Maria Richards

SMU geothermal scientist Maria Richards becomes first woman president of the Geothermal Resources Council

Maria Richards, SMU Geothermal Laboratory

Maria Richards, coordinator of the SMU Geothermal Laboratory in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, has become the 26th president of the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC), as announced by the GRC on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017. She is the first woman president in the history of the global energy organization.

The GRC is an international geothermal body that focuses on continuing professional development for its members through its outreach, information transfer and education services.

Richards has been at the forefront of SMU’s geothermal energy research for more than a decade, and the University’s mapping of North American geothermal resources is considered the baseline for U.S. geothermal energy exploration. SMU’s Conference on Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas Fields, which she directs, is pioneering the transition of oil and gas fields to electricity-producing systems by harnessing waste heat and fluids.

Her projects range from computer-generated temperature-depth maps for Google.org to on-site geothermal exploration of the volcanic islands in the Northern Mariana Islands. Along with Cathy Chickering Pace, she also coordinates the SMU Node of the National Geothermal Data System funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Recently, Richards and her colleagues completed a high-resolution shallow Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) potential analysis for the Cascades region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Her other projects include the Eastern Texas Geothermal Assessment, the Dixie Valley Synthesis, and the resource assessment for the influential MIT report The Future of Geothermal Energy.

She previously served on the GRC Board of Directors and was chair of the Outreach Committee in 2011-12. She was also a Named Director of the 2015 Board for the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TREIA).

Richards holds an M.S. degree in physical geography from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and a B.S. in environmental geography from Michigan State University.

SMU to host geothermal energy conference May 18-20, 2015

Power Plays 2015 geothermal conference logo

The SMU Geothermal Laboratory will host its seventh international energy conference and workshop on the main campus May 19-20, 2015. The conference is designed to promote transition of oil and gas fields to electricity-producing geothermal systems by harnessing waste heat and fluids from both active and abandoned fields.

More than 200 professionals – ranging from members of the oil and gas service industry, to reservoir engineers, to geothermal energy entrepreneurs, to lawyers – are expected to attend “Power Plays: Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas Fields.

Topics of discussion will include:

  • Power generation from flare gas
  • Power generation from waste-heat and geothermal fluids
  • Research updates on induced seismicity, as well as onshore and offshore thermal maturation
  • Play Fairway Analysis – a subsurface mapping technique used to identify prospective geothermal resources
  • Technology updates

SMU Geothermal Lab logoResearchers from the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences will present results from their Fall 2014 Eastern North American Margin Community Seismic Experiment (ENAM CSE) research. In addition, equipment such as one-well systems, desalination and other new technologies will be explored.

SMU has been at the forefront of geothermal energy research for more than 45 years, and the Geothermal Laboratory’s mapping of North American geothermal resources is considered the baseline for U.S. geothermal energy exploration. Geothermal Laboratory Coordinator Maria Richards and Emeritus Professor David Blackwell have seen interest in geothermal energy wax and wane with the price of oil and natural gas.

But Richards believes current low oil prices will drive more interest in geothermal development, encouraging oil and gas producers to use geothermal production from existing oil and gas fields as they try to keep them cost-effective for petroleum production at 2015 prices.

The technology that will be examined at the conference is relatively straightforward: Sedimentary basins drilled for oil and gas production leave behind reservoir pathways that can later be used for heat extraction. Fluids moving through those hot reservoir pathways capture heat, which at the surface can be turned into electricity, or used downhole to replace pumping needs. In addition, the existing surface equipment used in active oil and gas fields generates heat, which also can be tapped to produce electricity and mitigate the cost of production.

“Oil and gas drilling rig counts are down,” Richards said. “The industry has tightened its work force and honed its expertise. The opportunity to produce a new revenue stream during an economically challenging period, through the addition of relatively simple technology at the wellhead, may be the best chance we’ve had in years to gain operators’ attention.”

Featured speakers include Jim Wicklund, managing director for equity research at Credit Suisse, who will speak on “Volatile Economics in the Oil Field,” and Holly Thomas and Tim Reinhardt from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office.

STW Water Process & Technology, a water reclamation and oilfield services company, will have desalination equipment on-site for attendees to understand size and scaling capacity of water purification for oil field operators.

