Meadows Wind Ensemble

Calendar Highlights: April 6, 2010

Meadows Percussion Ensemble tympani playerDrumming up excitement: Guest artists Don Fabian (principal saxophone of the Dallas Wind Symphony), Jamal Mohamed, Jonathan Jones, Leland Byrd and Meadows Dean José Bowen join the Meadows Percussion Ensemble, under the direction of Jon D. Lee, for its 2010 spring concert at 8 p.m. April 7 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. The program includes István Márta’s Doll’s House Story Daniel Levitan’s Marimba Quartet and Patrick Glenn Harper’s City Lights. Admission is free. For more information, call the Division of Music at 214-768-1951.

One Day Without Shoes bannerShoes to fill: SMU’s Office of Leadership and Community Involvement (LCI) invites the entire community to experience “One Day Without Shoes” on April 8. The event is organized by TOMS Shoes to spread awareness about the impact a pair of shoes can have on an impoverished child’s life. SMU participants are asked to go the day, part of the day or even a few minutes barefoot to experience a life without shoes first-hand. LCI will provide a shoe valet and collect new and gently used shoes for donation. Learn more and RSVP online for a chance to win an all-expenses-paid place on a TOMS Shoe Drop. For more information, call 214-768-4403 or stop by 318 Hughes-Trigg Student Center.

2010 Scott-Hawkins Lecture: SMU’s Department of Religious Studies and Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series welcome Jeffrey Kripal, chair of the Department of Religious Studies at Rice University, for a lecture entitled “Beyond Belief, Beyond Reason: Religion, Science and the Paranormal.” The event begins at 7 p.m. April 8 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 214-768-2095.

Text musicmaking: SMU’s Meadows Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Jack Delaney, presents what might be the first concert in which members of the audience are asked to leave their cell phones on. During “By Request Only – Cell Phones Required,” audience members will using text messages to select pieces for performance from a menu including medleys of hits by Michael Bublé and Coldplay, Beethoven’s Octet Op. 103, Gustav Holst’s First Suite in E flat, a set of Sousa marches, Varese’s Octandre, and a Bach chorale. Join the calling circle at 8 p.m. April 9 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center – tickets are $7 each for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Rocking the late night: Atmospheric lighting and DJ’ed music are just two of the attractions of Midnight Cosmic Climbing, offered by SMU Outdoor Adventures at 11 p.m. April 9 at the Climbing Center, Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports. The event is free – bring your own harness and shoes, or borrow them at the center. For more information, contact Assistant Manager Albert Mitugo, 214-768-9918.

Calendar Highlights: Feb. 16, 2010

Showing their work: SMU graduate students will present their research in engineering and the natural and social sciences – and get valuable experience working with the formats they will use as professionals – during the University’s 2010 Research Day Feb. 16 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Poster presentations take place 2-4:30 p.m., and oral presentations from 12:30-4 p.m. An award of $250 will be given to the best presentation from each department with more than three presenters in attendance. Sponsored by Dean James Quick, Office of Research and Graduate Studies. For more information, contact Phyllis Payne, 214-768-4336.

Ash Wednesday service: The 2010 Lenten season begins with SMU’s ecumenical Ash Wednesday service beginning at 12:05 p.m. Feb. 17 in Perkins Chapel. University Chaplain Stephen Rankin will deliver the day’s message, “Testing Our Treasure.” The service is open to the entire SMU community. For more information, visit the Chaplain’s Office website.

Test your metal: SMU’s Meadows Wind Ensemble kicks off its spring performance schedule with “Heavy Metal,” an evening of works written for metal instruments. The program includes music by Gunther Schuller, Augusta Read Thomas, John Cage, Johann Hummel and SMU Professor Martin Sweidel – with a possible encore featuring the music of Metallica. The show begins at 8 p.m. Feb. 19 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 each for SMU faculty, staff and students. Buy tickets online or contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Clements Center 2010 Symposium poster artClements Center Public Symposium: The family histories of the American West will be the focus of the 2009-10 Annual Public Symposium presented by SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies. “On the Borders of Love and Power: Families and Kinship in the Intercultural American West” is cosponsored by the Center for the Southwest at the University of New Mexico, the Institute for the Study of the American West at the Autry National Center and the Clements Center. It will take place 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Feb. 27 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Register online or contact the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, 214-768-3684.

