SMU faculty to help lead immigration history conference at Dallas’ Old Red Museum Sept. 19, 2015

Margaret Spellings

SMU faculty to help lead immigration history conference at Dallas’ Old Red Museum Sept. 19, 2015

Immigrants going through San Angelo, Texas - early photograph, Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photography Collection

A photo by M.C. Ragsdale ca. 1885-90 of immigrants passing through San Angelo, Texas. From the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photography Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

The challenging task of teaching a controversial subject to middle- and high-school students will be the focus of an upcoming immigration conference featuring several University faculty members.

SMU and the Old Red Museum of Dallas County History & Culture are partnering with Humanities Texas and the Texas Historical Commission to present a conference on the history of U.S. immigration from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015 at the museum.

“Issues surrounding immigration are at the forefront of public discourse these days,” said Zac Harmon, executive director of the Old Red Museum. “Statistics and beliefs are strongly held but are often mistaken for facts. This conference will provide documented, factual information for teachers, politicians and other citizens who really want to understand the issue. We are grateful to the Philip R. Jonsson Foundation for sponsoring this first of what we hope will become an annual conference.”

Conference participants can choose to hear two of six speakers scheduled during the morning session. Lunch and a keynote address by Margaret Spellings, president of the George W. Bush Presidential Center and former secretary of education (2005-09), will follow.

Afternoon breakout sessions will provide teachers with lesson plans, materials and strategies to help them make history come alive for students of all grade levels. Teachers attending both sessions can earn six Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

Topics and speakers include:

  • “D/FW Becoming an Immigrant Gateway” – Caroline Brettell, University Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Ruth Collins Altshuler Director of SMU’s Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute
  • “Gone To Texas: Immigration to the Lone Star State in the 19th Century” – Gregg Cantrell, Emma and Ralph Lowe Chair of Texas History, TCU
  • “Immigration and the Changing Face of America” – Neil Foley, Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History, Dedman College
  • “Visualizing the Changing Landscape of U.S. Immigration” – Kyle Walker, assistant professor of population and urban geography, TCU
  • “Managing Migration in an Era of Globalization” – James F. Hollifield, Ora Nixon Arnold Professor of International Political Economy and director of SMU’s Tower Center for Political Studies
  • “Immigration and the Changing Demography of Liberal Democracies” – Gary Freeman, professor of government, University of Texas-Austin

Registration, which includes a continental breakfast, lunch, parking, materials and access to the exhibit area, is $25 and can be completed online at www.oldred.org. For information, contact Shannon Page at the Old Red Museum, 214-757-1927.

Written by Kenny Ryan

September 2, 2015|Calendar Highlights, For the Record, News|

Calendar Highlights: March 29, 2011

Margaret Spellings and Geoffrey CanadaTate Series focuses on the future of education: A discussion of the future viability of American education will be the focus of the next 2010-11 Tate Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday, March 29. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings and Harlem Children’s Zone founder and CEO Geoffrey Canada will discuss “How Will We Teach America’s Children?” at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. Moderator for the event will be Keven Ann Willey, vice president and editorial page editor of The Dallas Morning News. Spellings was the U.S. Secretary of Education from 2005-09 and led the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act. She is president and CEO of Margaret Spellings and Company and a leading national expert in public policy. In 2009, SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development recognized her contributions to education with the Simmons Luminary Award. The Harlem Children’s Zone was featured in the 2010 film “Waiting for ‘Superman’.” Through this program, Canada has dedicated the past 20 years to helping impoverished, at-risk youth to rise above their circumstances. The Zone Project today covers a 100-block area of Harlem and serves 10,000 children and their families through in-school and after-school programs, social services and community-building programs. The evening lecture is sold out, but the speakers will answer questions from the SMU community and local high school students during the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Tate Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Admission to the Student Forum is free. For more information, call Program Services at 214-768-8283 (214-SMU-TATE).

In addition, the Simmons School will present a free screening of “Waiting for ‘Superman'” at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 31, in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater. The screening will be followed by a Q&A session with panelists Charles Glover, executive director of Teach for America, Dallas; Israel Cordero, principal of the Dallas Independent School District’s W.W. Samuell High School; and Deborah Diffily, Simmons faculty member. The discussion will be moderated by Lee Alvoid, chair of Simmons’ Education Policy and Leadership Department. Refreshments will be provided. Cosponsored by the SMU Program Council, Sigma Lambda Beta International Fraternity Inc. and SMU Colony.

