Mark Chancey

23 outstanding SMU professors honored at 2017 HOPE Awards banquet

 

SMU’s Department of Residence Life and Student Housing honored 23 outstanding professors at the 2017 HOPE Awards Banquet Tuesday, Feb. 7.

Mark Chancey, professor of religious studies Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, was honored as 2017 Professor of the Year.

HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Award recipients are named through student staff member nominations as professors who “have made a significant impact to our academic education both inside and outside of the classroom.”

The complete list of 2017 HOPE Award honorees:

Cox School of Business

  • Jay Carson, Management and Organizations
  • Liliana Hickman-Riggs, Accounting
  • Sal Mistry, Management and Organizations
  • Mukunthan Santhanakrishnan, Finance
  • Greg Sommers, Accounting
  • Tilan Tang, Finance

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

  • Stephanie Amsel, English
  • Mark Chancey, Religious Studies (HOPE Professor of the Year)
  • Rita Economos, Earth Sciences
  • Liljana Elverskog, World Languages and Literatures (Arabic)
  • Serge Frolov, Religious Studies
  • Luigi Manzetti, Political Science
  • Alberto Pastor, World Languages and Literatures (Spanish)
  • Elizabeth Wheaton, Economics
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Lyle School of Engineering

  • Elena Borzova, Mechanical Engineering,
  • Joseph Camp, Electrical Engineering
  • Rachel Goodman, Engineering Management, Information and Systems

Meadows School of the Arts

  • Brandi Coleman, Dance
  • Lee Gleiser, Meadows Marketing and Communications
  • Will Power, Theatre
  • Jared Schroeder, Journalism

Dedman School of Law

  • Martin Camp, Graduate and International Programs

> Read more from The Daily Campus

SMU announces five 2016 Ford Research Fellows

SMU Ford Research Fellows, 2016

Meghan Ryan, Ali Beskok, Frederick Chang, Jodi Cooley-Sekula and Mark Chancey (with SMU Provost Steven Currall) were honored as SMU’s 2016 Ford Research Fellows during the Board of Trustees meeting in May. Photo: SMU/Hillsman S. Jackson

Five distinguished SMU professors received awards for their scholarship and support for their research when there were named 2016 Ford Research Fellows during the Board of Trustees meeting Thursday, May 5.

This year’s recipients are Ali Beskok, Mechanical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; Mark Chancey, Religious Studies, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences; Frederick Chang, Computer Science and Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering; Jodi Cooley-Sekula, Physics, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences; and Meghan Ryan, Dedman School of Law.

Established in 2002 through a $1 million pledge from trustee Gerald J. Ford, the fellowships help SMU retain and reward outstanding scholars. Each recipient receives a cash prize for research support during the year.

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Research: Texas public-school Bible courses skirt state law

Stock photo of open BibleMost of the 60 public school districts in Texas that offer courses on the Bible aren’t meeting a 2007 state law mandating that those courses be fair as well as academically and legally sound, according to a new study by SMU religious studies expert Mark Chancey.

The study uncovered bias, factual errors and insufficient curriculum standards in Texas public school Bible courses. The report “Reading, Writing & Religion II” was carried out for the Austin-based education watchdog group Texas Freedom Network (TFN).

Chancey, a religious studies professor in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, recommends the Texas State Board of Education develop Bible course curriculum standards and the Texas Education Agency be allowed funds for a teacher training program. Chancey has devoted considerable attention to the constitutional, political and academic issues raised by religion courses in public schools.

“If public schools are going to have courses on the Bible, those courses need to be just as academically rigorous as courses in history, English, and math, not less rigorous. Some schools’ courses seemed more intent on promoting religious belief than religious literacy,” said Chancey, who reviewed tens of thousands of pages of material from Texas school districts.

“When public schools teach about religion, it’s essential that they do so in a way that does not promote some people’s religious beliefs over others,” he said. “Students and the Bible deserve our very best efforts, and at this point, as a state we’re not giving them that.”

Unable to lawfully insert creation science into science classes, some schools inserted it into Bible classes, Chancey said.