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 10, 2009

Plantation store, 1939Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Clements Center Fellow Sarah Cornell examines the clashes between workers and planters in early 20th-century Mississippi and Louisiana in “Planters and Peons: Mexican Workers in the U.S. South” at noon Nov. 11 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch. For more information, contact the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, 214-768-3684. (Right, African American and Mexican cotton pickers in a plantation store, Mississippi Delta, 1939.)

“Holocaust Legacies” symposium: A panel of Holocaust historians, educators and survivors – as well as gerontologists, social workers and pastoral care clergy – will discuss findings from a study on resilience, forgiveness and survivorship among older Holocaust survivors in “Holocaust Survivors: Stories of Resilience.” Presenters include Roberta R. Greene, School of Social Work, University of Texas; and Harriet L. Cohen, Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Social Work, TCU. The symposium takes place 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Nov. 12 in the Great Hall, Perkins Prothro Hall, and is part of the “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” series presented by SMU’s Human Rights Education Program.

A song in their hearts: The Dallas Opera/SMU Emerging Artist Program presents Opera in a Box: Follow Your Dreams, written and directed by Meadows Opera Theatre Director Hank Hammett. Using props and costumes, four aspiring opera singers share their personal passions, experiences and joys while creating some of their favorite characters onstage. The performance is sung in English and begins at 1 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center. Cosponsored by The Dallas Morning News. Free and open to the public.

Meadows Wind EnsembleSix by Tenn: The Meadows Wind Ensemble (right) leads an evening of music and poetry featuring mezzo-soprano and SMU Professor Virginia Dupuy in a performance of Warren Benson’s Shadow Wood: Six Poems of Tennessee Williams, composed on commission for the Meadows Wind Ensemble and featured on the Ensemble’s first commercial CD in the late 1990s. The program also features Joseph Schwantner’s Music of Amber with Meadows pianist and professor Samuel Holland as guest soloist, Augusta Read Thomas’s Magneticfireflies and a set of works by Toru Takemitsu. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Nov. 13 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 each for students, faculty and staff members. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 ((214-SMU-ARTS).

“Meadows at the Bath House” Series: The Meadows School of the Arts faculty jazz quintet Jampact will perform with videographers and movement artists using live cameras and improvisation to create a unique performance experience. The show begins at 8 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Bath House Cultural Center on White Rock Lake, 521 E. Lawther Drive. Tickets are $5 each. For more information, contact Kim Corbet at 214-542-5663 or visit the Bath House Cultural Center website.

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 13, 2009

land-of-necessity-bookcover-200.jpgClubhouse Lunch: Assistant Professor Hector Rivera, director of the Center for Child and Community Development in the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, speaks on “Integrating English Language Learners Into Our Schools – What Do We Need to Know?” at noon Oct. 14 in the Faculty Club. The lecture is part of the SMU Faculty Club’s Clubhouse Lunch series. Lunch is $5, or feel free to bring your own.

Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Associate Professor of History Alexis McCrosson discusses her new book, including the visual rhetoric of scarcity and abundance in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands and their history of “institutions of abundance” such as department and “big box” stores, in “Land of Necessity: Consumer Culture in the United States-Mexico Borderlands” at noon Oct. 14 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Presented by the Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Dedman College. Bring your lunch.

Long live the King: The Meadows Wind Ensemble spends a musical evening with an American icon in “Elvis Has Left the Building” at 8 p.m. Oct. 16 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. The program features an Elvis “Vegas” medley, Michael Daugherty’s Dead Elvis, Eric Whitacre’s Godzilla Eats Las Vegas and a set of works by Frank Zappa – as well as a possible appearance by “the King” himself. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Music for a cause: The Meadows Chorale opens its season with a program of contemporary music that celebrates the passage of life into afterlife at 2 p.m. Oct. 18 in Perkins Chapel. “Each Shall Arise” features works by Tarik O’Regan, Morten Lauridsen and Eric William Barnum. In lieu of admission, online donations are requested for the North Texas Food Bank. Food items may also be donated in person at the concert. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 30, 2008

The Big iDea: Student teams that received grants in the 2007-08 Big iDeas competition will report on the progress of their projects and explain their research findings in the Big iDeas Fall Symposium, 10-11:30 a.m. Nov. 4 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. A brief reception will follow.

