A giant undertaking: Larger-than-life SMU legends walk the Hilltop for Centennial Homecoming, Sept. 23-27, 2015

Nancy George

A giant undertaking: Larger-than-life SMU legends walk the Hilltop for Centennial Homecoming, Sept. 23-27, 2015

Ten towering puppets representing giants in SMU history will make special appearances during the University’s Centennial Homecoming festivities, Sept. 23-27, 2015.

Created by Emmy Award-winning Dallas artist Gretchen Goetz, the larger-than-life SMU Giants will walk, wave, and in the case of one giant, perform a well-known cheerleader leap.

“The giants are stylized, whimsical versions of the characters they represent, designed to make people smile and be happy,” Goetz says. Click the YouTube screen to catch a sneak preview from SMU NewsMyles Taylor, or visit this link to watch his Mustang Minute, “The Giants Are Coming,” in a new window.

How to Make a Giant: A Guide

Representing the accomplishments of faculty, alumni, students, staff and administrators from SMU’s history, the giants were selected based on a poll of students, faculty and members of the Celebration Organizing Committee.

At 10- and 12-feet-tall, the giants will be easy to spot, photograph, greet and share the fun as SMU celebrates its Centennial and Homecoming. Watch for them in the State Fair of Texas parade on Friday, Sept. 25 and in SMU’s Homecoming parade on Saturday, Sept. 26.

Written by Nancy George

> Meet the SMU Giants at the SMU News homepage

September 22, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News, Tune In|

Meadows Museum celebrates 50th anniversary with blockbuster show from the Abelló Collection April 18-Aug. 2, 2015

Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884-1920), Portrait of Constantine Brancusi (verso of previous image), 1909. Oil on canvas. P67 – 6/1987, Archive Abelló Collection (Joaquín Cortés).

Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884-1920), Portrait of Constantine Brancusi (verso of previous image), 1909. Oil on canvas. P67 – 6/1987, Archive Abelló Collection (Joaquín Cortés).

As part of its 50th anniversary celebration, SMU’s Meadows Museum will present an exhibition spanning 500 years of Spanish art – and the first in the United States of paintings from the treasure trove of one of the world’s top collectors.

The Abelló Collection: A Modern Taste for European Masters will be on view April 18-Aug. 2, 2015. The show features approximately 70 paintings spanning the 16th to the 21st centuries – including works by such Spanish masters as El Greco, Jusepe de Ribera, Francisco Goya, Salvador Dalí, and Pablo Picasso, as well as by other European artists including Georges Braque, Canaletto, Edgar Degas, Fernand Léger, Henri Matisse and Amedeo Modigliani, among others.

The exhibition will feature Francis Bacon’s Triptych 1983, one of the artist’s final works in this iconic format. Also included will be an ensemble of 15 drawings by Pablo Picasso, representing all periods in his long career.

The Abelló Collection joins the Meadows’ ongoing series of international partnerships that are bringing Spanish masterworks to the United States. In addition, it is a cornerstone to the Museum’s 50th anniversary celebration, which will continue throughout 2015.

Based in Madrid, Juan Abelló is one of Spain’s most prominent art collectors — and has been internationally recognized as one of the top 200 collectors in the world since he began collecting art over three decades ago. Along with his wife Anna Gamazo, Abelló has amassed more than 500 outstanding works of art spanning 500 years of European history.

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish, 1746-1828), Portrait of Juana Garlaza de Goicoechea, 1810

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish, 1746-1828), Portrait of Juana Garlaza de Goicoechea, 1810. Oil on canvas. P28 – 4/1984, Archive Abelló Collection (Joaquín Cortés).

The Abelló Collection is grounded in the couple’s dedication to bringing great national works of art back to Spain that have been dispersed over time in the turmoil resulting from centuries of political and economic strife — from the Napoleonic invasion, to numerous historical financial crises.

Abelló’s collecting bears a parallel to that of Meadows Museum founder and SMU benefactor Algur H. Meadows, who similarly devoted his fortune to the collection, study, and presentation of Spanish masterworks, and to strengthening international awareness of Spain’s robust cultural tradition.

“The Meadows Museum is incredibly grateful for the generosity of Juan Abelló and Anna Gamazo, who have so graciously agreed to lend these extraordinary masterpieces from their collection for an international debut in Dallas,” said Mark Roglán, The Linda P. and William A. Custard Director of the Meadows Museum and Centennial Chair in the Meadows School of the Arts. “We are honored to have the opportunity to present for the first time in the United States paintings from this outstanding collection, which showcases Spain’s powerful artistic legacy, and perfectly coincides with our institution’s founding mission and role as a leader in the research and presentation of Spanish art.”

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story, including a list of exhibition highlights, from SMU News
> Visit SMU’s Meadows Museum online: smu.edu/meadowsmuseum

April 16, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU Women’s Symposium celebrates 50 years, looks to the future Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Lilly Ledbetter

Equal-pay activist Lilly Ledbetter will give the keynote speech at SMU’s 50th annual Women’s Symposium Wednesday, March 4, 2015.

The SMU Women’s Symposium will examine women’s progress through the last 50 years as part of its own golden anniversary celebration on Wednesday, March 4, 2015,

More than 600 attendees are expected to gather at the Symposium, created in 1966 as part of the University’s commemoration of its 50th anniversary. Now the longest running event of its kind, the student-led symposium has challenged, changed and broadened women’s perspectives on campus and in the community.

