30-day countdown that began Homecoming weekend, alumni, students, faculty and staff signed giant Dallas Hall birthday cards and enjoyed birthday cupcakes.

For nearly 100 years, SMU’s elegant first building has served as a symbol of the University, a standard of its classic collegiate Georgian style, home to intellectual discourse for generations of students, and center of SMU’s liberal arts tradition, now Dedman College. Named in honor of the Dallas citizens whose contributions funded the building, Dallas Hall also serves as a symbol of the close relationship the University shares with the city.

Darwin Payne, SMU journalism professor emeritus and noted historian of Dallas, wrote and presented a brief history of Dallas Hall and its place in SMU’s founding at the anniversary celebration, excerpted below:

[A] Southwestern University professor had asked [SMU’s first president, Robert Stewart] Hyer if he truly thought the Methodist church could build a “real” university in Dallas. Hyer had answered: “Yes, but it will just about kill the man who does it. Nevertheless, I am willing to try. I know my limitations—I am not a money raiser. I also know my qualifications. I know how to select a faculty, and a great faculty makes a great school. Therefore, if the money is provided, I believe I can do the job.”

[…]

Precious few of the young students who arrived in 1915 for the beginning of classes – numbering 706 by the end of the first academic year – had ever seen such a building with such massive columns, its beautiful dome, and classic proportions. Their letters home and the oral histories they later gave provide unmistakable evidence of its tremendous impact.

It was a grand time, too, for SMU and for Dallas Hall and for the city of Dallas. So much excitement. So much promise. So much to do. And so much accomplished since then in these hundred years in a campus that now has more than a hundred buildings. But Dallas Hall, as we can see, is as beautiful and inspiring as it was then! It stands as a remarkable testament to the wisdom and forward-thinking of President Hyer, trustees, architects, and many others.

Written by Nancy George

> Find the full story, complete text of Payne’s remarks and historic photos at SMU News

SMU economists examine fighting hunger through social networks

SMU economics researchers will analyze the roles social networks and isolation play in fighting hunger in North Texas.

Recent studies have found that household economic resources are not the only factor contributing to food insecurity, according to SMU economist Tom Fomby. About 1 in 6 U.S. households are affected by food insecurity, meaning there’s not enough food at all times to sustain active, healthy lives for all family members, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

“This study will analyze the role of other factors causing food insecurity, such as urban or rural settings, access to nutrition assistance programs, access to inexpensive groceries, family support and social stigma,” Fomby said.

Fomby, professor of economics and director of the Richard B. Johnson Center for Economic Studies, and Daniel Millimet, SMU professor of economics, are conducting the study. A $120,000 grant from the North Texas Food Bank is funding the research. The study will be complete in March 2014.

Although household income is the single most powerful predictor of food security, poverty and hunger are not synonymous. According to Feeding America, 28 percent of food insecure residents in Dallas County are ineligible for most nutrition assistance programs because they have incomes above 185 percent of the federal poverty level; and the U. S. Department of Agriculture reports that 58.9 percent of U.S. households with incomes below the poverty level are food secure. The reasons for this are not well understood.

“With this research, we expect to better understand the causes of food insecurity in North Texas and improve the assessment of at-risk households,” Fomby said.

The SMU study is one of two major research projects launching The Hunger Center of North Texas, a new collaborative research initiative created by the North Texas Food Bank. The University of North Texas is also collaborating on a study.

“We believe that this research will be groundbreaking,” said Richard Amory, director of research for the North Texas Food Bank. “Nutrition assistance programs tend to approach individuals and households in isolation. Understanding the role that communities play in food security may help us leverage social forces to develop more effective programs and, ultimately, reduce the need for food assistance.”

SMU and the North Texas Food Bank recently formed a partnership, “Stampede Against Hunger,” to build on the University community’s strong support for NTFB, connecting campus groups already working with the food bank, as well as encouraging new types of participation for the campus and alumni community.

The University’s support for the food bank has ranged from traditional food drives and volunteer work in the NTFB distribution center, to research for the food bank conducted by students in the Cox School of Business and the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering.

Faculty and students from the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development volunteer regularly in NTFB nutrition courses, and Fondren Library staff organize a “Food for Fines” drive each year, waiving library fines in exchange for donations of non-perishable food items.

Written by Nancy George, with the NTFB

> Read the full story at the SMU Research blog

Loyds make $5 million gift toward SMU’s Residential Commons

SMU Residential Commons Rendering 2012Paul B. Loyd Jr. ’68 and his wife, Penny Requa Loyd, are continuing their longtime support of SMU with a $5 million gift toward one of five new Residential Commons buildings designed to enhance SMU’s living-learning environment. Their gift was announced during SMU Founders’ Day Weekend at the groundbreaking ceremony for the Commons complex, scheduled to open in fall 2014.