Meadows Wind Ensemble Director Jack DelaneyGodbey Lecture Series: Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor Melissa Barden Dowling, director of SMU’s Classical Studies Program, examines the achievements of the men known as the Five Good Emperors and how they balanced the great issues of their times in the Godbey Lecture Series‘ Boshell Foundation Lecture, “The Good Emperors and the Golden Age of the Roman Empire.” The series begins Nov. 4 and continues on consecutive Tuesdays, with the third lecture scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 13. All lectures begin at 11 a.m. with lunch at noon at Maggiano’s NorthPark Center. Cost is $156 for Godbey Lecture Series members and $186 for nonmembers. Register online or contact the Godbey Lecture Series, 8-2532.

World premiere winds: The Meadows Wind Ensemble welcomes acclaimed contemporary percussion ensemble NEXUS for the world premiere of Eric Ewazen‘s Concerto for Percussion and Wind Ensemble – composed on commission for the MWE, NEXUS and MWE Director Jack Delaney (top right) – in “The Beat of Different Drummers!” at 8 p.m. Nov. 4 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. Contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

'Spaniard and his Mexican Indian Wife and their Child' by Miguel Cabrera, 1695-1768Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Kelly Donahue-Wallace, chair of the Departments of Art Education and Art History at the University of North Texas, discusses the global influences found in objects from well-to-do colonial homes in “A caballo entre dos mundos: Material Culture in Spanish Colonial Texas.” The lecture begins at noon Nov. 5 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Bring your lunch. (Bottom right, Spaniard and his Mexican Indian Wife and their Child, from a series on mixed race marriages in Mexico. Oil on canvas by Miguel Cabrera, 1695-1768, Museo de America, Madrid, Spain/The Bridgeman Art Library.)

Inside baseball: Baseball Hall of Famer, former American League and National League MVP and former American League manager of the year Frank Robinson will address the Guaranty Bank SMU Athletic Forum Nov. 5 at the Hilton Anatole Hotel, 2201 Stemmons Freeway. The luncheon and talk last from noon to 1:30 p.m. For more information, contact Suzy Brack, 8-4314.

Jazz hands: The Varsity in SMU’s Hughes-Trigg Student Center becomes a jazz club for a free performance by electro-acoustic jam band JamPact at 8 p.m. Nov. 5. The band – a collaboration among Meadows Dean José Bowen (piano) and music faculty members Kim Corbet (trombone and synth), Buddy Mohamed (bass), Jamal Mohamed (drums) and Akira Sato (trumpet) – performs “an improvisational mix of jazz, funk and world music.” Appetizers and coffee drinks will be served during the concert. For more information, contact Mariana Sullivan, 8-1951.

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 2, 2008

Sweet Honey in the RockFast times: The Meadows Wind Ensemble presents “A Short Ride to Motown!” at 8 p.m. Oct. 3 in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

Art and Soul 2008: SMU’s Perkins School of Theology hosts the Grammy Award-winning a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock (top right) at 7:30 p.m Oct. 3 in The Majestic Theatre in downtown Dallas. The concert is part of Art & Soul 2008, a quadrennial program made possible by the Claudia and Taylor Robinson Lectureship at Perkins School of Theology. Tickets are $20-$45 and are available from www.ticketmaster.com and at any Ticketmaster outlet, or by calling 214-373-8000.

Marcus BuckinghamFind your strengths: SMU Cox Executive Education and External Affairs welcome career success expert and 2007-08 Tate Distinguished Lecturer Marcus Buckingham (bottom right) for a special presentation to the SMU community. “The Truth About You” takes place at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 6 in McFarlin Auditorium, and special ticket pricing is available for SMU students, faculty and staff. For more information, call 8-4174.

Culture and revolt: Dedman College’s Graduate Program in Religious Studies presents David N. Hempton, Alonzo L. McDonald Family Professor of Evangelical Theological Studies at Harvard Divinity School, in the 2008 Tate-Willson Lectures. Hempton will speak on “Culture Wars: George Eliot and Fundamentalism” at 7 p.m. Oct. 6 and “Artists in Revolt: Vincent van Gogh and James Baldwin” at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 7 at Highland Park United Methodist Church, Room 120. The lectures are free and open to the public.

