Meadows School of the Arts

Meadows Theatre presents In the Blood through Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017

In the Blood poster art 2017The SMU Meadows Theatre season begins with a new production of a Pulitzer Prize finalist that reimagines an American literary classic in a modern setting. Professor of Theatre Rhonda Blair directs Suzan-Lori Parks’ In the Blood , running through Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 in the Margo Jones Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

Parks conceived In the Blood as a retelling of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, with Hester as a single mother living in poverty with her five children. As she struggles to support them, she decides to seek help from their various fathers, with tragic consequences.

The playwright has won awards and honors including a MacArthur “Genius” Grant, a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Tony Award; in 2002, she became the first African-American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama. In the Blood, which premiered in 1999, was a Pulitzer finalist.

Showtimes are 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, with 2 p.m. matinees Saturday-Sunday. Tickets are $8 for SMU faculty, staff and students. Arrive early – there will be no late seating.

For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

> Buy tickets online from Vendini.com

SMU Meadows’ Ignite/Arts and Cara Mía Theatre Co. explore lives of DREAMers in Deferred Action Sept. 14-17, 2017

Rehearsal still photo from Deferred ActionSMU Meadows School of the Arts’ Ignite/Arts Dallas initiative, with co-presenter Cara Mía Theatre Co., will launch a touring version of an acclaimed play on the urgent topic of immigration and the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals (DACA) program, originally produced and premiered at Dallas Theater Center in 2016.

Deferred Action by David Lozano and Lee Trull will begin its tour in North Texas with four performances at the Meadows School’s Bob Hope Theatre, Sept. 14-17. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for seniors, and $8 for SMU students, faculty and staff, and are available online at caramiatheatre.org.

Tickets will also be available through the Cara Mía box office in the Hope Theatre lobby one hour before each performance.

The play’s central character is Javier Mejía, one of the immigrants known as DREAMers who arrived in the United States as an undocumented minor. Now, after years in the States, he finds himself caught in the tangle of existing immigration laws, new presidential policies and the harsh reality of living in the shadows. Javier hopes that temporary administrative mechanisms like Deferred Action will be the answer to his dilemma. But will hope be snatched away? Can politicians who say they are the DREAMers’ friends be trusted?

Co-author Lozano is Cara Mía executive artistic director, and Trull serves as Dallas Theater Center’s director of new play development. The touring version is directed by Lozano and features Cara Mía actors and other local and national professional performers.

Subsequent performancers are scheduled at the University of North Texas in Denton, the Latino Cultural Center in Dallas, Talento Bilingüe de Houston and the Encuentro de las Americas International Theatre Festival in Los Angeles. The touring production, the first ever undertaken by Cara Mía, was commissioned by Ignite/Arts Dallas and is sponsored by the Dallas-based Latino Center for Leadership Development.

On Saturday, Sept. 16 at 4:30 p.m., a free Community Conversation event will be held in the Bob Hope Theatre to discuss issues raised in the play. The event, sponsored by the Embrey Family Foundation, will feature a panel and open discussion with members of Cara Mía Theatre about the lives of DREAMers, immigration reform, and current national, state and local policies surrounding undocumented immigrants. Attendees are invited to stay afterward for a complimentary meal provided by Chipotle.

Admission to the Community Conversation is free, and no reservations are required.

> Read the full story at the SMU Meadows School of the Arts website

Joaquín Achúcarro to present rare solo concert Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, in SMU’s Caruth Auditorium

Joaquin Achucarro 300pxThe Distinguished Performer Concert Series opens its 2017-18 season with a rare solo recital by world-renowned concert pianist, recording artist and Joel Estes Tate Professor Joaquín Achúcarro. The concert is dedicated to the memory of Jeanne Roach Johnson ’54, longtime friend of Meadows School of the Arts.

The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 1, 2017 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Admission is $14 for adults, $11 for seniors, and $8 for SMU students, faculty and staff. Tickets are available from the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS), or online: bit.ly/AchucarroConcert.

The all-Chopin concert will feature six works by the 19th-century Romantic composer, including his Prelude, Op. 45 in C-sharp minor; Fantasia Impromptu; Nocturne, Op. Posth. in C-sharp minor; Barcarolle, Op. 60; Polonaise, Op. 53 in A-flat major; and, after an intermission, 24 Preludes, Op. 28. Following the concert, Achúcarro will fly to London to record these Chopin works for a new CD.

