Meadows School of the Arts

David Baldwin discusses ‘Navigating the Belief Economy’ in Temerlin Advertising Institute’s ExxonMobil Lecture Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018

David BaldwinTo reach the next generation of customers, brands must address those customers’ beliefs and ethical concerns, says David Baldwin. The ad man, author and filmmaker is guest speaker for the 2018 ExxonMobil Lecture on advertising, media and communication ethics, sponsored by SMU’s Temerlin Advertising Institute in Meadows School of the Arts.

Navigating the Belief Economy” will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 6, at the Angelika Film Center in Mockingbird Station, Dallas, followed by a Q&A. A reception and networking event will be held before the lecture from 6-7 p.m. in the Angelika lobby. The event is free, but reservations are requested via Eventbrite.

An award-winning copywriter and creative director, Baldwin is the founder of Baldwin&, a Raleigh, North Carolina-based advertising agency that was named Small Agency of the Year twice in its first five years by AdAge and the American Association of Advertising Agencies. Baldwin and his work have been recognized by The One Show, the Cannes Festival, D&AD, the Clios, the Effies, the Andy Awards, the MPA Kelly Awards, Communication Arts and more. His work and writings have been featured in numerous publications and college textbooks on advertising.

Baldwin was an executive producer for the Emmy-winning film Art & Copy and an associate producer for the Emmy and Peabody Award-winning film The Loving Story. In addition, he has written an acclaimed new book, The Belief Economy: How to Give a Damn, Stop Selling, and Create Buy-In (Lioncrest Publishing, October 2017). He will share his insights about how the Belief Economy lays the foundation needed to connect with a socially committed audience.

The former chairman of The One Club in New York City, Baldwin is also cofounder and brandmaster of the Ponysaurus Brewing Co. in Durham, makers of “the beer beer would drink if beer could drink beer.”

The ExxonMobil Lecture Series launched in 2003 to promote advertising, media and corporate ethics. ExxonMobil has endowed the lecture series through a grant to SMU’s Temerlin Advertising Institute. The grant supports SMU’s goal of expanding its emphasis on ethics not only in its diverse communications programs but in events offered to the public.

For more information, contact the Temerlin Advertising Institute at 214-768-1878.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Three outstanding professors honored at 2018 Spring General Faculty Meeting

Provost Steven Currall presented teaching awards to three outstanding faculty members at SMU’s 2018 Spring Faculty Meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 24.

Stephanie Langin-Hooper, assistant professor of art history and Karl Kilinski II Endowed Chair of Hellenic Visual Culture in Meadows School of the Arts, received the 2016-17 Golden Mustang Faculty Award. The Golden Mustang honors junior faculty members who sustain high achievement as both teachers and scholars and supports teaching and curriculum development on the part of younger faculty members.

The 2016-17 President’s Associates Outstanding Faculty Award was presented to Scott L. Davis, associate professor of applied physiology and wellness in Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. The award honors tenured faculty who have sustained high achievement as both teachers and scholars in their professions.

James Hart, professor of practice and interim chair of arts management and arts entrepreneurship in Meadows School of the Arts, received the Provost’s Teaching Recognition Award. The award honors full-time, non-tenure-track faculty members who demonstrate a commitment to excellence and a consummate dedication to teaching and learning.

Books for giving (and keeping), created by the SMU community

2017 SMU books

Looking for last-minute gifts? Cherri Gann of SMU News compiles an annual list featuring books published in 2017 by the SMU community – including faculty, staff, alumni, libraries and museum.

This collection always has something for everyone, whether their reading preferences are light or serious, ranging from nonfiction to novels and from scholarly to children’s titles. Some selections are available at the SMU Bookstore, and most are available via online booksellers.

Find the full list under the cut.

> See all the books and their covers at SMU News

(more…)

25 SMU professors receive 2018-19 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Twenty-five SMU faculty members have received 2018-19 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research, “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, by college or school:

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

  • Jing Cao, Statistical Science

  • Simon Dalley, Physics

  • Alan Elliott, Statistical Science

  • Jo Guldi, History

  • Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology

  • Priscilla Lui, Psychology

  • Karen Lupo, Anthropology

  • Alicia Meuret, Psychology

  • Thomas Ritz, Psychology

  • Peng Tao, Chemistry

  • Hervé Tchumkam, World Languages and Literatures

  • Jingbo Ye, Physics

Meadows School of the Arts

  • Amber Bemak, Film and Media Studies

  • LaShonda Eaddy, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs

  • Amy Freund, Art History

  • Yan Huang, Advertising

  • Anna Kim, Advertising

  • Zachary Wallmark, Music

  • Hye Jin Yoon, Advertising

Lyle School of Engineering

  • Ali Heydari, Mechanical Engineering

  • MinJun Kim, Mechanical Engineering

  • Jaewook Myung, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Perkins School of Theology

