Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility

Seven students named Maguire and Irby Family Public Service interns

Maguire Center graphicSeven SMU students have been named Maguire and Irby Family Public Service Interns, earning positions in a 14-year-old program that provides summer stipends for public service volunteer work and research.

The interns will work in a variety of programs as far away as Angola and Nicaragua, and as close as Austin and Dallas. The program, sponsored by SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and the Irby Family Foundation, has supported volunteers in 13 states, and 11 countries outside the USA and in more than 100 agencies in Texas.

“We approved grants for more international internships this year than last and continue to see more proposals from graduate students,” said Thomas Mayo, Maguire Center director. “The graduate students, in particular, clearly see these internships as an opportunity to use their advanced studies in a new, nonprofit context that benefits the communities where they will serve. All the students, though, will have potentially life-altering experiences, and the Maguire Center is pleased to help make that happen.”

The 2010 interns and their projects:

Shay Cannedy, an anthropology graduate student in Dedman College, will work with the Green Leaf Program at Refugee Services of Texas Inc. in Austin to develop marriage education classes and help develop a program evaluation system.

John Duvenci, a combined undergraduate/graduate student in the Lyle School of Engineering, will work with Living Water International in Luanda, Angola, to develop a water treatment system for an orphanage.

Kendra Eaton, a junior majoring in markets and culture in Dedman College, will work with Fundacion A. Jean Brugger in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua, tutoring students in English and teaching both art appreciation for children and workshops to help enhance local residents’ computer skills.

Lisa Haayen, a Ph.D. student in cultural anthropology in Dedman College, will compare student retention rates and outcomes at two Vickery Meadows Learning Center sites in West Dallas.

Anders Pedersen, a junior majoring in markets and culture in Dedman College, will go to northern Uganda to work with Elephant Sisters, a fair trade art cooperative, to help build low-cost homes, counsel former child soldiers and teach basic English language skills to children.

Sheba Rasson, a junior psychology and business major, will work in Dallas at Legal Hospice of Texas on client orientation materials and registrations, and will assist with research and preparation of legal documents.

Ablat Turson, a Ph.D. student in biology in Dedman College, will work at International Students Inc. to pair the needs of international students studying at Dallas universities with potential resource-delivery systems.

Applications for Public Service Internships are posted by the Maguire Center in late fall, and the submission deadline is usually early February.

> VIsit the Maguire Center website at smu.edu/ethicscenter

Watergate lawyer discusses ethics and conflict March 30

Egil 'Bud' KroghEgil “Bud” Krogh, a former Nixon Administration official who became famous for his role in the Watergate scandal, will speak on campus March 30. He will give a lecture entitled “In the Shadow of Watergate: Working as a Young Lawyer in the Nixon White House” at noon and 5 p.m. in 207 Florence Hall.

Krogh is the co-author of Integrity: Good People, Bad Choices, and Life Lessons From the White House. He will discuss his work as head of the White House Special Investigation Unit – more infamously known as “The Plumbers” – and the ethical dilemmas he faced as a young lawyer in the Nixon White House between 1968 and 1973.

Both talks are free and open to the public and are cosponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and the Association for Law & Politics in the University’s Dedman School of Law. For more information, contact Terri Gwinn, 214-768-2162.

For the Record: March 19, 2010

Peter Moore, ad interim dean of Dedman College and professor of mathematics, has been elected to membership in Phi Beta Kappa by the SMU (Gamma of Texas) chapter of the honor society, which recognizes and advocates excellence in the liberal arts and sciences. Moore is the first administrator to be so honored in SMU chapter history. He was chosen for the distinction because of “his firm commitment to liberal studies and scholarship, the values crucial to intellectual life in academe,” says Associate Professor of English Bonnie Wheeler, a member of Phi Beta Kappa’s national nominating committee.

Isaac Mbiti, Economics, Dedman College, has been named a Martin Luther King Visiting Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the 2010-11 academic year and will teach and conduct research through the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab in MIT’s Economics Department. The lab seeks to change the way public policy is made by determining the most cost-effective approaches for tackling poverty.

