SMU panel to explore the history (and future) of privacy Oct. 31, 2012

Mary Spector

SMU panel to explore the history (and future) of privacy Oct. 31, 2012

A panel of SMU faculty members from a wide range of disciplines will examine the history of and emerging ramifications for the concept of privacy in the 21st century at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center West Ballroom.

The program launches the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute’s IMPACT (Interdisciplinary Meetings to Address Pressing Current Themes) series of symposia. Sponsored by the Embrey Family Foundation, the symposium is free and open to the public and includes a 3 p.m. reception.

Lee Cullum, journalist and fellow in SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies, will moderate the discussion. Panelists include SMU professors whose studies touch on some aspect of privacy:

  • George Holden is professor of psychology in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Holden specializes in developmental psychology with a focus on family violence and parent-child interactions. His current research involves analyzing home audio recordings of mothers and their preschoolers. “Psychologists are in the business of exploring people’s private lives — such as their secret thoughts and behavior behind closed doors,” Holden says. “Consequently, we are confronted with various thorny issues.”
  • Alexis McCrossen is associate professor of history in Dedman College whose specialty is U.S. social and cultural history. “Privacy is an institution that came of age in early modern Europe,” she says.
  • Beth Newman is associate professor of English and director of the Women and Gender Studies Program in Dedman College. Newman, whose specialty is 19th-century British literature, says “The concept of privacy developed alongside the rise of the novel, which reinforced its importance — especially for the middle class.”
  • Santanu Roy is professor of economics in Dedman College. Roy’s research interests are in industrial organization, natural resources and environment, international and economic growth.
  • Mary Spector is associate professor of law and director of the Consumer Law Project – both in Dedman School of Law. Spector’s research interests are in the areas of consumer credit, landlord-tenant law and clinical legal education.
  • Suku Nair is chair and professor of computer science and engineering in the Lyle School of Engineering. Nair’s research interests are in network and systems security and reliability.

The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute was made possible by a $5 million gift from the Dedman Family and the Dedman Foundation. The Institute was created to bring together faculty and students from the humanities, sciences and social sciences for collaborative research and other programs. The Institute will host annual seminars bringing together faculty, graduate and undergraduate students and members of the community to discuss global issues.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story at SMU News

October 30, 2012|Calendar Highlights, News|

Faculty in the News: May 25, 2010

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about strides being made by the Tea Party and its potential impact on the Republican Party with The Toronto Star May 19, 2010. He also discussed Texans with clout in Washington, D.C., with The San Antonio Express-News May 18, 2010.

Jean Kazez, Philosophy, Dedman College, discussed her new book, Animalkind: What We Owe to Animals, with host Krys Boyd on the KERA 90.1 FM program “Think” May 19, 2010. Listen to or download the program. audio

Dwight Lee, O’Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom, Cox School of Business, wrote an essay on why businessmen may be more honest than preachers, politicians and professors that appeared in the Winter 2010 edition of The Independent Review.

Mel Fugate, Management and Organizations, Cox School of Business, discussed the lack of progress in efforts to control executive pay in companies blamed for helping create the recent economic crisis for an article that appeared in The Pittsburgh Post May 16, 2010.

Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, Dedman College, talked about the social, political and economic impact of Dallas-Fort Worth-area immigrants with host Krys Boyd on the KERA 90.1 FM program “Think” May 18, 2010. Listen to or download the program. audio

Mary Spector, Civil Clinic, Dedman School of Law, talked about how the accomplishments of her mother, retired Texas Supreme Court Justice Rose Spector, influenced her own law career for an article that appeared in The Texas Lawyer May 3, 2010.

May 25, 2010|Faculty in the News|

Faculty in the News: April 27, 2010

Jasper Smits, Psychology, Dedman College, discussed his research on how exercise can help get rid of anxiety with USA Today April 26, 2010.

Peter Weyand, Applied Physiology and Wellness, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, discussed the recent selection of single-amputee distance runner Amy Palmiero-Winters to the U.S. track team for an article that appeared in USA Today April 26, 2010.

Mary Spector, Dedman School of Law, talked about issues that arise when debt-collection companies use litigation to collect past-due bills for an article that appeared in The New York Times April 22, 2010.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about civil-rights ramifications in the case of a gay couple seeking a divorce in Texas with The Fort Worth Star-Telegram April 20, 2010. He also discussed the popularity – and speaking fees – of Sarah Palin with the Star-Telegram April 19, 2010.

Alan Bromberg, Dedman School of Law, talked about the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s fraud suit against Goldman Sachs with CNN Money April 19, 2010.

Bernard Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, wrote about creating a nuclear renaissance by reprocessing nuclear fuel in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram April 17, 2010.

Brian Bruce, EnCap Investments & LCM Group Alternative Asset Management Center, Cox School of Business, discussed how volatile markets have pushed some to invest in gold and jewels for an article published in The Chicago Tribune April 14, 2010.

David Meltzer, Anthropology, Dedman College, and Vance Holliday of the University of Arizona discussed how Paleoindians coped with climate change 11,000 years ago with Science News April 12, 2010.

Stan Wojewodski, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, discussed his career and his work with Dallas’ Undermain Theatre as part of a profile that appeared in The Dallas Morning News April 10, 2010. He becomes chair of the Meadows Division of Theatre in Fall 2010.

Carolyn Macartney, Cinema-TV, Meadows School of the Arts, discussed her upcoming film about the life of her grandmother – a former Wild West sharpshooter who was billed as Wanda Savage – with The Dallas Morning News April 9, 2010.

April 27, 2010|Faculty in the News|

For the Record: Feb. 27, 2009

Linda Eads, Dedman School of Law, has received the 2009 Lola Wright Foundation Award from the Texas Bar Foundation. The honor recognizes “outstanding public service in advancing and enhancing legal ethics in Texas,” and recipients are attorneys “to whom professional ethics are paramount.” Past recipients include Berry Crowley, James Holmes III, Lloyd P. Lochridge, Jim Sales, Louise Raggio, Guy Harrison, Richard C. Hile, Justice Douglas S. Lan, and Scott J. Atlas. Eads will receive $5,000 to donate to the charity of her choice.

Mary Spector, Dedman School of Law, has been named a 2009 Bellow Scholar by a committee of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Section on Clinical Education, recognizing her project on the impact of debt collection litigation on consumers and the courts. Bellow Scholar awards are made every two years on the basis of “innovative proposals designed to improve the quality of justice in communities, to enhance the delivery of legal services, and to promote economic and social justice.” Other 2009 Bellow Scholars are from Harvard, Catholic University and the University of Michigan.

Ben Johnson, History, Dedman College, has received the 2008 Ray and Pat Browne Award for the Best Reference/Primary Source Work in Popular and American Culture from the Popular Culture and American Culture Association (PCA/ACA) for his book Bordertown: The Odyssey of an American Place (Yale University Press). He will accept the award at the PCA/ACA Conference in New Orleans April 10, 2009.

February 27, 2009|For the Record|
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