Registration is still open; walk-ups will be accepted. For more information, visit smu.edu/geothermal.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

SMU geothermal scientist Maria Richards named 2016 president-elect of the Geothermal Resources Council

Maria Richards, SMU Geothermal LaboratoryMaria Richards, coordinator of the SMU Geothermal Laboratory in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, has been named president-elect of the Geothermal Resources Council. She will become the 26th president of the global energy organization beginning in 2017, and the first woman president in its history.

Richards has been at the forefront of SMU’s geothermal energy research for more than a decade, and the University’s mapping of North American geothermal resources is considered the baseline for U.S. geothermal energy exploration. SMU’s Conference on Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas fields, which Richards directs, is pioneering the transition of oil and gas fields to electricity-producing systems by harnessing waste heat and fluids.

“The Geothermal Resources Council is a tremendous forum for expanding ideas about geothermal exploration and technology related to this commonly overlooked source of energy provided by the Earth,” Richards said. “It’s a great opportunity for educating people about an energy source that covers the whole gamut – from producing electricity for industries, to reducing our electricity consumption with direct-use applications, to even cooling our homes.”

“This also is a unique occasion for me to encourage and mentor young women to participate in the sciences throughout their careers and get involved in leadership roles,” she added.

SMU’s seventh international geothermal energy conference and workshop is scheduled for May 18-20, 2015, on the Dallas campus. Designed to reach a broad audience, from the service industry to reservoir engineers, “Power Plays: Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas Fields,” is an opportunity for oil and gas industry professionals to connect with the geothermal and waste-heat industries to build momentum. The conference is a platform for networking with attendees from all aspects of project development. Presentations will highlight reservoir topics from flare gas usage to induced seismicity and will address new exploration opportunities, including offshore sites in the eastern United States.

Find information and registration for SMU’s 2015 Geothermal Energy Conference: smu.edu/geothermal

Richards’ projects at SMU’s Geothermal Laboratory vary from computer-generated temperature-depth maps for Google.org to on-site geothermal exploration of the volcanic islands in the Northern Mariana Islands. Along with Cathy Chickering Pace, Richards coordinates the SMU Node of the National Geothermal Data System funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Richards has previously served on the Geothermal Resources Council Board of Directors and was chair of the Outreach Committee in 2011-12. She is also a Named Director of the 2015 Board for the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TREIA).

Richards holds an M.S. degree in physical geography from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and a B.S. in environmental geography from Michigan State University.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read the full story from the SMU Research blog

Research Spotlight: Mapping confirms vast geothermal resources

Coast-to-coast U.S. geothermal map from the SMU Geothermal LaboratoryNew research from the SMU Geothermal Laboratory, funded by a grant from Google.org, documents significant geothermal resources across the United States capable of producing more than three million megawatts of green power – 10 times the installed capacity of coal power plants today.

Sophisticated mapping produced from the research, viewable via Google Earth, demonstrates that vast reserves of this source of power are realistically accessible using current technology.

The results of the new research, from SMU Hamilton Professor of Geophysics David Blackwell and Geothermal Lab Coordinator Maria Richards, confirm and refine locations for resources capable of supporting large-scale commercial geothermal energy production under a wide range of geologic conditions, including significant areas in the eastern two-thirds of the United States.

The estimated amounts and locations of heat stored in the Earth’s crust included in this study are based on nearly 35,000 data sites – approximately twice the number used for Blackwell and Richards’ 2004 Geothermal Map of North America, leading to improved detail and contouring at a regional level.

Based on the additional data, primarily drawn from oil and gas drilling, larger local variations can be seen in temperatures at depth, highlighting more detail for potential power sites than was previously evident in the eastern portion of the U.S. For example, eastern West Virginia has been identified as part of a larger Appalachian trend of higher heat flow and temperature.

Conventional U.S. geothermal production has been restricted largely to the western third of the country in geographically unique and tectonically active locations.

However, newer technologies and drilling methods can now be used to develop resources in a wider range of geologic conditions, allowing reliable production of clean energy at temperatures as low as 100˚C (212˚F) – and in regions not previously considered suitable for geothermal energy production. Preliminary data released from the SMU study in October 2010 revealed the existence of a geothermal resource under the state of West Virginia equivalent to the state’s existing (primarily coal-based) power supply.