Angela Ards, English, Dedman College, has been named a 2010-11 Fellow to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. The Fellowship will allow her to research and write, with access to the Harvard and Radcliffe library resources, and to exchange ideas with a multidisciplinary community of Fellows from the humanities, the social sciences and the creative arts.

SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility has announced the recipients of its 2010-11 Maguire Teaching Fellow Awards. Soraya Gollop, Philosophy, Dedman College, will design a course tentatively entitled “Medical Ethics.” Thomas Siems, Engineering Management, Information and Systems, Lyle School of Engineering, will design a course entitled “Ethics in Engineering.” The Maguire Center offers one or more $3,000 grants every year to professors who develop a new course relating to ethics, or who add an ethical dimension to an existing course.

Calendar Highlights: March 2, 2010

Dr. Laura BermanSpring Break begins: Save the dates – SMU’s 2010 Spring Break takes place March 6-14. Keep an eye on the SMU Forum for campus hours and activities information.

2010 Women’s Symposium: “Answers Empower: You Can Ask the Questions” is the theme for SMU’s 45th Annual Women’s Symposium March 3 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Therapist, sex educator, columnist, radio host and women’s health leader Dr. Laura Berman (right) will deliver the Emmie V. Baine Lecture during lunch. For more information, visit the Women’s Symposium website.

Maguire Public Scholar Lecture: Wayne Shaw, Helmut Sohmen Distinguished Professor of Corporate Governance in SMU’s Cox School of Business, will discuss possible reasons for the failure of managers to properly identify and mitigate conflicts of interest in “Ethics and Business: An Inherent Conflict?” on March 2 in Karcher Auditorium, Storey Hall, Dedman School of Law. Heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served at 11:30 a.m., followed by the lecture noon-1 p.m. Sponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility. Free and open to the public.

Clements Center Brown Bag Lecture: Clements Center Fellow Cathleen Cahill will discuss “Federal Fathers and Mothers: The United States Indian Service, 1869-1933” noon-1 p.m. March 17, Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Presented by SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Dedman College. Bring your lunch.

Bob Buford receives ethics award from SMU Feb. 10

Bob BufordBob Buford, whose Halftime organization inspires business and professional leaders to direct their talents toward service, will be honored as recipient of the 2010 J. Erik Jonsson Ethics Award during a noon luncheon Feb. 10 at the Belo Mansion in Dallas.

The award is presented annually by SMU’s Cary Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility to individuals who exemplify the spirit of moral leadership and public virtue.

“The Maguire Center is proud to honor a person whose inspiration and guidance have had such a profound and deep impact on the lives of thousands of others in Dallas and around the world,” said Maguire Center director Tom Mayo. “Bob Buford has dedicated the second half of his career and life to helping others attain ‘lives of significance,’ by which Bob means ‘lives of service.'”

Until the sale of his company in July 1999, Buford served as Chairman of the Board and CEO of Buford Television, Inc., a family owned cable television business. He co-founded Leadership Network in 1984, a non-profit church growth consulting firm, and became founding chairman in 1988 of what is now known as the Leader to Leader Institute, which helps guide managers in social service organizations. In 1995, Buford wrote Halftime, a book on finding fulfillment in the second half of life that grew to an organization bearing the same name.

J. Erik Jonsson was a founder of Texas Instruments, a strong advocate for education and a public-spirited mayor of Dallas from 1964 to 1971. Past winners of the J. Erik Jonsson Award include Ronald G. Steinhart, Michael M. Boone, Zan W. Holmes Jr., Roger Staubach, Caren Prothro, Tom Luce, Ron Anderson, Jack Lowe, Jr., William T. Solomon, Stanley H. Marcus, Charles C. Sprague and Curtis W. Meadows, Jr.

For ticket information, call the Maguire Center at 214-768-4575.

Read more from SMU News

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 3, 2009

Akira SatoAll that jazz: SMU’s Meadows Jazz Orchestra under the direction of Akira Sato (right) presents an evening of small-group jazz featuring classic works such as Stella by Starlight by Victor Young, Take Five by Dave Brubeck, Windows by Chick Corea and Groovin’ High by Dizzy Gillespie. The concert begins at 8 p.m. Nov. 3 in the Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public. For more information, call the Division of Music at 214-768-1951.