> In Memoriam: Dallas civic leader, SMU benefactor Jeanne Roach Johnson

The late Jeanne Roach Johnson (1932-2017) – Dallas civic leader, investor and philanthropist – was a longtime supporter of SMU and of the Meadows School. A lifelong music lover, she gave several major gifts to establish endowment funds and initiatives for Meadows piano programs.

“Whether they know it or not, Jeanne Johnson’s legacy of philanthropy at the Meadows School has touched virtually every single music student for the last 20 years,” said Meadows Dean Samuel Holland. “The impact of her giving included a complete renovation of the music practice room complex, new and refurbished Steinway pianos, and scholarships for deserving students – not to mention a major gift to the National Center for Arts Research.

“Over many years, in part because of her love for the piano, Jeanne and our distinguished artist-in-residence, Joaquín Achúcarro, developed a warm and wonderful relationship. Jeanne was seen at virtually every piano event at the Meadows School and eagerly followed the careers of Joaquín’s students and alumni. I can’t imagine a more fitting tribute for this great lady than for Achúcarro to dedicate this recital – of repertoire Jeanne particularly loved – to her memory and her legacy.”

In October 2015, the French magazine Diapason selected Achúcarro’s BMG-RCA recording of Bernard Herrmann’s Concerto Macabre for Piano and Orchestra with London’s National Philharmonic Orchestra as one of “The Best 100 Piano Recordings of All Time,” along with such legends as Rachmaninoff, Horowitz and Rubinstein. He has even had a planet named after him: The International Astronomical Union christened the miniplanet 22191 “Achúcarro” in his honor.

Since winning the 1959 Liverpool International Competition, Achúcarro has toured 61 countries and played in venues such as Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, Berlin Philharmonie, Royal Albert Hall and Sydney Opera House. He has performed with more than 200 major orchestras, from the New York, Los Angeles and London Philharmonics to La Scala of Milan and the Tokyo Symphony. He has also played with more than 350 conductors, including Claudio Abbado, Zubin Mehta, Sir Yehudi Menuhin, Seiji Ozawa and Sir Simon Rattle.

He has also received the highest honors in the arts bestowed in his native Spain: the Gold Medal of Fine Arts, The National Award for Music and the Great Cross of Civil Merit.

> Read the full story at the SMU Meadows homepage

Acts of Aggression at SMU’s Pollock Gallery showcases contemporary Guatemalan artists, Sept. 9-Oct. 14, 2017

Manuel Chavajay, Oq Ximtali, 2017 video performance, 400px

Manuel Chavajay, Oq Ximtali, from a 2017 video performance. Image courtesy the artist & Galería EXTRA.

SMU’s Pollock Gallery will present objects, images, texts and social projects by 11 contemporary artists from Guatemala in a new exhibition, Acts of Aggression: An Exhibition About Community. The show runs Sept. 9-Oct. 14, 2017.

Working 20 years after the official end of Guatemala’s civil war, the artists in Acts of Aggression “navigate the reconciliation of historic brutality with ongoing violence, challenge political amnesia, care for themselves and others, and build strategies for working through and around disastrous systemic failures,” according to a press release for the exhibition. Participating artists include Hellen Ascoli, Esvin Alarcón Lam, Edgar Calel, Manuel Chavajay Moralez, Margarita Figueroa, Jorge de León, Reyes Josué Morales, Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa, Gabriel Rodríguez Pellecer, Mario Santizo and Inés Verdugo.

Curator Laura A. L. Wellen will offer a walk-through during an opening reception from 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 9. The exhibit’s closing day, Saturday, Oct. 14, will feature a talk from 3-5 p.m. with Wellen, Meadows Division of Art Chair James Sullivan, and artists Hellen Ascoli and Reyes Josué Morales.

The exhibition is accompanied by a bilingual (English/Spanish) catalog.

Acts of Aggression exhibit 400pxWellen holds a Ph.D. degree in art history and is a 2017 recipient of the Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant for her website. She is also a 2017-18 Core Program Critic-in-Residence at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Since 2014, she has been working between Houston and Guatemala City, where she runs the apartment gallery and artist residency Yvonne. Her writing has been published in ArtForum, Art Lies, Artishock, Art Review, Arts + Culture Texas and Pastelegram, among other international publications.

The Pollock Gallery is operated by the Division of Art in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts and is located on the first floor of the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. Gallery hours are 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 1-5 p.m. Saturday. The gallery is closed Sunday and Monday. Admission is free.