  • Jack Levison, Old Testament Interpretation

  • Natalia Marandiuc, Christian Theology

  • Priscilla Pope-Levison, Ministerial Studies

Meadows Fall Dance Concert 2017 runs Nov. 8-12 in Bob Hope Theatre

Bolero by Christopher Dolder, photo by Paul Phillips

Scene from Bolero by Christopher Dolder, SMU Meadows Fall Dance Concert 2017. Photo credit: Paul Phillips

Three contemporary works, including newly created pieces by Complexions Ballet co-founders Dwight Rhoden and Desmond Richardson and by Associate Professor Christopher Dolder, are highlights of the Meadows School of the Arts’ Fall Dance Concert. The show runs Nov. 8-12, 2017 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

The program will open with Dolder’s new version of Bolero, set to a London Symphony recording of Ravel’s famous work. An interactive set featuring a circular stage space, curving ramps and central spire provide the physical backdrop for dancers representing an array of societal archetypes perennially caught in the cycles of life and culture. Dolder, a former soloist with the Martha Graham Dance Company, has previously expressed a fascination for architectural design in productions of His Handle (2014), Metropolis (2015) and a collaboration with Canadian wood sculptor Erik More in The Orca Project (2016).

Ascension is a new piece created by Visiting Artists-in-Residence Richardson and Rhoden, featuring a blend of ballet and contemporary dance expressed in sculptural choreography. Complexions Ballet has received numerous honors, including The New York Times Critics’ Choice Award, and has performed at Lincoln Center and The Joyce Theater in New York, the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, and most recently at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., as part of “Ballet Across America.”  Celebrated for his choreography and wide-ranging collaborations with well-known dance artists, Rhoden has created over 80 ballets for Complexions and for numerous other major companies. Richardson is a Tony-nominated actor and the first black American principal dancer of American Ballet Theatre.

Drop Me Off in Harlem by Moncell Durden Fall Dance 2017 photo by Paul Phillips

Scene from Drop Me Off in Harlem by Moncell Durden, SMU Meadows Fall Dance Concert 2017. Photo credit: Paul Phillips

Concluding the program is Moncell Durden’s Drop Me Off in Harlem, a tribute to the music and dance of the 1930s. Premiered earlier this year, it uses vernacular jazz movement to recount the adventures of three ladies from Pennsylvania who travel to New York City to dance at the famous Savoy Ballroom and watch the battle of the bands between Benny Goodman and Chick Webb. The audience follows Norma, Mabel and Dawn as they navigate the spirited streets, subways and ballrooms of New York and Harlem nightlife. Durden is a choreographer, historian, dance educator and current faculty member at the University of Southern California, where he teaches jazz, hip-hop and improvisation.

Fall Dance Concert performance times are 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $14 for adults, $11 for seniors and $8 for students, SMU faculty and staff.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit the Meadows website or call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

— Written by Victoria Winkelman

> Buy Meadows Fall Dance Concert tickets online at Vendini

Enjoy this gallery of photos by Paul Phillips from Fall Dance Concert rehearsal. camera, slide show icon

Leading First Amendment lawyer Bruce Sanford to discuss “Trusting the Media in the Age of Trump” at SMU

Bruce SanfordSMU’s 2017 Rosine Smith Sammons Lecture in Media Ethics features one of the nation’s most influential media lawyers in a discussion of the state of the First Amendment, news, and fairness in today’s politically charged news environment.

Bruce Sanford, a partner in BakerHostetler in Washington, D.C., will speak on “Trusting the Media in the Age of Trump” at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. The event is free, and tickets are not required.

Mentioned in The National Law Journal’s list of the 100 most influential lawyers in America (1991), and described by American Journalism Review as one of the most accomplished press lawyers in the nation, Sanford maintains a national practice as a partner in the law firm BakerHostetler, Washington, D.C. His work focuses on representing high-profile clients in cutting-edge and complex matters, frequently with high-stakes public affairs considerations.

Sanford represented President Clinton in the negotiation of a book contract, and first lady Barbara Bush and author John Grisham in libel and copyright cases, respectively. He also serves as general counsel to the Society of Professional Journalists, the largest and oldest organization of journalists in the United States, on Capitol Hill and in Washington.

He is the author of a leading treatise on libel and privacy law, Libel and Privacy (2nd edition 2004), as well as the 2000 best-seller Don’t Shoot the Messenger: How Our Growing Hatred of the Media Threatens Free Speech for All of Us.