About the journey: SMU hosts producer Morgan Atkinson in a screening of his film “Soul Searching: The Journey of Thomas Merton” at 7 p.m. Oct. 8 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. The event is free and open to the public; donations will be accepted. Sponsored by the Office of the Chaplain and Religious Life, Catholic Campus Ministry, Pax Christi and the Maria Kannan Zen Center.

Calendar Highlights: April 3, 2008

Judaica Lecture: Serge Frolov, Nate and Anne Levine Endowed Chair in Jewish Studies in SMU’s Department of Religious Studies, speaks on “Pillar of Smoke: Religious Responses to the Holocaust” at 2 p.m. April 6 in Bridwell Library. For more information, call 8-3483.

Birthday song: The Meadows Wind Ensemble honors Professor Simon Sargon with a 70th-birthday concert featuring commissioned pieces written by Sargon for the Wind Ensemble – including the world premiere of a new overture. The concert takes place at 3 p.m. April 6 in Caruth Auditorium; tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

True colors: Master of Fine Arts candidates show their work in the 2008 M.F.A. Qualifying Exhibition, April 7-19 in Pollock Gallery, Hughes-Trigg Student Center.

Perkins Public Lecture: SMU’s Perkins School of Theology presents “Xenophobia and Xenophilia: Toward a Theology of Migration,” a public lecture by Luis Rivera-Pagan, Henry White Luce Emeritus Professor of Ecumenics at Princeton Theological Seminary and visiting professor in Perkins, at 7 p.m. April 7 in Perkins Chapel. For more information, contact David Maldonado.

Sellers’ market: SMU’s vendors will meet the campus community at the 2008 SMU Purchasing Vendor Fair 11 a.m.-2 p.m. April 8 in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom. Festivities include food, games and prizes. For more information, contact SMU Purchasing, 8-3239.

Hesburgh Lecture: John Gaffney, professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, discusses “Lost in Translation? Bringing American Ideals to the Middle East” at 7 p.m. April 8 in Room 131, Dedman Life Sciences Building. Cosponsored by SMU’s Department of Anthropology and Human Rights Education Program, with the Notre Dame Club of Dallas. For more information, contact Van Kemper.

Brand excitement: Veteran ad man and SMU alumnus Hal Curtis will be interviewed by Krys Boyd of KERA’s “Think” program discussing “Brand Heroism: Advertising As a Force for Good” in the 2008 ExxonMobil Lecture Series. The April 10 lecture begins at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium, with a coffee and chocolate reception at 9 p.m. in the Owen Arts Center lobby. Sponsored by SMU’s Temerlin Advertising Institute and Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility. Admission is free; tickets are required. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

Works by Graham, Tharp featured in Spring Dance Concert

A scene from the SMU production of Martha Graham's 'Lamentation'The Meadows Dance Ensemble at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts will perform works by Martha Graham and Twyla Tharp in its 2008 Spring Dance Concert, April 2-6 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

The featured dances will be Lamentation (left), a solo masterwork by Graham, and Octet, Tharp’s critically acclaimed 1991 piece for four men and four women. Lamentation, considered by many to be Graham’s most famous solo work, was first performed in New York by Graham herself in 1930. The eight Octet dancers were trained by guest artist Shawn Stevens, a former Twyla Tharp company member who premiered the work in New York. Read more.

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Calendar Highlights: Nov. 9, 2007

cowboys-cattlemen-250.jpgJazz in the winds: The Meadows Wind Ensemble performs the music of Mingus, Bernstein, Joplin and Broege in “No Sun, No Shadow” at 8 p.m. Nov. 11 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty and staff. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

Survival stories: Sudanese survivors of violence tell their stories in their own words in “Voices from Sudan,” hosted by SMU’s Human Rights Education Program, 7 p.m. Nov. 12 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. The panel will feature refugees from Darfur as well as those who fled southern Sudan to escape the violent civil war. Free and open to the public.

Source code: Veteran newsman Tony Pederson, SMU’s Belo Distinguished Chair in Journalism, speaks on “Reporter Privilege: A Con Job or an Essential Part of Democracy?” Nov. 14 in the Umphrey Lee Center Ballroom. The event, sponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, begins with a reception (heavy hors d’oeuvres) at 11:30 a.m., followed by the lecture at noon. Free and open to the public.