“Once again, SMU continues its pioneering work in demonstrating the tremendous potential of geothermal resources,” said Karl Gawell, executive director of the Geothermal Energy Association. “Both Google and the SMU researchers are fundamentally changing the way we look at how we can use the heat of the Earth to meet our energy needs, and by doing so are making significant contributions to enhancing our national security and environmental quality.”

“This assessment of geothermal potential will only improve with time,” said Blackwell. “Our study assumes that we tap only a small fraction of the available stored heat in the Earth’s crust, and our capabilities to capture that heat are expected to grow substantially as we improve upon the energy conversion and exploitation factors through technological advances and improved techniques.”

Blackwell is scheduled to release a paper with details of the results of the research to the Geothermal Resources Council in October 2011.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Get the full story from the SMU Research blog
> Watch a Google.org video on Enhanced Geothermal Systems video

For the Record: May 19, 2011

Ron WetheringtonRon Wetherington (top right), Anthropology, Dedman College, has been appointed to the State Textbook Review Panel for Supplemental Science. Wetherington, who also serves as director of the University’s Center for Teaching Excellence, will serve on the review panel for Supplemental Science Biology, which will meet in Austin during the week of June 13-17, 2011.

The review panel will help determine instructional materials to be used by school districts and open-enrollment charter schools for the next several years. Panel members’ responsibilities include reviewing and evaluating instructional materials submitted for the adoption by the State Board of Education; determining the extent to which instructional materials cover the required Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS); and identifying factual errors in the materials.

Anthony Cortese, Sociology, Dedman College, participated in the Pacific Sociological Association meetings in Seattle, Washington. He critiqued Behind the Backlash: Muslims After 9/11 by Lori Peek in an “Author Meets the Critics” session and organized and moderated two sessions on immigration: “Immigrants and Immigration Policy” and “Latino Immigrants: Human Rights and Economic Issues.” He also presented a paper, “The Blurring of Goffman’s Concepts of Private and Public Pictures on Social Networks,” at the Southern Sociological Society meetings in Jacksonville, Florida.

Jodi Cooley, Physics, Dedman College, has received a 2011 Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award, sponsored by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). The award provides $10,000 to support her research. Cooley is one of 30 awardees selected nationally this year.

Chef Elias Acosta, SMU Dining Services, by Michael Danser, The Daily CampusElias Acosta (middle right), SMU Dining Services, earned a Gold Medal in the Southwest Regional ARAMARK Culinary Excellence (ACE) Challenge 2011. He won the award for his menu of Pan-Seared Pistachio Crusted Sea Bass with glazed baby carrots and risotto, and a dessert of Handmade Crêpes with Grand Marnier Goat Cheese garnished with figs and fresh mandarin segments. Acosta will be one of three chefs to represent the Southwest Region in the ACE National Competition in July. (Photo by Michael Danser, The Daily Campus.)

Amy Buono, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, has received post-doctoral fellowships from both the Getty Research Institute and the American Association of University Women. She will be in residence during 2011-12 at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, completing work on her book manuscript Feather Techné: Tupinambá Interculture in Early Modern Brazil and Europe.

Buono also is completing work on an edited translation of the 1766 illustrated Jesuit medicinal Collecção de varias receitas de segredos particulares des principaes boticas da nossa companhia de Portugal, da India, de Macao e do Brasil, with E. J. Brill Publishers. In Summer 2010 Buono received a residential New World Comparative Studies Summer Fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University.

Emily George Grubbs, Central University Libraries, will present a gallery talk, “Adventures in the Archives: Discovering the Gigaku Masks,” at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) May 25, 2011. Grubbs, curatorial assistant for the Hamon Arts Library’s Bywaters Special Collections, will discuss her discovery of two rare Japanese masks dating from the 8th to 10th centuries among the artifacts in the Library’s McCord/Renshaw Collection. Her co-presenter is Anne Bromberg, the DMA’s Cecil and Ida Green Curator of Ancient and Asian Art.

Ramsey Kweik and Maria Richards, SMU Geothermal LaboratoryRoberto Tejada, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, will serve as a juror for the National Book Award in 2011-12.