The Sammons Lecture Series is presented by the Division of Journalism in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

> Read more from SMU News

Mary Vernon Painting Prize honors longtime art professor, helps launch young artists’ careers

Nicolas Gonzalez and Mary Vernon

Nicolás González and Mary Vernon

Mary Vernon plans to retire in May 2018, and Meadows School of the Arts wanted to create a fitting honor for the longtime art and art history professor. In 2016, along with a group of donors, the School established the Mary Vernon Painting Prize to help launch the careers of top art students.

Now, Meadows seeks to endow the prize fund in perpetuity, so that it can continue to help students establish their careers in the art world.

The School has set a goal of $100,000 or more to endow the annual award – presented to an undergraduate painter with the best body of work in the year, as judged by faculty. When fully vested, the endowment fund will generate $5,000 annually to be awarded to one or more promising art students.

To date, more than $60,000 has been secured toward the goal. An anonymous donor has offered to match dollar-for-dollar the next $20,000 in new gifts to help achieve or surpass the funding goal.

“In spring 2016, Mary told me it was time to transcend from an art student into an emerging artist,” says Nicolás González ’17, the prize’s first recipient. “She told me to invest my passion and time with painting materials that are rich in pigment and surfaces that are delicate to the touch. She said, ‘Let the world know that you are a painter, a serious painter, who knows how to paint.’”

The Mary Vernon Painting Prize has enabled González to purchase higher-quality painting supplies such as oils, Yupo paper, linen fabric and  brush script liners, he says. “Through these specific materials, my abilities as a painter have greatly expanded. They have allowed me to have a better understanding that the quality of the painting surface and the type of paint are very important.”

Vernon, says González, taught him to be brave and to persevere. “She encouraged me to never give up within the world of the arts,” he says. “There were times when I just wanted to throw in the towel, but every time, Mary seemed to always appear as a glowing light within the shadows of my fear. She would always encourage me to be better, to always do my best, and tell me that doors would always open as long as I turned the key. She said, ‘You already possess the key. It’s in your heart and soul, it speaks through your work. As long as you keep trying, doors will always open.’

“Mary Vernon is someone very special to this world and a true master of the arts and its history. Her love for the arts and her students is equal to none. I am so grateful to have Mary Vernon as my mentor, professor and true friend whom I hold close to my heart.”

— Written by Mary Guthrie

> Read the full story from the SMU Meadows homepage

Meadows Theatre presents In the Blood through Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017

In the Blood poster art 2017The SMU Meadows Theatre season begins with a new production of a Pulitzer Prize finalist that reimagines an American literary classic in a modern setting. Professor of Theatre Rhonda Blair directs Suzan-Lori Parks’ In the Blood , running through Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 in the Margo Jones Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

Parks conceived In the Blood as a retelling of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, with Hester as a single mother living in poverty with her five children. As she struggles to support them, she decides to seek help from their various fathers, with tragic consequences.

The playwright has won awards and honors including a MacArthur “Genius” Grant, a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Tony Award; in 2002, she became the first African-American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama. In the Blood, which premiered in 1999, was a Pulitzer finalist.

Showtimes are 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, with 2 p.m. matinees Saturday-Sunday. Tickets are $8 for SMU faculty, staff and students. Arrive early – there will be no late seating.

For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

> Buy tickets online from Vendini.com

SMU Meadows’ Ignite/Arts and Cara Mía Theatre Co. explore lives of DREAMers in Deferred Action Sept. 14-17, 2017

Rehearsal still photo from Deferred ActionSMU Meadows School of the Arts’ Ignite/Arts Dallas initiative, with co-presenter Cara Mía Theatre Co., will launch a touring version of an acclaimed play on the urgent topic of immigration and the Deferred Action for Child Arrivals (DACA) program, originally produced and premiered at Dallas Theater Center in 2016.

Deferred Action by David Lozano and Lee Trull will begin its tour in North Texas with four performances at the Meadows School’s Bob Hope Theatre, Sept. 14-17. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for seniors, and $8 for SMU students, faculty and staff, and are available online at caramiatheatre.org.

Tickets will also be available through the Cara Mía box office in the Hope Theatre lobby one hour before each performance.

The play’s central character is Javier Mejía, one of the immigrants known as DREAMers who arrived in the United States as an undocumented minor. Now, after years in the States, he finds himself caught in the tangle of existing immigration laws, new presidential policies and the harsh reality of living in the shadows. Javier hopes that temporary administrative mechanisms like Deferred Action will be the answer to his dilemma. But will hope be snatched away? Can politicians who say they are the DREAMers’ friends be trusted?