Lilly Ledbetter, namesake of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 and an advocate for gender wage equality, will present at noon a keynote address about her 10-year battle for pay equality at Goodyear Tire and Rubber.

“Lilly Ledbetter represents women using their voices to create change,” says Karen Click, director of SMU’s Women and LBGT Center. “We’ve been inspired by that for 50 years and hope that we continue, as women, to examine our voices and use them.”

Past speakers have included Hillary Clinton, Maya Angelou, Margaret Mead, Marlee Matlin, Patricia Ireland and Eleanor Clift.

Women's Symposium 2015“For me, Women’s Symposium was a unique opportunity for women to come together to discuss issues in a supportive environment,” says Meg Wuebbels Leal, a Phoenix attorney and government relations specialist who was involved with SMU Women’s Symposium as a student in the late 1980s. “It serves as a great example to young college-age women of how to network and support one another.”

The 2015 symposium will feature a community resource fair, book signing and community awards reception and dinner where Merriott Terry, executive director of IGNITE Texas, will receive the Gail Reese Ward Excellence in Mentoring Award.

The Profiles in Leadership Award will be presented to Roberta Berger, licensed professional counselor and psychologist; Ashley Elsey, founder and owner of Minerva Consulting; Pam Gerbber, executive director, Entrepreneurs for North Texas; Liz Cedillo-Pereira, attorney and founding partner of Cedillo-Pereira and Associates; and Nellie Tafalla, community activist.

The symposium is open to the public and will take place from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at SMU’s Hughes-Trigg Student Center.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit the SMU Women’s Symposium online: smu.edu/womsym
> Find a complete schedule at the SMU News website

March 2, 2015|Calendar Highlights, News, Year of the Student|

Service dogs take on new role as artists’ models in weekend workshop at SMU’s Meadows Museum, Saturday, June 21, 2014

John Bramblitt's painting Little Echo depicts his service dog as a puppy.  Bramblitt, who is blind, will teach his adaptive art techniques in a public workshop at SMU's Meadows Museum Saturday, June 21, 2014.

John Bramblitt’s painting Little Echo depicts his service dog as a puppy. Bramblitt, who is blind, will teach his adaptive art techniques in a public workshop at SMU’s Meadows Museum Saturday, June 21, 2014.

When Denton artist John Bramblitt paints a portrait of his service dog, Echo, he uses red, blue and yellow paint to highlight the image of the black Labrador retriever. To Bramblitt, who is blind, color in his paintings represents emotion, and he is quick to say that Echo is his best friend.

Bramblitt lost his sight as a college student due to complications from epilepsy. Now he is an internationally recognized artist and expert on adaptive art techniques for those with disabilities. He will share his process for painting by touch from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Saturday, June 21, 2014, in the galleries and studio of SMU’s Meadows Museum.

Learn more about John Bramblitt and his art

John Bramblitt with son Jack and service dog Echo

John Bramblitt walks home with son Jack and service dog Echo after Jack’s first day of kindergarten. The internationally acclaimed artist and volunteer leader will teach his award-winning adaptive art workshop at SMU.

The $25 workshop fee ($10 for Meadows Museum members) covers all materials. Advance registration is required; all abilities and levels of experience are welcome.

With service dogs from Guide Dogs of Texas as models, and museum paintings as inspiration, participants will paint their own dog art. The workshop is designed to teach adaptive art techniques to those with disabilities and those without.

At the Meadows, Bramblitt is a consultant to museum educators, helping them develop programs that make the museum accessible to everyone, no matter what their disability or ability.

The 43-year-old also shares the healing power of art in his workshops, which have received three national President’s Volunteer Service Awards.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit SMU’s Meadows Museum online at smu.edu/meadowsmuseum

June 18, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News|

Lance R. Blyth receives Weber-Clements Prize for his examination of “communities of violence” in northern Mexico

'Chiricahua and Janos' book coverA book examining the history of violence on the Mexico border, and how it has provided cohesion as well as disturbance to some communities, has received the 2014 David J. Weber-William P. Clements Prize for the Best Non-Fiction Book on Southwestern America.

SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies will present the annual book prize Wednesday, April 2, to historian Lance R. Blyth for Chiricahua and Janos: Communities of Violence in the Southwest Borderlands, 1680 to 1880 (University of Nebraska Press, 2012). The Weber-Clements Prize honors both the center’s founding director and founding benefactor.

Blyth is deputy director of the Office of History at U.S. Northern Command and a research associate professor at the Latin American and Iberian Institute at the University of New Mexico. He will be honored at a 6 p.m. reception, followed by a 6:30 p.m. lecture and book-signing in DeGolyer Library. The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Call 214-678-3684 to register.

In Chiricahua and Janos, Blyth examines two centuries of violence in northern Mexico between the Chiricahua Apaches and the Hispanic garrison community of Janos. He demonstrates how violence became the primary means by which relations were established, maintained, or altered both within and between communities.

In selecting the book, judges wrote, “Chiricahua and Janos begins with the foundational premise that violence can build as much as disrupt communities. From this premise, it constructs a riveting narrative about how the communities, economies, and families of Chiricahua Apaches and Spaniards at Janos presidio became intricately entwined through two centuries of reciprocal violence and accommodation.”

The Weber-Clements Book Prize is presented by the Western History Association and the Clements Center and is administered by the Western History Association. The $2,500 award honors fine writing and original research on the American Southwest. The competition is open to any nonfiction book, including biography, on any aspect of Southwestern life, past or present.

Written by Nancy George

> Visit SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies online

April 2, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News|
Load More Posts