Living responsibly: SMU students will discuss, debate and engage the issue of substance abuse at the University during a Substance Abuse Forum from 11:30 a.m.-12:50 p.m. November 14 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons. Panelists will include senior Todd Baty, business manager of the weekly newsletter Hilltopics, with members of the Task Force on Substance Abuse Prevention: Dean of Student Life Dee Siscoe, English Professor Dennis Foster, Political Science Professor Dennis Simon, and Student Body President Katherine Tullos. For more information, visit the Live Responsibly home page.

Boys against men: Jacqueline Moore, Fellow in SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies, discusses “Cow Boys and Cattle Men: Restraining Masculinity on the Texas Frontier” at noon Nov. 14 in DeGolyer Library. The lecture is part of the Clements Center Brown Bag Series – bring your lunch. For more information, contact Ruth Ann Elmore, 8-3684. (Top left: Cow Boys and Cattle Men on the Matador Ranch 1883, courtesy of the Southwest Collection, Texas Tech University.)

Cave exploringNew traditions: The Meadows Jazz Orchestra explores the traditions of large ensemble jazz and introduces new works by professional and student composers in a concert at 8 p.m. Nov. 15 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center. Catch the MJO performing in the Meadows Fall Dance Concert through Nov. 11.

When “caving” is a good thing: Sign up by Nov. 16 for Recreational Sports’ Jester Cave overnight camping trip (bottom left), scheduled for Nov. 30-Dec. 1. Learn more online at the Outdoor Adventures home page or contact David Chambers, 8-9918.

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 27, 2007

Meadows dance studentsWhat’s opera, doc? The Meadows Opera Theatre presents scenes and songs from opera and musical theatre in a brown bag event, “Opera Free For All,” at 1 p.m. Sept. 28 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center.

Sounds of Spain: The Orchestra of New Spain presents a concert of Renaissance music from Valencia at 5 p.m. Sept. 30 in the Virginia Meadows Galleries, Meadows Museum. Tickets are $25 each for general admission, $20 each for Meadows Museum members.

Brown Bag Dance returns: The Meadows Division of Dance (top left) presents its fall 2007 Brown Bag Dance Series at noon each day Oct. 1-5 in the Bob Hope Theatre lobby, Owen Arts Center. Bring your lunch and watch SMU dance students perform original works in ballet, jazz and modern dance.

Sophia Loren with Stanley MarcusMore Fortnight fun: DeGolyer Library Curator Anne Peterson gives an illustrated history of “The Store” in “Fortnight, Fashion and Fun: Neiman Marcus Celebrates 100 Years in Dallas” Oct. 4 in DeGolyer Library. A reception begins at 6 p.m., with the lecture at 6:30 p.m. The DeGolyer exhibition “Merchandise for the Millions: American Trade Catalogs” opens the same day and will run through Feb. 15. (Middle left, Sophia Loren and Stanley Marcus activate a recreation of the Villa D’Este fountains during the department store’s 1975 Italian Fortnight.)

Global impact: The Perkins School of Theology presents “Religion and Empire: Politics, Faith and the Future of Globalization” Oct. 4. Ulrich Duchrow, professor of systematic theology at the University of Heidelberg, will speak on “Faith Communities and Empire: Global Hope and Western Challenge” at 7 p.m. in Perkins Chapel. SMU Professor of Systematic Theology and symposium organizer Joerg Rieger will join Duchrow and scholars from SMU, TCU, Baylor, Phillips Theological Seminary and Princeton for an academic symposium on “Religion and Empire” 4-6 p.m. in the Kirby Hall parlor. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Jeorg Rieger, 8-2356.

Meadows Wind EnsembleWinds and “Fire”: The Meadows Wind Ensemble (bottom left) presents “Magneticfireflies,” featuring the title music from their new CD as well as the world premiere of composer Cindy McTee’s Finish Line for wind symphony. The show begins at 8 p.m. Oct. 5 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students; for more information, call 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

Outdoor Adventures: Sign up by Oct. 5 for the Beaver Bend weekend canoe trip Oct. 12-14 on the Upper Mountain Fork River, Oklahoma. Cost is $70; a pre-trip meeting is scheduled for Oct. 9. For more information, visit SMU Recreational Sports or contact David Chambers, 8-9918.

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