Ramsey Kweik, a geological sciences major and 2011 graduating senior in Dedman College, was named SMU’s 2011 Student Employee of the Year in April. Kweik worked as an assistant in the SMU Geothermal Laboratory for nearly four years. His responsibilities include assisting with research projects from federal and state agencies and private companies, giving presentations as part of the geothermal outreach program, and assisting with coordination of the international Geothermal Energy Utilization Associated with Oil and Gas Development conference hosted by SMU.

In her nomination letter, Geothermal Laboratory Program Coordinator Maria Richards wrote, “I have seen Ramsey demonstrate reliability, quality of work, initiative, a positive attitude and professionalism in all that he contributes to the SMU Geothermal Laboratory. Although he is a student employee, he has become a friend and colleague over the past four years.” (Bottom right, Ramsey Kweik and Maria Richards.)

Research Spotlight: West Virginia a hotbed of geothermal energy

wv-image-03-press-release.jpgNew research produced by SMU’s Geothermal Laboratory, funded by a grant from Google.org, suggests that the temperature of the Earth beneath the state of West Virginia is significantly higher than previously estimated and capable of supporting commercial baseload geothermal energy production.

Geothermal energy is the use of the Earth’s heat to produce heat and electricity. “Geothermal is an extremely reliable form of energy, and it generates power 24/7, which makes it a baseload source like coal or nuclear,” said David Blackwell, Hamilton Professor of Geophysics in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences and Director of the SMU Geothermal Laboratory.

The SMU Geothermal Laboratory has increased its estimate of West Virginia’s geothermal generation potential to 18,890 megawatts, assuming a conservative 2 percent thermal recovery rate. The new estimate represents a 75 percent increase over estimates in MIT’s 2006 “The Future of Geothermal Energy” report and exceeds the state’s total current generating capacity, primarily coal based, of 16,350 megawatts.

The West Virginia discovery is the result of new detailed mapping and interpretation of temperature data derived from oil, gas, and thermal gradient wells – part of an ongoing project to update the Geothermal Map of North America that Blackwell produced with colleague Maria Richards in 2004. Temperatures below the earth almost always increase with depth, but the rate of increase (the thermal gradient) varies due to factors such as the thermal properties of the rock formations.

“By adding 1,455 new thermal data points from oil, gas, and water wells to our geologic model of West Virginia, we’ve discovered significantly more heat than previously thought,” Blackwell said. “The existing oil and gas fields in West Virginia provide a geological guide that could help reduce uncertainties associated with geothermal exploration and also present an opportunity for co-producing geothermal electricity from hot waste fluids generated by existing oil and gas wells.”

The team’s work may also shed light on other similar geothermal resources. “We now know that two zones of Appalachian age structures are hot – West Virginia and a large zone covering the intersection of Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana known as the Ouachita Mountain region,” said Blackwell. “Right now we don’t have the data to fill in the area in between,” Blackwell continued, “but it’s possible we could see similar results over an even larger area.”

Blackwell thinks the finding opens exciting possibilities for the region. “The proximity of West Virginia’s large geothermal resource to east coast population centers has the potential to enhance U.S. energy security, reduce CO2 emissions, and develop high paying clean energy jobs in West Virginia,” he said.

SMU’s Geothermal Laboratory conducted this research through funding provided by Google.org’s RE<C initiative, which is dedicated to using the power of information and innovation to advance breakthrough technologies in clean energy.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read more from the SMU Research blog

SMU researcher among experts at Geothermal Showcase in D.C.

Maria Richards and David BlackwellMaria Richards, coordinator of SMU’s Geothermal Lab, was among the industry leaders and experts presenting a Geothermal Showcase at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., on May 6.

Participants virtually visited some of the leading geothermal energy development projects in the United States and heard from companies at the forefront of geothermal power growth. A panel of leading geothermal scientists discussed how geothermal resources can contribute to the world’s energy needs.

When most people think of geothermal energy, they usually think of extremely high heat, such as geysers. But the Geothermal Map of North America produced by Richards and Professor David Blackwell for the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in 2004 revealed locations all over the United States where subsurface temperatures are high enough to drive small, binary power plants and generate electricity. Blackwell and Richards are members of the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in SMU’s Dedman College.