Main cast of 'Indigenes'French Film Festival continues: The 15th-anniversary celebration of SMU’s French Film Festival continues through April 9, 2011. Among the upcoming screenings is Daratt (2006) on Friday, April 1. Written and directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun and winner of a Grand Special Jury Prize (UNESCO Award) at the 2006 Venice Film Festival, the film deals with themes of family, vengeance and redemption in the aftermath of the devastating civil war in Chad. The festival continues Wednesday, April 6, with Indigènes (Days of Glory, 2006). César and Lumière award-winning cowriter and director Rachid Bouchareb tells the stories of four North African recruits who fight to liberate France during World War II, as well as for equal treatment in the French military and society. All screenings are at 7 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Theater, and all films will be shown in French with English subtitles. Admission is free and open to the public. These films are intended for an adult audience and may contain sexual content, nudity and violence. Sponsored by the SMU French Club, the SMU Students’ Association and the Tournées Festival. For more information and a complete schedule, visit the 2011 French Film Festival homepage.
(Right, Roschdy Zem, Samy Naceri, Jamel Debbouze and Sami Bouajila in Indigènes.)

March 29, 2011|Calendar Highlights|

Tate Distinguished Lecture Series announces 2010-11 season

Tate Distinguished Lecture Series logoSMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series announced its 2010-11 lineup during Diane Keaton‘s season-closing lecture May 4.

The speakers include Dallas pastor T.D. Jakes of The Potter’s House, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz and magazine editor Tina Brown – as well as former presidential cabinet members Robert Rubin (Secretary of the Treasury during the Clinton Administration) and Margaret Spellings (Secretary of Education under George W. Bush).

One fall 2010 speaker is yet to be announced. All lectures take place at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

> Watch the Tate Lecture Series homepage for updates

The schedule at a glance:

• Sept. 14, 2010: Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR); and Robert Rubin, CFR chairman and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1995-99 – moderated by David Gergen, CNN senior political analyst and former presidential adviser

• Oct. 5, 2010: Ray Kurzweil, developer of computer speech, optical character recognition and synthesized music technology, and inventor of the K-NFB Reader for the blind and learning-disabled

• Fall 2010: Speaker to be announced

• Nov. 30, 2010: Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University professor, Nobel laureate and author of Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy

• Jan. 25, 2011: T.D. Jakes, philanthropist, entrepreneur and chief pastor of The Potter’s House in Dallas

• Feb. 15, 2011: Joshua Cooper Ramo, award-winning journalist, expert on China and author of The Age of the Unthinkable

• March 29, 2011: Geoffrey Canada, president and CEO of The Harlem Children’s Zone; and Margaret Spellings, U.S. Secretary of Education, 2005-09

• May 3, 2011: Tina Brown, former editor of The New Yorker and Vanity Fair and founder/editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast

> Find season ticket information at the Tate Series website

May 5, 2010|News|

2009 Luminary Awards honor education leaders

SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development honored three outstanding education leaders with its first annual Simmons Luminary Awards – former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, longtime Texas State Board of Education member Geraldine “Tincy” Miller and St. Philip’s School headmaster Dr. Terry J. Flowers. All three received their awards at a reception and dinner on the SMU campus Nov. 19.

“The Simmons Luminary Awards honor women and men who are real education reformers – people willing to step outside the status quo and follow evidence, rather than tradition, to improve outcomes for our students,” said David Chard, Leon Simmons Dean of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School. “This year’s three recipients serve as beacons on the education landscape.”

“People are frequently satisfied with great ideas,” Chard said. “But ideas aren’t enough. What we don’t often have are people like Terry Flowers, with 25 years of proven results; Tincy Miller, who realized that her focus on her son’s dyslexia needed to be expanded to all dyslexic children; and Margaret Spellings, who had the opportunity and the courage to move an accountability system from concept to national priority.”

All three Luminary Award winners have demonstrated a willingness to make bold changes in policy and practice to improve students’ lives, Chard said.

Terry FlowersFlowers is headmaster and executive director of St. Philip’s School and Community Center in south Dallas. Under his leadership, St. Philip’s has developed a curriculum that emphasizes academic excellence and a positive self-image in a community that struggles with poverty and low graduation rates. St. Philip’s records a 97 percent high school graduation rate and an 88 percent college attendance rate for alumni of the school’s Pre-K through 6th grade program.

Tincy MillerMiller, who graduated from SMU in 1956, has served on the Texas State Board of Education since 1984. She has distinguished herself by promoting better curricula and programs for dyslexic children, helping to pass the Texas State Dyslexia Law for public schools, facilitating the creation of the Dyslexia Handbook: Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders and helping establish the first statewide dyslexia academies.

Margaret SpellingsSpellings is president and CEO of Margaret Spellings and Company, and a leading expert in national public policy. Spellings was U.S. Secretary of Education from 2005-09, the first mother of school-age children to serve in that position. She directed the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act, which commits U.S. schools to bringing all students up to grade level or better in reading and math.

Read more from SMU News
Hear Margaret Spellings’ interview on KERA’s “Think” with Krys Boyd audio

December 1, 2009|News|
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