Celebrate Homecoming 2016 with a ‘Road Trip Home to SMU’ Nov. 3-5

Mustang Band

Celebrate Homecoming 2016 with a ‘Road Trip Home to SMU’ Nov. 3-5

SMU Homecoming float

SMU invites alumni, students, faculty and staff members to load up the car for a “Road Trip Home to SMU”: Homecoming 2016 takes place Nov. 3-5.

Hosted and organized by the SMU Student Foundation, the special events include the 2016 Distinguished Alumni Awards, a Homecoming Parade featuring grand marshals Michael ’83 and Michelle Carter, and reunions for the classes of 1971, ’76, ’81, ’86, ’91, ’96, ’01, ’06 and ’11, as well as Mustang Mini-Reunions for student groups.

The SMU Staff Association invites all staff members to march with them in the Homecoming Parade at noon Saturday, Nov. 5. To participate, wear a red T-shirt and arrive by 11:30 a.m. at the Mustangs statue near Moody Coliseum.

> Find history, traditions and even gameday recipes at SMU’s new Guide to Gameday blog

SMU Student Foundation Homecoming 2016 logo, 'Road Trip Home to SMU'This year’s parade grand marshals are father-daughter Olympians Michael ’83 and Michelle Carter. Michelle won the gold medal in the shot put in the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Her father, Michael, won the silver medal in the shot put in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, played football for SMU’s undefeated teams in 1981 and 1982 and was an NCAA track champion. He is also the only player in NFL history to win an Olympic medal and a Super Bowl ring in the same season.

> Learn more about Homecoming 2016 events from SMU News

Traditional activities also include the Mustang Band’s Pigskin Revue and tailgating on The Boulevard, followed by the SMU-Memphis football game at 3 p.m. in Ford Stadium. SMU Athletics encourages game-goers to observe the #WearBlueSaturday tradition for the Homecoming game.

> More info on the SMU-Memphis Homecoming game at Gameday Central: smumustangs.com/gameday

November 3, 2016|Calendar Highlights, News|

Parade, service projects highlight SMU Dream Week 2016

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at SMU in 1966.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at SMU in 1966.

Fifty years after Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke on the campus of SMU, the visionary civil rights leader’s visit will be celebrated by the University community as part of the Jan. 15-21 Dream Week activities surrounding Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

“This is an opportunity for us as an SMU community to join the rest of the country in celebrating and commemorating the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,” says Director of Multicultural Student Affairs Creston Lynch. “Whether it’s participating in the MLK Day of Service, parade, or any of the week’s programs, there are plenty of chances to reflect in different ways on the issues relating to social justice and equity that Dr. King stood for.”

Headlining the list of SMU Dream Week activities is an appearance by Black Lives Matter founder Alicia Garza, who will speak about the origins of the social justice movement at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Hughes-Trigg Commons.

DREAM WEEK SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, JAN. 15
SMU presents Dallas Civil Rights Museum with memorabilia from 1966 MLK campus appearance

A contingent of SMU representatives, including Student Body President Carlton Adams, Association of Black Students President D’Marquis Allen and former Student Senate Chair Charles Cox, who introduced King before his speech at SMU, will present a transcript of the speech and a photo from the event to the Dallas Civil Rights Museum at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center.

More about the presentation

SATURDAY, JAN. 16
SMU Participates in Dallas’ 34th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration

SMU President R. Gerald Turner will participate in the MLK Community Center’s annual fundraiser by telling the story of how King was invited and came to speak at SMU’s McFarlin Auditorium on March 17, 1966.

Ticket Information: See “Celebration” at the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center Dallas

MONDAY, JAN. 18
SMU Participates in the Dallas Martin Luther King, Jr., Day Parade

Starting Point: 10 a.m. at the intersection of Holmes St. and Martin Luther King, Jr., Blvd.
About: SMU administrators, faculty and students will participate in the annual Dallas parade and celebration. Led by the Mustang Band, participants will include former SMU Student Senate Chair Charles Cox, who introduced King when he spoke at the University 50 years ago, and SMU President R. Gerald Turner. Alumni of SMU’s annual spring break Civil Rights Pilgrimage, members of the SMU Student Senate, incoming SMU Vice President for Student Affairs Pamela Anthony, SMU Vice President for Development and External Affairs Brad Cheves and SMU student athletes and coaches also will join the parade.