This kind of power plant is similar to an air conditioning unit run backwards, using heat to generate electricity. The hot water that runs through one chamber in the pump heats fluid with a lower boiling point in an adjacent chamber, which expands into high-pressure vapor and drives a turbine.

Deep drilling through hard rock is expensive, which is one reason traditional geothermal energy development has lagged behind green technologies like wind and solar power. But Blackwell’s mapping has proven that many existing oil and gas wells in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and some mid-continent states reach shallower depths where temperatures still range from 200-300 degrees Fahrenheit – hot enough for a binary power plant to do its job.

The Geothermal Showcase was sponsored by the Geothermal Energy Association along with Ormat, Enel North America, and Pratt and Whitney Power Systems.

(Above, Maria Richards and David Blackwell of SMU’s Huffington Department of Earth Sciences.)

Read more from SMU News

Google invests in SMU geothermal research

SMU's Geothermal Map of North AmericaSearch engine giant Google will help fund SMU’s geothermal resource mapping, underscoring the importance of the University’s research toward alternate energy technology.

Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Silicon Valley web company, will grant nearly $500,000 to the Geothermal Lab in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences to update mapping of geothermal resources. The Google grant will allow SMU to provide information on the potential for geothermal energy production in regions where geothermal data has previously been spotty or unavailable.

“Enhanced geothermal systems could be the ‘killer app’ of the energy world,” said Dan Reicher, director of climate and energy initiatives for Google.org. “It has the potential to deliver vast quantities of power 24/7 and be captured nearly anywhere on the planet. And it would be a perfect complement to intermittent sources like solar and wind.”

David Blackwell, Hamilton Professor of Geothermal Studies in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, and Maria Richards, Geothermal Lab coordinator, previously collaborated on the Geothermal Map of North America (right) for the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in 2004. The SMU map shows the potential for enhanced geothermal systems development nationwide.

Read more from SMU News.
See a Google.org video on how enhanced geothermal systems work.

By | 2008-09-05T13:50:04+00:00 September 5, 2008|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , |

Tune In: “Green Machine” draws power from heat

SMU Geothermal Lab Coordinator Maria RichardsThe SMU Physical Plant is testing the performance of the “Green Machine,” which can generate electricity from waste heat. Geothermal Lab Coordinator Maria Richards discusses the Machine’s usefulness as a teaching tool in this CW 33 video from July 25, 2008.

Engineering Dean Geoffrey Orsak is a new regular columnist for the engineering publication Design News. Read two of his recent essays at the SMU News website:

“Let’s Not Forget the Dollar Per Day Economy,” June 2008
“Our Big Asterisks*,” August 2008

By | 2008-08-29T10:47:27+00:00 August 29, 2008|Categories: Tune In|Tags: , , , |

Faculty in the News: Summer 2008

VOTE buttonsCal Jillson, Political Science, provided expertise for several Election 2008 stories during the summer, discussing:

  • the significance of Hillary Clinton’s prime-time speech placement at the Democratic National Convention in The Canadian Press Aug. 24, 2008
  • the drama viewers won’t see at the major parties’ political conventions in The Arizona Republic Aug. 18, 2008
  • the “mixed bag” for students and universities resulting from the new Higher Education Act in The Fort Worth Star-Telegram Aug. 10, 2008, as well as Texas’ fund-raising importance to both major political parties in the paper’s July 28, 2008 edition
  • the reasons why John Cornyn’s campaign press releases are aimed at his Republican colleagues in the U.S. Senate rather than at his Democratic opponent, Rick Noriega, in The Houston Chronicle Aug. 4, 2008
  • Texas Democrats’ hopes that Barack Obama’s candidacy can help the state party rebound in the Associated Press July 17, 2008, as well as the lack of a “quick fix” for the foreclosure crisis, now matter who is elected president, with the wire service for its July 5, 2008 edition
  • how the gay-marriage issue will play out in the presidential campaign in Reuters June 19, 2008
  • the differences in style and substance between Cindy McCain and Michelle Obama in Singapore’s The Electric New Paper June 15, 2008

Gas pumpBruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, spoke with several media outlets during Summer 2008 about soaring fuel prices and other energy issues, including:

Peter Weyand, Simmons School of Education and Human Development, discussed Usain Bolt’s Olympic sprinting performance, and the possibility of humans someday running as fast as the fastest four-legged animals, with The Times of India Aug. 20, 2008.