His research found, for example, that courses in several districts included efforts to reconcile a literalistic reading of the Genesis creation story with modern science. Some suggested that assuming lengthy gaps of time between each of the six days of creation explained why scientists believed the earth is so old. Several courses implied that belief in evolution was incompatible with being religious.

“One course’s materials even included a religious tract claiming that NASA had discovered a missing day in time that corresponded to the story of the sun standing still in the biblical book of Joshua,” Chancey said. “The first time I heard this claim, I did what any reasonable person would do: I called NASA. I knew that this story was an urban legend, of course, and NASA was able to direct me to a web page discrediting it.”

Written by Denise Gee

> Read the full story from the SMU Research blog

 

Good reading, good giving: SMU books for 2012

From art, history and religion to sweet Texas cuisine and fiction, SMU’s 2012 book roundup offers a wide selection to satisfy the readers in your life. Treat yourself or those on your gift list to one of the current titles listed below the link.

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Faculty in the News: Nov. 16, 2010

Henry Arthur McArdle, 'The Battle of San JacintoEric White, curator at SMU’s Bridwell Library, discussed James G. Pepper’s work creating a hand-lettered, hand-illustrated Bible with The United Methodist Church’s Interpreter Magazine. The article appeared in the November-December 2010 edition.

Sam Ratcliffe, head of special collections in SMU’s Hamon Arts Library, talked with The Houston Chronicle about the recent discovery of a smaller version of Texas artist Henry Arthur McArdle’s famed painting The Battle of San Jacinto (right) – a canvas previously thought to have been destroyed in a 1918 house fire. The article appeared in the paper’s Nov. 8, 2010 edition.

Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about Sarah Palin’s visit to Dallas and its potential impact on other politicians’ aspirations with The Dallas Morning News Nov. 10, 2010.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about how – and whether – President Obama can adapt to the new political realities of Washington with The Christian Science Monitor Nov. 6, 2010. In addition, he discussed the 2010 midterm elections with The Houston Chronicle and USA Today in articles that appeared Nov. 3, 2010.

Peter Raad on 'Ideas in Action with Jim Glassman'Peter Raad (right), Executive Director, The Guildhall at SMU, discussed the future landscape of video games on the nationally syndicated PBS series “Ideas in Action with Jim Glassman.” The show aired Nov. 4, 2010. Watch it online. video

Dennis Simon, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about Democratic successes in Dallas County elections despite Republican dominance of national races with The Dallas Morning News Nov. 3, 2010.

Anastasia Suen, Creative Writing, Continuing and Professional Studies, was featured in an article on the “Frisco Reads” program that appeared in The South Lake Times Oct. 27, 2010.

Bruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, talked with The Wall Street Journal about how cement used in oil drilling is prone to failure. The article appeared in the Oct. 30, 2010 edition.

Dan Howard, Marketing, Cox School of Business, discussed Halloween sales of candy, costumes and decorations as a barometer for general economic recovery with The Dallas Business Journal Oct. 29, 2010.

Mark Chancey, Religious Studies, Dedman College, talked about a Bible-based history curriculum being sought by a member of Louisiana’s Caddo Parish School Board with The Shreveport Times Nov. 2, 2010.

Faculty in the News: Oct. 12, 2010

Bernard Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, wrote about reasons for delaying the Environmental Protection Agency’s greenhouse gas rules in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram Oct. 6, 2010.

Linda Eads, Dedman School of Law, discussed the State Bar of Texas’ proposed “sex with clients” rule for an article published in The Dallas Morning News Oct. 4, 2010.

Rick Halperin, Embrey Human Rights Program, Dedman College, wrote a column in opposition to the death penalty that was published in The Dallas Morning News Oct. 6, 2010.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the race for Texas governor and the controversy over the distribution of money from the Texas Emerging Technology Fund with The Houston Chronicle Oct. 4, 2010.

Metin Eren, a graduate student in archaeology in Dedman College, was featured in a story on how scientists are rethinking theories on the intelligence of Neanderthals that appeared in The Washington Post Oct. 5, 2010.