Dallas MLK Parade Route

More about SMU at the Dallas Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade

MLK Day of Service

About: SMU students, faculty and staff will join others across the country in a national day of service. Opportunities include building fun and educational environments for children at SPARK!, organizing and restocking a Brother Bill’s Helping Hand grocery store that provides free food to more than 300 families per week, building ramps at homes of those with physical disabilities and helping prepare items for the Dallas region’s homeless. Brunch and transportation provided. Co-sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs and Community Engagement and Leadership.

Read more about SMU’s MLK Day of Service

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20
Commemorative Unity Walk on SMU campus 

Starting Point: Noon at Hughes-Trigg Commons, 3140 Dyer St., Dallas, 75205
About: SMU President R. Gerald Turner and student leaders will lead the annual Unity Walk, a demonstration of the University’s support of Martin Luther King Jr.’s work. All members of the SMU community are invited to join the walk, which will begin at Hughes-Trigg Student Center, continue around Bishop Boulevard and return to Hughes-Trigg. The time together is a demonstration of commitment as a university to the work of Dr. King.

An Evening with Alicia Garza

About: Alicia Garza is co-founder of the “Black Lives Matter” movement. At 5:30 p.m. at Hughes-Trigg, she will talk about the process of creating and spreading the hash tag that branded the movement, the controversy behind it, and her personal experiences in the social justice movement.

THURSDAY, JAN. 21
Film Screening: Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin

About: “Brother Outsider” examines the life of Bayard Rustin, King’s right-hand man and chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Rustin had a significant influence on the civil rights movement, but rarely served as a public spokesman due to his homosexuality and involvement in an interracial relationship. Sponsored by SMU’s Women and LGBT Center at 1:30 p.m. at Hughes-Trigg.

January 15, 2016|Calendar Highlights, News|

Friday Night Stampede celebrates 100 years of Mustang spirit Sept. 19, 2014

SMU football fans celebrate in Ford StadiumSMU celebrates the 100th anniversary of Mustang football with a series of special events the night before the first home game of the 2014 season.

The Friday Night Stampede begins with the dedication of the new Mustang Band Hall near Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports at 7 p.m. Sept. 19. The festivities include a block party that starts at 7:30 p.m. on Mustang Mall, between the Doak Walker and Mustang statues, followed by a Mustang Band concert and pep rally at 8:30 p.m. in Doak Walker Plaza.

The evening will culminate with a unique event: For the first time, the cupolas of Armstrong Commons and the Laura Lee Blanton Building will be illuminated with ceremonial lighting.

Red spirit attire is encouraged. RSVP online at the SMU Community blog.

September 18, 2014|Calendar Highlights, News, Sports|

SMU Board of Trustees raises campaign goal to $1 billion

Bolstered by the success to date of SMU’s Second Century Campaign, the University’s Board of Trustees has raised the goal from $750 million to $1 billion.

At its quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 13, the board voted unanimously to accept the new goal recommended by the campaign’s leadership.

The campaign seeks additional funds for scholarships, academic programs, faculty positions and campus improvements and facilities.

SMU already has surpassed its original goal and timetable, raising $780 million for a campaign scheduled to end in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the University’s opening. That date is now set to mark another milestone – the completion of SMU’s first $1 billion campaign.

SMU will join only 12 other private universities currently seeking goals of $1 billion or more. Among them are Columbia, Duke, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, the University of Chicago and the University of Southern California. SMU is the first comprehensive university in North Texas to seek that amount.

“The generosity of our donors, the strength of our campaign leadership and the hard work of volunteers around the globe have resulted in record-breaking support for SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Even during uncertain economic times, our donors kept the momentum of the campaign going. They did not skip a beat in continuing to fund SMU’s rise in quality and reputation.”

Gerald J. Ford, trustee and convening co-chair of the campaign, said, “The notable investment made in SMU through the campaign demonstrates the University’s positive trajectory and unprecedented momentum. Raising and achieving the campaign goal is the next logical step for SMU as it expands its national and global impact.”

“Adding to SMU’s momentum during its Centennial era, 2011-2015, is the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library, Museum and Institute,” Turner said. “This resource has attracted joint programming, concurrent appointments of SMU faculty and Bush fellows, visiting dignitaries, heightened visibility and more than 206,000 visitors to campus thus far. The support attracted by this resource has already been a tremendous benefit to the campus, city and nation.”