Suku Nair, Computer Science and Engineering, talked about growing concerns for the security of wireless technology with Fox 4 News Aug. 17, 2008.

SMU Olympic swimmerDave Wollman, Track and Field/Cross Country, shared tips on how to train like an Olympian with The Dallas Morning News Aug. 12, 2008.

Fred Moss, Law, discussed recent developments in the Dallas City Hall corruption case with CBS 11 News Aug. 13, 2008. He talked about the merits of hate-crime charges being filed against a man accused of committing random shootings in four Dallas suburbs with The Dallas Morning News July 9, 2008. In addition, he discussed the issues involved in using DNA testing to exonerate those who may have been wrongly convicted of crimes with Reuters July 2, 2008.

Van Kemper, Anthropology, spoke with The Dallas Morning News Aug. 12, 2008, about how the proposed renaming of historic Ross Avenue has put the Dallas City Council in a no-win situation.

Mike Davis, Finance, discussed why the Consumer Price Index may not match a family’s reality with The Dallas Morning News Aug. 4, 2008.

Linda Eads, Law, talked about the merits of searching a defense attorney’s office in a Frisco, Texas murder-for-hire case with The Dallas Morning News July 27, 2008.

Edward Fox, Marketing, discussed the implications of the Minyard supermarket chain’s sale of 37 Carnival stores, along with the Carnival brand itself, with The Dallas Morning News July 24, 2008. He also talked about Wal-Mart’s plans to dramatically scale down a proposed new store in Austin with The Austin American-Statesman June 24, 2008.

Planet EarthMaria Richards, Earth Sciences, discussed geothermal energy as the “lost” component of the alternative-energy push with U.S. News & World Report July 21, 2008.

Patricia Mathes, Institute for Reading Research, talked about North Texas students’ struggles with the written portion of the TAKS test with The Dallas Morning News July 20, 2008.

Mark Chancey, Religious Studies, discussed a decision by the State Board of Education to allow elective Bible courses in Texas high schools with The Dallas Morning News July 11, 2008.

Matt Wilson, Political Science, discussed whether Karl Rove’s criticism of Mitt Romney is aimed at helping Romney become John McCain’s running mate with Salt Lake City’s Deseret News July 16, 2008. He also talked about why both Barack Obama and John McCain need the abortion issue with Reuters May 28, 2008.

Al Armendariz, Environmental and Civil Engineering, discussed the shortcomings of the new North Texas clean-air plan with the Dallas Business Journal July 11, 2008.

Geoff Orsak, Engineering Dean, provided expertise for a Robert Miller column on how North Texas engineering schools are meeting the demand for engineers with state-of-the-art programs and facilities. The column appeared in The Dallas Morning News June 29, 2008.

Alan Brown, Psychology, discussed his research, which may reveal the secret to winning game shows, with Psychology Today for its July/August 2008 issue.

Dan Howard, Marketing, provided expertise for a story on how frugal spenders can buck an economic downturn that appeared in The Arizona Republic Aug. 8, 2008. He talked about how rising ticket prices will affect the future of the airline industry in The Dallas Morning News June 23, 2008. In addition, he discussed how General Motors’ possible discontinuation of the Hummer reflects the restructuring of the North American automotive industry with The Ottawa Citizen June 14, 2008.

Jessica Dixon, Law, discussed the “puzzling” actions of Texas Child Protective Services in the case of the FDLS polygamist cult with The Dallas Morning News June 18, 2008.

Oil derrickFrank Lloyd, Cox Executive Education, discussed the importance of capable leadership in the global petroleum industry with The Earth Times June 18, 2008.

Robin Lovin, Maguire University Professor of Ethics, discussed the changing relationship between religion and politics in an essay published in Religion and Ethics Newsweekly June 12, 2008.

Joseph Dancy, Law, discussed how landowners can test the mineral-rights market through an eBay auction with Platts June 3, 2008

Ron Moss, Admissions, discussed the effects of intense college admission competition among the 2008 high school graduating class with WFAA Channel 8 June 3, 2008.