Lewis Binford’s legacy of change and innovation

Lewis Binford

Lewis Binford’s legacy of change and innovation

Lewis BinfordLewis R. Binford, SMU Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, died April 11, 2011 in Kirksville, Missouri. During his 40-year career as an archaeologist, Binford transformed scientists’ approach to archaeology, earning a legacy as the “most influential archaeologist of his generation,” according to Scientific American.

Binford first gained attention in 1962 as an assistant professor at the University of Chicago when he wrote a path-breaking article in American Antiquity proposing that archaeologists abandon their emphasis on cataloguing artifacts and instead study what the artifacts revealed about prehistoric cultures. The proposition launched what is now known as “New Archaeology.”

“Lewis Binford led the charge that pushed, pulled and otherwise cajoled archaeology into becoming a more scientific enterprise,” says David Meltzer, Henderson-Morrison Professor of Prehistory in SMU’s Dedman College. “The impact of his work was felt not only here in America, but around the world. Much of how we conceptualize and carry out archaeology in the 21st century is owed to Lew’s substantial legacy.”

From Alaska to Australia, Binford conducted research throughout the world, focusing much of his attention on the archaeology of hunting and gathering. He spent 20 years in remote areas of Africa, Alaska and Australia conducting research on cultural patterns of contemporary hunter-gatherers and reviving the practice of ethnoarchaeology – the study of living societies to better understand societies of the past.

Cover of Lewis Binford's 'Constructing Frames of Reference: An Analytical Method for Archaeological Theory Building Using Ethnographic and Environmental Data Sets'He wrote 18 books and more than 130 articles, book chapters and reviews. His most recent book, Constructing Frames of Reference: An Analytical Method for Archaeological Theory Building Using Ethnographic and Environmental Data Sets (University of California Press, 2001), is considered a landmark in the study of hunter-gatherer populations.

His honors included membership in the National Academy of Sciences, the Huxley Memorial Medal from the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, the Montelius Medal from the Swedish Archaeological Society and the Centennial Medal from the Portuguese Archaeological Society. He received in 2006 the Society for American Archaeology‘s Lifetime Achievement Award.

The International Astronomical Union named an asteroid for Binford in 2010 in honor of his contributions to the improvement of the study of archaeology. Read more from the SMU Forum, Aug. 27, 2010.

Binford earned a bachelor’s degree in anthropology in 1957 from the University of North Carolina and a master’s degree in 1958 and Ph.D. in 1964 from the University of Michigan. He served on the faculties of the University of Chicago, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the University of California at Los Angeles before joining the faculty at the University of New Mexico. He remained a member of the faculty there from 1968 through 1991 when he joined SMU.

“Any time a university can add a National Academy of Science-quality person to its faculty is a major gain for the university and the region,” says James Brooks, who played an important role in bringing Binford to SMU. Brooks is SMU provost emeritus and chair of SMU’s Institute for Study of Earth and Man. “Binford brought distinction to SMU, to Dallas and the Southwest.”

Binford is survived by his wife, Amber Johnson, and his daughter, Martha Binford. Funeral arrangements are pending.

April 13, 2011|News|

For the Record: Aug. 27, 2010

Asteroid 213629 BinfordLewis Binford, Anthropology, Dedman College, has been honored with an asteroid named for him by the International Astronomical Union. The naming citation for Asteroid (213629) Binford reads, in part, “[Lewis Binford] was one of the main figures behind the development of the ‘New Archaeology’ or ‘Processual Archaeology,’ the major theoretical and methodological improvements to archaeology taking place during the 1960s to 1980s.”

The object was discovered in November 2004 on images taken in August 2002 by the 1.2-meter Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) telescope at Mt. Palomar, California. It is an MB II asteroid, orbiting between Mars and Jupiter with an orbital period of 4 years, a minimum distance to the sun of 2.38 astronomical units (AU) and an estimated size of slightly over 1 kilometer. See the asteroid’s 3D orbit diagram at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory website. (Top right, a composite of three images documenting the asteroid’s discovery, showing it as a tiny moving dot. Click the image for a larger version. Images courtesy of NEAT/NASA.)

Lynne Jackson, Music, Meadows School of the Arts, has received a 2010 Meritorious Achievement Award from the Texas Bandmasters Association (TBA). TBA President and SMU professor Brian Merrill presented the award during the organization’s annual convention and clinic in July in San Antonio. The award honors “those who have made a difference in the lives of band students in Texas” and “who exemplify the qualities of a good band director.”

Cat with serape, ca. 1860Norwick Center for Digital Services, Central University Librares, has received a $20,000 TexTreasures grant to digitize, catalog and upload 2,500 items into the University’s Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection. The annual competitive grant program is designed to help member libraries make their special collections more accessible. Funding is available for projects that involve cataloging, indexing, and digitizing local materials with statewide significance.

NCDS and DeGolyer Library will digitize 19th-century photographs from the Lawrence T. Jones Texas photography collection . This collection, which contains 5,000 photographs, depicts Texans from a variety of cultural groups: Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and American Indian, as well as locations from all regions of the state. (Bottom right, Cat posed with Mexican serape, ca. 1860 from the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection.)

August 27, 2010|For the Record|
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