The funding campaign for the Bush Center, conducted by the Bush Foundation, proceeded separately from SMU’s Second Century Campaign, although at the same time. The Bush funding campaign raised more than $500 million for construction, programming and endowment for the Bush Center. “The campaigns have been synergistic, achieving mutual success,” Turner said.

Read about the $1 billion campaign goal in The Dallas Morning News.

Important SMU Priorities

Raising the campaign goal to $1 billion will provide gifts to fund additional scholarships, endowed faculty positions, academic programs and campus life enhancements, including new facilities.

Faculty and academic leadership positions targeted for endowments include those in areas such as entrepreneurship, biostatistics, science and technology law, the impact of the arts on communities, art history, theological studies and library support.

Academic programs earmarked for new endowments and operational support represent areas of growing importance to the region and nation, among them programs in energy management, public policy, interdisciplinary studies, cyber security, arts research and K-12 school leadership.

Increased scholarship funding is being sought to support top undergraduate and graduate students throughout the University. These resources will ensure that SMU can educate the next generation of leaders in areas such as the arts, sciences, business and engineering, disciplines that, with others, are critical to the future of Dallas.

Capital projects for academics include the renovation of Fondren Library Center in Central University Libraries and Bridwell Library in Perkins School of Theology. In addition, funding is being sought for new campus facilities, such as the Residential Commons complex and the Mustang Band Hall, now under construction. The campaign also seeks to complete funding for renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and construction of new complexes for tennis, golf and other sports, along with operational support for athletics.

SMU Board of Trustees chair and campaign co-chair Caren Prothro emphasized the case for going forward with a new goal: “The campaign has achieved remarkable results that can be seen in our impressive gains throughout the University, but its momentum tells us that much more can be accomplished. On behalf of the students we seek to serve and the faculty who help to shape their futures, we need additional resources for scholarships to attract the best among them and continue to increase our diversity. We need to recruit and retain faculty devoted to teaching, research and creativity with an impact on their disciplines and society. We want to establish and support new academic programs that will prepare students for leadership in their professions and communities. And we must provide the best facilities for these endeavors in a living-learning environment that is second to none.”

To Mike Boone, chair-elect of the SMU Board of Trustees, the University stands at a crossroads of opportunity and is ready to take a bold step forward. “At critical times in Dallas’ history, the city has been transformed by decisions that resulted in world-class assets for our community. Among these are an airport that serves as a global hub, a thriving arts district, a distinguished medical school producing Nobel laureates and a vibrant business community. Our new campaign goal signals the unequivocal commitment to join the list of milestones that have changed our community and its impact on the world.”

Results and Impact

To date, the campaign has raised funds for 472 new scholarships; 24 academic programs such as new schools, institutes and centers; 34 endowed faculty positions, bringing SMU’s total to 96 out of a goal of 100; and 26 capital projects, including new or expanded facilities for libraries, academic programs and athletics.

Many of the new academic programs SMU has created have direct impact on the Dallas region, such as new centers for legal services and financial studies. Schools recently endowed are the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering and the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, which focuses on school reform and programs for community impact. Other programs contribute to research and dialogue on important national and international issues, such as the Scholars Program of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, focusing on public policy and service, and the Embrey Human Rights Program. Still other resources, among them expanded acquisitions for the Meadows Museum and a new National Center for Arts Research, broaden the city’s reputation in the arts internationally.

In another measure of impact and rising quality, the average SAT score of entering students has risen from 1144 in 1999 to 1302 in 2013, thanks to increasing resources for scholarships.

“These resources bring outstanding students to Dallas and help to keep our bright local students in our region, all of which enriches the talent pool here,” said Carl Sewell, trustee and campaign co-chair. “Funding for new academic positions has enabled us to attract and retain scholars from throughout the world. Professors named to endowed chairs are distinguished scholars at the top of their careers and reputations,” he added. “They bring important research projects and work not only with graduate students, but also with undergraduates, mentoring them and involving them in their research.”

Ray L. Hunt, trustee and campaign co-chair, notes that increased academic resources “enable SMU to be nimble in creating new programs in emerging fields.” Examples include centers in alternative asset management, engineering leadership, and global markets and freedom. “Access to these programs will help our graduates to compete and lead in key areas where new expertise and perspectives are needed and will increase their contributions to critical areas for our nation and the world.”