For more information, call 214-768-4439 or visit the Pollock Gallery online.

Eighteen SMU professors receive tenure, promotion for 2017-18

Eighteen outstanding SMU faculty members will begin the 2017-18 academic year with new tenure as associate professors or promotion to full professorships.

The following individuals have received tenure or promotion effective Friday, Sept. 1, 2017:

Cox School of Business

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Stanimir Markov, Accounting

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Karisa Cloward, Political Science
  • Erin Hochman, History
  • Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology
  • Benno Rumpf, Mathematics
  • Jayson Sae-Saue, English
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Recommended for tenure (associate professorship previously awarded):

  • Barry Lee, Mathematics

Dedman School of Law

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Chris Jenks, Law (autonomous weapons, military law, national security law, evidence, criminal law, international law, human rights)

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Thomas Wm. Mayo, Law (bioethics, election law, health law, nonprofit/tax-exempt organizations)
  • Meghan J. Ryan, Law (law and science, torts, criminal law, criminal procedure, death penalty, actual innocence)
  • Joshua C. Tate, Law (legal history, trusts and estates, property)

Meadows School of the Arts

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Archie Cummings, Theatre
  • Amy Freund, Art History
  • Jon Hackler, Theatre
  • Peter Kupfer, Music (Musicology)
  • Brian Molanphy, Art

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Carol Leone, Music (Piano)

Eighteen SMU faculty members retire with emeritus status in 2016-17

Eighteen distinguished faculty members with a combined total of nearly 585 years of SMU service retired with emeritus status in the 2016-17 academic year.

The professors, and their dates of service:

• Thomas E. Barry, Professor Emeritus of Marketing, Cox School of Business, 1970-2017

• Janis Bergman-Carton, Professor Emerita of Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, 1991-2017

Edward Biehl, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1962-2017

Gordon Birrell, Professor Emeritus of World Languages and Literatures, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1974-2017

Dolores M. Etter, Professor Emerita of Electrical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, 2008-2016

 Richard F. Gunst, Professor Emeritus of Statistical Science, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1971-2017

 C. Michael Hawn, University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1992-2017

• Debora Hunter, Professor Emerita of Art, Meadows School of the Arts, 1976-2017

Alireza Khotanzad, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, 1984-2017

 Ndiva Kofele-Kale, Professor Emeritus of Law, Dedman School of Law, 1989-2017

• Robert Krout, Professor Emeritus of Music, Meadows School of the Arts, 2004-2017

• Patricia Mathes, Texas Instruments Chair of Reading and Professor Emerita of Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, 2003-2017

 Sherry L. Smith, University Distinguished Professor Emerita of History, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1999-2017

 Willard Spiegelman, Hughes Professor Emeritus of English, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1971-2017

 Steve Sverdlik, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1982-2017

• Martin Sweidel, Professor Emeritus of Music, Meadows School of the Arts, 1986-2016

 John Walther, Professor Emeritus of Earth Sciences, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1994-2017

 Ronald Wetherington, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1964-2017

Three professors honored with 2017 Tunks Distinguished University Citizen Awards

Three faculty members were honored with SMU’s 2017 Thomas W. Tunks Distinguished University Citizen Award at the Faculty Breakfast held Saturday, May 20 before Commencement. This year’s recipients are:

The award, given by the Office of the Provost, honors three faculty members each year for service and activities that benefit students and the University’s academic mission and “who have demonstrated outstanding citizenship through dedicated service to the University and its governance.”

Formerly the Distinguished University Citizen Award, the honor was renamed in 2014 for Tunks, a professor of music education, former associate provost and founding Faculty-in-Residence in the University’s Residential Commons.

Perkins School of Theology announces degree concentrations in Church Management, Social Innovation to begin in Fall 2017

SMU Perkins Chapel with blue foxgloves, 2015, by Hillsman S. Jackson - LRSMU’s Perkins School of Theology has added two new degree concentrations – in partnership with Cox School of Business and Meadows School of the Arts – designed to strengthen future clergy in the area of church management and to equip those pursuing nontraditional forms of ministry that encourage social innovation.

The Church Management and Social Innovation and Nonprofit Engagement (SINE) concentrations will be available beginning Fall 2017 to Master of Divinity (M.Div.) and Master of Arts in Ministry (M.A.M.) students.