Maguire Public Scholar Lecture: Law Professor Jenia Turner will examine the limits of advocacy in representing clients accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide in “Ethical Dilemmas of International Criminal Defense Attorneys,” part of the “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” series. The lecture takes place noon-1 p.m. Nov. 5 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center West and Central Ballrooms; heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served at 11:30 a.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program. Free and open to the public; no RSVP necessary.

Gilbert Lecture Series: Poet Jeff Dolven, professor of Renaissance literature at Princeton University and author of Scenes of Instruction in Renaissance Romance, speaks on “Styles of Disjunction” Nov. 5 in DeGolyer Library. Reception at 6 p.m. in the Texana Room; lecture at 6:30 p.m. in the Stanley Marcus Reading Room. Free and open to the public. Presented by the Department of English, Dedman College.

Meadows Chamber Music Showcase: Performers will present chamber works ranging from the early Classical period to the 20th century at 8 p.m. Nov. 6 and 2 p.m. Nov. 8 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Free and open to the public. For more information, call the Division of Music, 214-768-1951.

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 15, 2009

Illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250, from SMU's Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible CollectionGood books: Nearly 60 remarkable bibles – including Medieval, Renaissance, Reformation and early American editions – are on view in “The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible Collection” in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries, Bridwell Library, through Dec. 11, 2009. For more information call 214-768-3483 or visit the Bridwell Library website. (Right, a page from an illuminated Paris Vulgate, ca. 1250.)

Patriotic pride: SMU celebrates Constitution Day 2009 at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 17 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons. The Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution and the traveling Liberty Bell will be present, and cake and punch will be served. For more information, contact Mariana Sullivan, 214-768-4498.

Remembering a pioneer: Author and editor Charlotte Whaley will give a lecture on her latest work – a collection of memoirs by Alice Marriott, one of the first women in the Southwest to hold an advanced degree in anthropology and who studied Southwestern American Indian culture. Reception at 6 p.m., lecture at 6:30 p.m., followed by a book signing for Alice Marriott Remembered. All events take place in SMU’s DeGolyer Library. Sponsored by Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon and DeGolyer Library. For more information, call 214-768-3225.

“Holocaust Legacies” lecture: Georgetown University Professor of Philosophy Thomas Beauchamp, senior research scholar with the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and primary author of the Belmont Report, will participate in a lecture and panel discussion, “From the Nuremburg Code to the Belmont Report and the Final Rule: The Protection of Human Research Subjects in the 21st Century,” Sept. 17 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 6:30 p.m., lecture at 7 p.m. Presented by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility and Human Rights Education Program as part of “Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point.” Free and open to the public.

'Galileo Goes to Jail' book coverStanton Sharp Lecture: Author, editor and historian Ronald L. Numbers (Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion), Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss “Anti-Evolution in America: From Creation Science to Intelligent Design” Sept. 18 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Reception at 3:30 p.m., lecture at 4 p.m. Sponsored by SMU’s Clements Department of History, Dedman College. For more information, contact the history department, 214-768-2967, or visit its Sharp Lectures web page.

Fun and games: Prospective students can explore The Guildhall at SMU during its Fall 2009 open house, 10 a.m.-noon Sept. 19 at the SMU-in-Plano campus, 5232 Tennyson Parkway, Building 2. Activities include food and games for all ages and a bounce house for kids, plus LEGO Star Wars for gaming enthusiasts. RSVP online at the Guildhall website.

Tate-Willson Lecture: Nigel Biggar – Regius Professor of Moral and Pastoral Theology and director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life at the University of Oxford – will discuss “Behaving in Public: Christian Ethics in a Polyglot Secularity” at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 22 in 106 Prothro Hall. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Graduate Program in Religious Studies Office, 214-768-2432. Presented by the Graduate Program in Religious Studies and cosponsored by SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

New lecture series explores Holocaust’s lingering impact

'Holocaust Legacies' posterSMU’s Human Rights Education Program is cosponsoring a three-month series of lectures, symposiums, film screenings, photography exhibits and musical performances examining how the Holocaust continues to affect the world.