As SMU changes with the impact of the campaign, “the community will be better served and Dallas will have the distinguished university it deserves,” said Mike Boone. “Regional leaders know that as SMU rises as a center of ideas, knowledge and service, our region will be strengthened as a global center of commerce and culture. Campaign resources have strengthened not only the University, but also the economic vitality of the region,” he said. “SMU is both an indicator and a predictor of success for Dallas and our region. We will continue to prosper together.”

Campaign Participation and Leadership

Thus far 58,159 donors have made one or more gifts to the campaign. This includes 279 who have given $100,000 or more, and 123 who have committed $1 million or more, an all-time high for SMU.

SMU’s campaign goals also include giving levels among alumni. The campaign seeks gifts from 25 percent of alumni each year and from 50 percent over the course of the campaign. Thus far more than 50 percent of SMU alumni have made one or more gifts during the campaign. A record 24 percent of alumni provided gifts in the fiscal year ending May 31, 2013, representing the highest number of alumni ever to give to SMU in a single year.

“The concept of a billion dollars may seem overwhelming, but the fact is that it will take gifts of all sizes for us to meet our new goal,” said Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler, a trustee and campaign co-chair. “So we’re asking our alumni to take part at any level they can afford. It all counts, and it all makes a difference. Together, we are living up to the theme of our campaign, SMU Unbridled.”

The Second Century Campaign is led by five co-chairs: Convening co-chair Gerald J. Ford, with Ruth Altshuler, Ray L. Hunt, Caren H. Prothro and Carl Sewell. They lead a 15-member Campaign Executive Council and nearly 40 Steering Committee co-chairs spearheading various fundraising efforts, such as those for each school, the libraries, athletics and student life. Regional campaigns range from New York to Los Angeles and from Mexico City to Hong Kong. Campaign committee members total more than 350 worldwide, and hundreds of others are providing volunteer support.

September 13, 2013|News|

Homecoming 2012 celebrates Centennial milestones and memories

Peruna with SMU spirit squadSMU celebrates Homecoming 2012 with milestones and memories from its hundred-year history. The festivities take place Oct. 25-28 in locations all over campus.

The celebration begins with the 2012 DAA Awards Thursday, Oct. 25 and continues through a weekend of picnics, reunions, and the SMU-Memphis game in Ford Stadium.

> Visit the SMU Homecoming homepage

The University’s oldest tradition, Pigskin Revue, celebrates its 78th anniversary at 8:15 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26 in McFarlin Auditorium. Tickets for this year’s show, “Holidaze,” are free and can be picked up in advance at the Mane Desk in Hughes-Trigg Student Center. Tickets will also be available at the McFarlin box office beginning at 7:15 p.m. Friday.

In conjunction with Pigskin Revue, the organizing committee and the Mustang Band are also collecting canned food for the North Texas Food Bank, with a goal of 2,386 cans – one for every seat in McFarlin. Look for collection boxes in residence halls, Hughes-Trigg Student Center, and other buildings around campus.

Blake Mycoskie

Blake Mycoskie

Leading up to the Mustangs’ football game against the Memphis Tigers, the SMU Homecoming Parade begins at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, and will celebrate the role that SMU has played in the Dallas community since its founding in 1911. The parade will feature Blake Mycoskie (pictured right), SMU alumnus and TOMS Shoes “chief shoe giver,” as grand marshal. SMU alumnus Dan Bell will serve as parade emcee.

Download a 2012 SMU Homecoming activities map (PDF format)

This year, the expanded Homecoming parade will begin at University Boulevard and Hillcrest Avenue. The procession will wind its way along Hillcrest and through the SMU campus with student floats, bands and entertainment. Bright red and blue Centennial Bicycles will make their debut in the parade.

“As we celebrate SMU’s centennial, we are especially pleased to welcome back our alumni and show them the progress they have helped to make possible with their support,” says SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “We also are proud to recognize a great entrepreneur and philanthropist as our Homecoming grand marshal. Through his TOMS Shoes’ One For One Movement, Blake Mycoskie is an example of how our alumni contribute to the world.”

> Find a full list of 2012 Homecoming activities at SMU News

October 25, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News, Save the Date|
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