Mark Chancey on MSNBCMark Chancey (right), Religious Studies, Dedman College, and the Rev. Robert Jeffress of the First Baptist Church of Dallas talked about the debate over how Islam is characterized in Texas textbooks with MSNBC News Sept. 24, 2010. video

David Chard, Dean, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, talked about education schools and the role they play in producing strong teachers with The Dallas Morning News Oct. 3, 2010.

Jeff Bellin, Dedman School of Law, talked with Reuters about a court hearing into the 2004 Texas execution of Cameron Todd Willingham for the arson murders of his three young daughters. The article was released Oct. 2, 2010, and appeared in numerous publications, including The Chicago Tribune.

Faculty in the News: Sept. 21, 2010

'Symmetry' magazine banana-peel physics photoSteve Sekula, Physics, Dedman College, wrote a brief article on “back-of-the-banana” calculations made by SMU graduate students Tingting Cao and Rozmin Daya and postdoctoral researcher Aidan Randle-Conde that appeared in the August 2010 edition of Symmetry magazine. The story was based on a post Sekula wrote for the University’s SMU @ CERN blog.

Bernard Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, talked about the slowdown of the Texas economy with The Dallas Morning News Sept. 18, 2010.

Mark Chancey, Religious Studies, Dedman College, wrote an op-ed about a resolution on Islam that the Texas State Board of Education is considering for textbook entries on the world’s major religions. The article appeared in The Dallas Morning News Sept. 17, 2010.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, has provided expertise concerning the potential impact on voters of having no 2010 Texas gubernational debate to media outlets including The Houston Chronicle on Sept. 14, 2010, and KERA Public Radio on Sept. 14, 2010. audio

Derek Kompare, Cinema-Television, Meadows School of the Arts, discussed the changing economics of TV reruns with National Public Radio Sept. 16, 2010.

Calendar Highlights: Jan. 26, 2010

Simon Conway MorrisDarwin Year continues: Fellow of the Royal Society Simon Conway Morris (right), professor of evolutionary paleobiology at the University of Cambridge, will present “Darwin’s Compass: Why the Evolution of Humans is Inevitable” at 3 p.m. Jan. 29 in McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall. The lecture is part of SMU’s Darwin’s Evolving Legacy series and is sponsored by the University’s Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series; Morris appears at the co-invitation of SMU’s Departments of Mathematics and Biological Sciences. For more information, visit the Darwin’s Evolving Legacy homepage.

Student symphony stars: SMU’s Meadows Symphony Orchestra presents a concert led by students in the Meadows School of the Arts‘ master’s degree program in orchestral conducting, and featuring winners of the Meadows Concerto Competition. The show begins at 8 p.m. Jan. 29 and 3 p.m. Jan. 31 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For tickets and information, contact the Meadows Box Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Ministers Week 2010: The annual gathering at SMU’s Perkins School of Theology complements the University’s 200th-anniversary celebration of Charles Darwin’s birth with “The Pew and the Petri Dish: Contemporary Issues in Religion and Science” Feb. 1-3 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center. Featured speakers include John Haught, senior fellow in science and religion at Georgetown University, author of God and the New Atheism, and winner of the 2002 Owen Garrigan Award in Science and Religion and the 2004 Sophia Award for Theological Excellence. Other lecturers include Gregory Cuellar, three-time fellow of the Hispanic Theological Initiative and adjunct professor of bible at Richland College, as well as SMU faculty members John Holbert, Rebekah Miles and William Abraham of the Perkins School and Mark Chancey of Dedman College. SMU community members can attend several Ministers Week events at discounted rates by visiting the Faculty/Staff/Student Registration page of the Ministers Week website.

Eugene Andolsek, 'Untitled 311C'Drawing inspiration: Artist and lifelong Rock Island Railroad employee Eugene Andolsek (1921-2008) produced thousands of drawings on graph paper over a period of 50 years, working alone at his kitchen table to ease the anxieties that plagued him his entire life. His work, exploring an array of colors and geometrical combinations, came to the attention of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, and Andolsek was one of five artists included in the 2006 Obsessive Drawing exhibition at the American Folk Art Museum in Manhattan. Now, selected works have been collected in a new exhibition at SMU – Kaleidoscope: Eugene Andolsek’s Geometric Ink Drawings runs Feb. 1-Mar. 20 in the Pollock Gallery, Hughes-Trigg Student Center. (Right, an untitled work featured in a 2008 Andolsek exhibition at the American Primitive Gallery in New York City.)

