Calendar Highlights: Oct. 29, 2013

Meadows Symphony Orchestra

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 29, 2013

Fame & photography: The Meadows Museum presents a lecture on the evolution of art and its influence on society, “The Construction of Artistic Celebrity in the Late Nineteenth Century,” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29. The lecture focuses on the 1850s and the introduction of mass-produced photographic prints, and “how art dealers, photographers and journalists worked in concert to transform artists into trendsetters and their works into status symbols for nouveau riche collectors.” Anne McCauley, Professor of the History of Photography and Modern Art at Princeton University, will give the lecture and use the album compiled by William H. Stewart, recently acquired by Meadows, to convey her point. The lecture will be in the Bob and Jean Smith Auditorium and is free to attend.

Collage c/o SMU Women's & Gender Studies Program

Shelby Knox (Collage c/o SMU Women’s & Gender Studies Program)

Feminist, Activist, Texan: Women’s rights activist Shelby Knox will speak at SMU, Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m. Knox started her women’s rights journey at 15 years old when she campaigned to have her Lubbock high school adopt comprehensive sex education as well as allow a gay-straight alliance. Her work was then chronicled in the 2005 Sundance film, “The Education of Shelby Knox.” Knox now travels across the country speaking and hosting workshops on women’s issues; she is also working on a book. The SMU Women’s and Gender Studies Program invites you to this free event in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall.

As the Nation May Direct: The Clements Center for Southwest Studies presents a Noon Talk on “Pensions and the Financing of a Post-Removal Cherokee Nation” Wednesday, Oct. 30at noon. The talk will focus on the history of Cherokee pensions, starting with the Red Stick Revolt in the War of 1812, and how they have changed since then and what that means for the Cherokees. Julie Reed will host the talk; she is the David J. Weber Research Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America at the Clements Center. Reed is also revising for publication her book manuscript, Ten Times Better: Cherokee Social Services, during her time at the Clements Center. Noon Talk is free and open to the public and will be held in DeGolyer Library.

MSO: Meadows Symphony Orchestra invites you to a concert featuring guest violinist and SMU Meadows Artists-in-Residence Chee-Yun Kim. Kim attended Juilliard School of Music, has received several music honors and has even appeared in an episode of HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm. Kim will perform Jean Sibelius Violin Concerto, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 and more. There will be performances Friday, Nov. 1 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 3 at 3 p.m in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students, please call 214-768-ARTS for more information.

October 29, 2013|Calendar Highlights|

Meadows Symphony Orchestra kicks off 2013-14 season

The 2013-14 season of the Meadows Symphony Orchestra kicks off this weekend. MSO will perform Friday, Sept. 27 at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center and Sunday, Sept. 29 at 3 p.m. at Dallas City Performance Hall.

paul-phillips-and-meadows-orchestra

MSO via SMU

The program consists of 20th-century works; opening with Einojuhani Rautavaara’s 1995 Isle of Bliss and follows with works by Maurice Ravel and Maduel de Falla. Sunday’s off-campus performance is part of the Meadows School’s new community concert series.

“SMU Meadows School of the Arts is transporting its art and music into the community as part of the new Meadows Community Series, which will present five events in diverse venues throughout Dallas over the fall and spring semesters,” a recent article explained. Tickets for this weekend’s performance are $7 for faculty, staff and students.

Just in time for opening weekend, it has been announced that the Preston Peak family gifted Meadows $2 million to establish the Martha Raley Peak Endowed Centennial Chair and Director of the Meadows Symphony Orchestra.

Martha Raley Peak is a musician, arts leader and patron. Mrs. Peak graduated from SMU in 1950 and was a member of the symphony, chorus and music fraternities as a student.

Maestro Paul Phillips will be the first holder of the chair. Phillips graduated from SMU on 1974 and joined the faculty in 1996.

Martha Raley Peak via SMU

Martha Raley Peak via SMU

“Music teaches discernment, dedication, and attention to detail. It impacts the ways our brain develop and function and is a universal language. I am thrilled to support the training of young student musicians by endowing the position,” Peak told SMU in a recent article.

The $2 million gift counts toward the $1 billion goal of SMU Unbridled: The Second Century Campaign, which to date, has raised more than $780 million.

September 27, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Meadows kicks off new community performance series in 2013-14

Meadows Symphony OrchestraSMU’s Meadows School of the Arts is transporting its art and music into the community as part of a new “Meadows Community Series,” which will present five events in diverse venues throughout Dallas over the fall and spring semesters.

The series launches with a concert by the Meadows Wind Ensemble at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13 in the new Dallas City Performance Hall. Other offerings will include concerts by the Meadows Symphony Orchestra and Meadows choirs, a creative take on Shakespeare at NorthPark Center, and a dance performance and children’s creative movement class at Klyde Warren Park.