Including this gift, the Loyds’ contributions to SMU have supported a variety of initiatives, most notably SMU Football’s Circle of Champions, the Mustang Band Hall, Meadows School of the Arts scholarships, the Sigma Alpha Epsilon House Fund, and the Paul B. Loyd, Jr. All-Sports Center, adjacent to Gerald J. Ford Stadium. The center, which opened in 2000 with Ford Stadium, houses locker rooms, offices, training and sports medicine facilities for SMU’s 17 sports teams.

The Loyds also provided funding in support of the new Penny and Paul Loyd Center for the Academic Development of Student Athletes (ADSA), housed in the All-Sports Center, which helps student-athletes maximize their athletic and academic potential.

“Nearly every SMU student benefits from the Loyd family’s generosity,” says SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “From students enhancing their study skills and preparing for exams at the Altshuler Learning Enhancement Center and the ADSA, to student athletes working out in the weight room, all in the Loyd All-Sports Center, the Loyds have enhanced the campus experience of SMU students. Now a new generation of students will enjoy living and learning in the Loyd Commons.”

Construction on the Residential Commons complex is under way in the southeast corner of the main campus, near Ford Stadium and the future George W. Bush Presidential Center. The complex will provide housing, parking and dining facilities for 1,250 students, enabling all first- and second-year SMU students to live on campus. Each residential facility will include a faculty residence and offices, classrooms and seminar rooms.

The Loyds serve as members of the SMU Parent Leadership Council. As of the May 2012 graduation of their daughter, three of their five children are SMU graduates. Kelly Loyd graduated in 1996 with a B.S. in economics. Jessica Requa earned in 2008 a B.A. in psychology and a B.B.A. in accounting as well as an M.S. in accounting in 2009. Sarah Requa received a B.A. degree in markets and culture and a B.A. in psychology at SMU’s 2012 Commencement.

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

Marshall Terry to receive 2012 SMU Literati Award

Author and SMU Professor Emeritus Marshall TerryMarshall Terry, the emeritus professor and alumnus affectionately known as “Mr. SMU,” will be honored with the Friends of the SMU Libraries Literati Award at the 2012 Tables of Content dinner Saturday, March 31.

The celebration begins at 6 p.m. at the James M. Collins Executive Education Center with a cocktail reception honoring Top Ten Haute Young Authors, and featuring entertainment by magician and SMU President’s Scholar Trigg Watson. The honorees include Matt Bondurant, Christopher Heaney, P.J. Hoover, Paul Otremba, Dominic Smith, Michael Anthony Steele, Becky Wade, Christine Warren, Jo Whittemore and JoaquÍn Zihuatanejo.

The presentation of Terry’s award and Tables of Content dinner will follow at 7:15 p.m., with SMU faculty members (and other interesting members of the Dallas community) serving as table hosts.

Michael H. Collins and Melissa A. Collins ’10 are honorary chairs for the event.

“As SMU commemorates its centennial, we decided there was no one more fitting to honor than ‘Mr. SMU,’ Marshall Terry,” says Amy Carver, director of Friends of the SMU Libraries. “His legacy as a writer, teacher and mentor to generations of writers is just one of the many reasons we chose to honor him with the Literati Award this year.”

Terry, E.A. Lilly Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, helped President Willis M. Tate write SMU’s 1963 Master Plan, which laid the foundation for the Strategic Plan guiding the University today.

Terry earned Bachelor’s (’53) and Master’s degrees (’54) from SMU. He introduced the creative writing specialty into the English major, served twice as chair of the English Department, founded the nationally recognized SMU Litfest and has directed SMU programs in Madrid, Oxford and Taos. He also served as Faculty Senate president and associate provost for undergraduate education.

His latest book, Loving U: The Story of a Love Affair (And Some Lover’s Quarrels), is an affectionate narrative of Terry’s involvement with SMU over six decades, told with characteristic wit and wisdom. “His life’s work is inextricably bound up in the history of SMU, and his memoir provides us with a valuable perspective on SMU’s past,” said Russell L. Martin III, director of SMU’s DeGolyer Library, which published the book in late 2011.

The Literati Award was created by the Friends of the SMU Libraries in 2010 to honor the 40th anniversary of the founding of the organization, to celebrate the power of the written word and to recognize significant achievements in creativity. The Friends of the SMU Libraries is an organization dedicated to promoting and enriching the resources, services and operations of the eleven SMU libraries. In 40 years, the Friends have funded more than $750,000 in library materials and services.

Past Literati Award winners include former First Lady Laura Bush ’68 (2011) and noted screenwriter and author James V. Hart ’69 (2010).

Tickets are $150 and are available for online purchase. Table sponsorships are also available. All reservations must be received by Monday, March 26. Black tie is optional, and valet parking will be available. For more information, contact Cindy Ruppi, 214-768-3225.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit Friends of the SMU Libraries online at smu.edu/friends

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