Co-author Lozano is Cara Mía executive artistic director, and Trull serves as Dallas Theater Center’s director of new play development. The touring version is directed by Lozano and features Cara Mía actors and other local and national professional performers.

Subsequent performancers are scheduled at the University of North Texas in Denton, the Latino Cultural Center in Dallas, Talento Bilingüe de Houston and the Encuentro de las Americas International Theatre Festival in Los Angeles. The touring production, the first ever undertaken by Cara Mía, was commissioned by Ignite/Arts Dallas and is sponsored by the Dallas-based Latino Center for Leadership Development.

On Saturday, Sept. 16 at 4:30 p.m., a free Community Conversation event will be held in the Bob Hope Theatre to discuss issues raised in the play. The event, sponsored by the Embrey Family Foundation, will feature a panel and open discussion with members of Cara Mía Theatre about the lives of DREAMers, immigration reform, and current national, state and local policies surrounding undocumented immigrants. Attendees are invited to stay afterward for a complimentary meal provided by Chipotle.

Admission to the Community Conversation is free, and no reservations are required.

> Read the full story at the SMU Meadows School of the Arts website

Joaquín Achúcarro to present rare solo concert Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, in SMU’s Caruth Auditorium

Joaquin Achucarro 300pxThe Distinguished Performer Concert Series opens its 2017-18 season with a rare solo recital by world-renowned concert pianist, recording artist and Joel Estes Tate Professor Joaquín Achúcarro. The concert is dedicated to the memory of Jeanne Roach Johnson ’54, longtime friend of Meadows School of the Arts.

The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 1, 2017 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Admission is $14 for adults, $11 for seniors, and $8 for SMU students, faculty and staff. Tickets are available from the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS), or online: bit.ly/AchucarroConcert.

The all-Chopin concert will feature six works by the 19th-century Romantic composer, including his Prelude, Op. 45 in C-sharp minor; Fantasia Impromptu; Nocturne, Op. Posth. in C-sharp minor; Barcarolle, Op. 60; Polonaise, Op. 53 in A-flat major; and, after an intermission, 24 Preludes, Op. 28. Following the concert, Achúcarro will fly to London to record these Chopin works for a new CD.

> In Memoriam: Dallas civic leader, SMU benefactor Jeanne Roach Johnson

The late Jeanne Roach Johnson (1932-2017) – Dallas civic leader, investor and philanthropist – was a longtime supporter of SMU and of the Meadows School. A lifelong music lover, she gave several major gifts to establish endowment funds and initiatives for Meadows piano programs.

“Whether they know it or not, Jeanne Johnson’s legacy of philanthropy at the Meadows School has touched virtually every single music student for the last 20 years,” said Meadows Dean Samuel Holland. “The impact of her giving included a complete renovation of the music practice room complex, new and refurbished Steinway pianos, and scholarships for deserving students – not to mention a major gift to the National Center for Arts Research.

“Over many years, in part because of her love for the piano, Jeanne and our distinguished artist-in-residence, Joaquín Achúcarro, developed a warm and wonderful relationship. Jeanne was seen at virtually every piano event at the Meadows School and eagerly followed the careers of Joaquín’s students and alumni. I can’t imagine a more fitting tribute for this great lady than for Achúcarro to dedicate this recital – of repertoire Jeanne particularly loved – to her memory and her legacy.”

In October 2015, the French magazine Diapason selected Achúcarro’s BMG-RCA recording of Bernard Herrmann’s Concerto Macabre for Piano and Orchestra with London’s National Philharmonic Orchestra as one of “The Best 100 Piano Recordings of All Time,” along with such legends as Rachmaninoff, Horowitz and Rubinstein. He has even had a planet named after him: The International Astronomical Union christened the miniplanet 22191 “Achúcarro” in his honor.

Since winning the 1959 Liverpool International Competition, Achúcarro has toured 61 countries and played in venues such as Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, Berlin Philharmonie, Royal Albert Hall and Sydney Opera House. He has performed with more than 200 major orchestras, from the New York, Los Angeles and London Philharmonics to La Scala of Milan and the Tokyo Symphony. He has also played with more than 350 conductors, including Claudio Abbado, Zubin Mehta, Sir Yehudi Menuhin, Seiji Ozawa and Sir Simon Rattle.

He has also received the highest honors in the arts bestowed in his native Spain: the Gold Medal of Fine Arts, The National Award for Music and the Great Cross of Civil Merit.

> Read the full story at the SMU Meadows homepage

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