Beauty marked: SMU hosts a panel discussion examining the emphasis women place on striving for beauty and the damage they do to themselves in the process. “The Power and Burden of Beauty” features international artist Rachel Hovnanian, former national Fox News anchor Laurie Dhue; Bonnie Wheeler, director of medieval studies in SMU’s Dedman College; Carolyn Hodges, senior sales director with Mary Kay Cosmetics; and Rachel Dodds, UT student and sorority member. The discussion takes place 5-6:30 p.m. Feb. 2 in Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. For more information, call Lisa Bytner at 917-951-8940.

Faculty Club Distinguished Luncheon Series: The SMU Faculty Club presents Jim Hollifield, professor of international political economy and director of SMU’s Tower Center for Political Studies, in the first of two lectures on “Immigration and Migration” at noon Feb. 3 in the Faculty Club. Cost is $12 for members, $15 for non-members. RSVP by Jan. 29 to Dee Powell, 214-768-3012.

Students choose top professors in 2009 HOPE Awards

Wayne Shaw, 2009 HOPE Professor of the YearStudent staff members in SMU’s Department of Residence Life and Student Housing honored 55 University educators at the 2009 HOPE Awards Banquet in November. HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Award recipients are named through student staff member nominations as professors who “have made a significant impact to our academic education both inside and outside of the classroom.”

Wayne Shaw, Helmut Sohmen Distinguished Professor of Corporate Governance in the Cox School of Business, was honored as 2009 Professor of the Year. Three Dedman College professors – Mark Chancey, Religious Studies; Michael Lusztig, Political Science; and Tom Stone, English – were honored as Distinguished Professors, denoting that they have been recognized as HOPE Professors during at least 5 of the 12 years in which the honor has existed.

Read the complete list of honorees under the link below. Above, Professor of the Year Wayne Shaw (right in photo) with HOPE Committee member Ty Krueger, Fine Arts Community hall director.

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SMU community meets 2009 honorary degree recipients May 15

In keeping with University tradition, SMU will welcome its 2009 class of honorary degree recipients with a series of symposia in their honor. The symposia are scheduled for May 15, and all are free and open to the entire campus community.

“The honorary degree symposia are an opportunity for the campus and Dallas communities to see why these folks are being honored with an SMU degree,” says Fred Moss, associate professor in Dedman School of Law and symposium moderator. “Otherwise, they might simply be a name and a list of impressive credentials. They can be more fully appreciated as being outstanding in their fields though such events.”

The events and participants are as follows:

Harold W. Attridge• Panelists Mark Chancey of Dedman College‘s Religious Studies Department and Jaime Clark-Soles, Roy Heller and Susanne Scholz of Perkins School of Theology discuss “The Bible in American Public Life” in a symposium honoring Doctor of Divinity recipient honoris causa Harold W. Attridge, dean of Yale Divinity School. The symposium takes place 10 a.m.-noon in Perkins Chapel, preceded by a 9:15 a.m. reception in Bridwell Library.

Arthur Mitchell• Co-founder and artistic director of the Dance Theatre of Harlem and honorary Doctor of Arts recipient Arthur Mitchell will discuss his life and work with Meadows School of the Arts professors Shelley Berg, Dance, and Maria Dixon, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs, in “A Conversation with Arthur Mitchell,” followed by a Q & A with the audience. The event begins at 1 p.m. in O’Donnell Hall, 2130 Owen Arts Center.

Alexander McCall Smith• SMU faculty, staff and students are invited to meet acclaimed author and honorary Doctor of Humane Letters recipient Alexander McCall Smith and to take part in “A Conversation with Alexander McCall Smith,” moderated by Dedman School of Law Professor Fred Moss, from 2:30-4 p.m. in the Umphrey Lee Ballroom. The SMU Bookstore will sell McCall Smith’s books on site, and the author will autograph them after the program.

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