“Holocaust Legacies: Shoah as Turning Point” begins Sept. 9 with a 7 p.m. reception and a 7:30 p.m. introductory panel discussion in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Forum. The program will run through the end of November with events held both on and off the SMU campus, and all events are free and open to the public.

Panel members on Sept. 9 will include Christopher Anderson, associate professor of sacred music in Perkins School of Theology; Janis Bergman-Carton, art history chair in Meadows School of the Arts; Elliott Dlin, executive director of the Dallas Holocaust Museum; Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Human Rights Education Program and Tom Mayo, director of SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility.

Halperin, who each December escorts educational groups to former Nazi death camp locations in Poland, is committed to raising awareness of what he calls “the crime within the war,” even as the number of people who lived through the war, and the Holocaust, dwindles with each passing year. September marks the 70th anniversary of the Nazi German invasion of Poland and beginning of World War II.

“It’s safe to say most Americans don’t think about World War II any more,” Halperin said. “We fought the war, defeated the Nazis, and came home the good guys. We mushroomed into a world power. Most Americans since then have lived a relatively safe and comfortable life.”

But the legacy of the Holocaust continues at many levels, Halperin said: The Nazis committed the greatest art theft in history, looting the collections of Jewish families whose descendents are still litigating to see their treasures returned. All major war crime tribunals bear the stamp of the post-World War II Nuremburg Trials, and the United States in May deported a nearly 90-year-old man, John Demjanjuk, for Nazi war crimes.

Halperin noted that in Europe, sensitivity to the Shoah’s legacy is reflected even in restrictions to how people talk and write about the Nazi regime. “You can buy a copy of Adolph Hitler’s Mein Kampf in the SMU Book Store – that’s free speech,” Halperin explained. “You can deny the Holocaust in the U.S., and that’s free speech, too. You can’t do that in Europe.” Halperin said he expects the series to be “a powerful, emotional, somber and sobering series of events.”

Co-sponsors for the 2009 Fall Program Series are SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance, SMU Meadows School of the Arts, SMU Perkins School of Theology, TCU’s Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Department of Social Work and the University of Dallas.

Find a complete schedule at the SMU News site

Tune In: Understanding the Rwandan genocide

Rwanda in Central Africa was the scene of the mass killing of hundreds of thousands of Tutsis and Hutu political moderates in 1994 by Hutus over the course of 100 days.

In April, Mark McPhail spoke about his experiences as an expert witness before the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (UNICTR) in 2008. McPhail, chair of the Division of Corporate Communications and Public Affairs in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, shared his personal reflections on the tragedy, its political and moral legacies, and the implications it holds for international justice and reconciliation in the 21st century. The lecture was presented by SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility. Click the YouTube screen to watch the video.

To help students better understand the genocide, SMU’s Human Rights Education Program traveled to Rwanda during summer 2009, where the group visited such sites as the Nyarubuye Genocide Memorial and Urukundo Home for Children. Laura, one of the group, blogged for SMU Student Adventures about her experiences and impressions – including a visit to Murambi, the site of some of the worst massacres of the genocide.

Read Laura’s Rwanda blog
Visit SMU Student Adventures
Read more about the Rwanda Genocide

Faculty in the News: May 11, 2009

Matt Wilson, Political Science, Dedman College, discussed the movement to stop President Obama from making the commencement address at Notre Dame with The Associated Press. The resulting article appeared in The Los Angeles Times May 10, 2009.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, talked about incumbents, especially Republicans, in Congress seeking higher office as a path to better opportunities with USA Today May 4, 2009.

James Hollifield, Tower Center for Political Studies, Dedman College, provided expertise on the tight connection between Texas and Mexico in a story about the H1N1 flu’s impact on Mexico’s economy that appeared in The San Francisco Chronicle May 3, 2009.

Tom Mayo, Dedman School of Law and Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility, was interviewed for a feature story on Poem In Your Pocket Day that appeared in The Dallas Morning News April 30. 2009. Also featured in the article was SMU senior Jesse Smith, an English/creative writing major in Dedman College.

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