The new series is part of Meadows’ ongoing initiative to engage the community with art, music, theatre, dance and more. Sam Holland, professor and director of the Division of Music at Meadows, says the series is about more than showcasing talented Meadows performers in new city locales; it’s also about inviting the audience members to have an aesthetic experience.

“People don’t come to concerts to learn something, or to be edified, or to be in the presence of greatness,” says Holland. “They come to feel something, to be moved by something greater than themselves. That is what the aesthetic experience is, and that is what we want to provide.”

Three of the events are ticketed, and two are free. Ticket prices range from $7-$13 and may be purchased at the door or online in advance at Vendini.com. For more information contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

> Find a full schedule of Meadows Community Series events at SMU News

September 11, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Meadows Opera Theatre performs Albert Herring Feb. 7-10, 2013

It is time for the annual May Day Festival, but what happens when none of the girls are pure enough to be May Queen?

In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the birth of composer Benjamin Britten, the Meadows Opera Theatre and Meadows Symphony Orchestra will perform Britten’s comic opera Albert Herring. The production runs Feb. 7-10, 2013 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

Albert Herring is set in 1947, just two years after the end of World War II, in a time when youth were trying to pull away from traditions and live life in their own terms. This theme is explored through the title character, who is named May King after being lauded as the only virgin in town. Albert is embarrassed by his new title and seeks adventure and independence from his mother after unknowingly drinking rum-spiked lemonade at the May Day Festival. The opera is a story of triumph and having the right to be who we really are regardless of what others think and accept.

The opera was first performed in 1947, with a libretto by Eric Crozier. Meadows Opera Theatre Director Hank Hammett had the privilege of studying with Crozier in his younger years, and they became good friends. “Eric and Nancy (Eric’s wife) fell in love during the writing of the opera,” Hammett says, “and that love is very much reflected in the music that Britten wrote for Nancy’s character. Nancy is one of the individuals who spikes the lemonade.”

Meadows student Julie Dieltz, playing Lady Billows, says, “Performing in an opera is one of the most exciting and terrifying experiences I’ve had. One must rely on specific personal experiences in order to develop a character. Through research into one’s life, the life of the character, and into history, the character comes alive.”

A unique element of Meadows Opera Theatre productions is that they are each fully designed by third-year M.F.A. students from the Division of Theatre. All sets, costumes and lighting are specially created by Meadows production, something that sets Meadows apart from other universities.

“This year’s production has surpassed them all. We are so fortunate to be surrounded by this kind of collaborative, interdisciplinary talent,” Hammett says.

First-time opera performer Daniel Bouchard, playing Mr. Gedge, also noted the collaborative nature of Meadows. “The true beauty of opera is that it is a collaborative art, bringing extremely talented musicians together on stage and in the pit to tell a story. Cooperation between these talented artists can be difficult sometimes, but we have worked so hard together that this interaction is almost second nature now.”

The Meadows Symphony Orchestra will be in the pit under the direction of Professor of Music and Director of Orchestral Activities Paul Phillips. The opera will be sung in English, with projected English text above the stage as well.

Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. The show begins at 8 p.m. Feb. 7-9 and 2 p.m. Feb. 10. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

(All images by Brian Hwu c/o Meadows School of the Arts)

Find a complete cast list below the cut.

(more…)

February 6, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 29, 2013

From Print to Icon/Icon to Print: On Thursday, Jan. 31, the Comini Lecture Series will explore the visual connections and identity of Mount Sinai and the Monastery of St. Catherine. During the 16th century, images and print media helped to promote the Sinai monastery as a strong focus of Christian pilgrimage and transform it to an iconic place. Kristine Larison, Tufts Fellow and Adjunct Lecturer of Art History, will speak on “Replicating Sacred Space at Sinai” at 5:30 p.m. in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. This lecture is free and open to the public; call 214-768-2698 for more information.

Memoirs and history: The SMU Center for Presidential History invites you to a lecture on The Evolving Story of the George W. Bush Administration. On Friday, Feb. 2Melvin Leffler will speak on the foreign policies of the George W. Bush administration, specifically the complexities of American foreign policy in the pre- and post-9/11 world. Two of Dr. Leffler’s books, For the Soul of Mankind and In Uncertain Times, will be available for purchasing and signing at the lecture. The lecture starts at 5 p.m. in the Jones Great Hall of the Meadows Museum. This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

MSO: The Meadows Symphony Orchestra kicks off their Spring Term season on Friday, Feb. 1. The weekend performances will feature winners of the annual Meadows Concerto Competition, including student conductors Eldred Marshall, Jonathan Moore and Parisa Zaeri and soloists Daniel Hawkins on horn and Rebecca Roose singing soprano. The concert starts at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1 and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students.

(Image via SMU Center For Presidential History)

January 29, 2013|Calendar Highlights|
Load More Posts