The Concentration in Church Management is an 18-credit-hour interdisciplinary graduate-level concentration that will provide world-class business education to students in tandem with critical theological preparation. Courses offered by the Cox School, which was ranked No. 6 globally for quality of faculty in 2016, will focus on the needs of nonprofit managers in areas including organizational leadership, staff and volunteer management, membership generation, cross-cultural management and targeted marketing.

“This concentration is both badly needed and highly distinctive,” said Perkins Dean Craig Hill. “It leverages SMU’s considerable strengths in both theological and business education to provide a program that addresses needs of church bodies in an efficient and cost-effective manner.”

Offered in partnership with the Meadows School’s Division of Corporate Communication and Public Affairs, the Concentration in Social Innovation and Nonprofit Engagement is designed primarily for students who do not intend to work as pastors in a local church setting, but in nontraditional ministries. The 15-credit-hour interdisciplinary graduate-level concentration will focus on innovative approaches to addressing social issues and the needs arising from technological, demographic and societal changes. Through courses including social entrepreneurship and innovation, business and professional communication, financing for the social good, and others, students will learn how to form effective, practical and sustainable responses to these emerging challenges.

“Perkins students enrolled in the Social Innovation and Nonprofit Management concentration will be able to apply intellectual rigor and spiritual integrity to communication theory, and to practice research, strategy, consulting and advocacy in light of critical theological inquiry,” Dean Hill said. “Many of our students, including those who pursue ordination, find themselves on the cutting-edge of nontraditional ministries within communities across the United States. Perkins and Meadows are committed to equipping leaders not only for current societal realities but also to face future challenges.”

“Students receiving a theological education with either of these concentrations will be better prepared to lead churches, non-profits, and other ministry settings,” said Bishop Michael McKee, episcopal leader of the North Texas Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church, member of the SMU Board of Trustees and chair of the Perkins Executive Board. “SMU and Perkins will be providing a better-prepared person for service in our rapidly changing culture.”

> Read the full story at the Perkins School of Theology website

Meadows shares spectacular ‘Photos We Love’ from Spring 2017

Promo shot for Meadows Senior Dance Concert 2017

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts chooses the photos that sum up Spring 2017 – including spectacular shots from the Meadows Chamber Music Recital, the Meadows Opera production of The Elixir of Love, Regina Taylor’s Magnolia, the Temerlin Advertising Institute and Division of Journalism “Collaboration Room,” and the August Wilson Monologue Competition.

They also include the photo above – a stunning shot by Ace Anderson from the promotional video shoot for the Meadows 2017 Senior Dance Concert, running May 4-7 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

Inner Life: SMU Senior Dance Concert 2017 from Ace Anderson on Vimeo.

> Find more “Photos We Love” at the Meadows School of the Arts website camera, slide show icon

Meadows School of the Arts presents “Meadows at the Meyerson” April 12, 2017

Meadows at the MeyersonSMU’s Meadows School of the Arts brings out its best to honor community leader Don Glendenning during “Meadows at the Meyerson 2017.” The 24th annual benefit concert will take place at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 12 in the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, 2301 Flora St. in Dallas.

The program features works by Ravel, Fauré and Delibes, performed by the Meadows Symphony Orchestra under the direction of conductor Paul Phillips. Also performing will be women of the Meadows choral ensembles, led by director Pamela Elrod Huffman, and operatic soloist and alumna Katrina Galka.

The event supports talented Meadows students through the Meadows Scholars Program and the newly established Diane and Hal Brierley Endowed Scholarship. The annual spring concert also honors a community leader; Glendenning, this year’s honoree, is a noted arts and civic patron. The 2017 event chair is Nancy Carlson and the honorary chairs are Diane and Hal Brierley.

Program highlights include:

  • La Valse, a “choreographic poem for orchestra” by Maurice Ravel
  • “L’Air des clochettes” (The Bell Song) from the opera Lakmé by Leo Delibes, featuring award-winning soprano and Meadows alumna Katrina Galka as guest soloist
  • Prelude to Pénélope and Pavane, Op. 50 by Gabriel Fauré, the latter featuring the women of the Meadows School’s three principal choral ensembles – the Meadows Chorale, Meadows Concert Choir and Diva Dolce
  • Ravel’s Suite No. 2 from Daphnis et Chloé, originally composed for Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes.

Tickets are $17 for students and SMU faculty and staff. A $10 discount is available for subscribers. For more information, contact the Meadows Box Office at 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

> Read the full story from the SMU Meadows website

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