José Bowen

Nadia Sirota, Tania Bruguera named 2013-14 Meadow Prize winners

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has announced that violist Nadia Sirota and interdisciplinary artist Tania Bruguera are the recipients of its 4th annual Meadows Prize arts residency.

The Meadows Prize is awarded to pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile, active in a discipline represented by one of the academic units within the Meadows School.

“The aim of the Meadows Prize is to connect artists at the forefront of their fields with our students and with the community – artists who produce new ideas, new work or new methods,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “Nadia and Tania push the boundaries of contemporary music and performance art, and our students will have the incredible opportunity to work directly with them. We are eager to see what develops from their residencies in Dallas.”

Nadia Sirota is best known for her unique interpretations of new scores and for premiering works by some of the most talented composers of her generation, including Marcos Balter, Caleb Burhans, Judd Greenstein, Missy Mazzoli and Nico Muhly. She is a founding member of ACME (the American Contemporary Music Ensemble), yMusic, and the Wordless Music Orchestra and is a regular guest with groups such as the Meredith Monk Ensemble, Alarm Will Sound and Continuum.

Sirota’s debut album, First Things First, was a New York Times 2009 record of the year. In addition to her work as a performer, she has served on the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music in its new contemporary music performance master’s degree program since 2007. She will be in residency at SMU April 1-14, 2013 and Oct. 7-19, 2013 and will collaborate with student musicians on the development of new compositions and performance techniques.

Tania Bruguera is a Cuban-born interdisciplinary artist working primarily in behavior art, performance, installation and video – with much of her work pivoting around growing concerns about the political representation and conditions facing immigrants. Her work has been featured in Documenta 11 in Germany and in the Venice, Johannesburg, Sáo Paolo, Shanghai and Havana biennials.

In March 2011, Bruguera began a five-year social project, Immigrant Movement International, the first year of which was sponsored by Meadows Prize winner Creative Time and the Queens Museum of Art. IM International functions as a think tank for immigrant issues; from its storefront headquarters in Corona, Queens, Bruguera and other staff and volunteers offer free educational, artistic and consciousness-raising activities to a community of immigrants. Bruguera is a proponent of “arte útil” (useful art), meaning art that can be implemented in people’s lives in ways that address social and political problems. In February, she will launch a new project with the Queens Museum and Van Abbemuseum in the Netherlands, culminating in the transformation of the old building of the Van Abbemuseum into the Museum of Arte Útil this fall. Bruguera will be in residency at SMU April 7-20, 2013 and Sept. 22-Oct. 5, 2013.

Inaugurated in October 2009, the Meadows Prize is presented each January to up to two pioneering artists. It includes support for a four-week residency in Dallas, in addition to a $25,000 stipend. In return, recipients are expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and collaborating arts organizations, and to leave a lasting legacy in Dallas, such as a work of art that remains in the community, a composition or piece of dramatic writing that would be performed locally, or a new way of teaching in a particular discipline.

> Read the full story from SMU News
> Learn more about SMU’s Meadows Prize

Good reading, good giving: SMU books for 2012

From art, history and religion to sweet Texas cuisine and fiction, SMU’s 2012 book roundup offers a wide selection to satisfy the readers in your life. Treat yourself or those on your gift list to one of the current titles listed below the link.

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$1.5 million gift to fund new endowed chair in Art History

John B. and Marsha Kleinheinz

John B. and Marsha Kleinheinz

A $1.5 million gift from the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education will establish an endowed chair in the Division of Art History in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

“We are deeply grateful to the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for its generosity and visionary support,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “This gift will enable Meadows School of the Arts to add further strength to the faculty and academic offerings in one of the school’s leading departments. The gift supports a major goal of SMU’s Second Century Campaign to endow 100 faculty positions and brings the current total to 86.”

> The Dallas Morning News: Robert Miller: SMU’s Meadows School of Arts receives $1.5 million boost

The Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education is a private charitable foundation supported through contributions from Marsha and John B. Kleinheinz of Fort Worth. Their daughter, Marguerite, graduated from Meadows School of the Arts in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in art history.

“We are very impressed with Marguerite’s experience at the Meadows School and SMU. Meadows Dean José Bowen has made great progress during his tenure,” said Marsha Kleinheinz, president of the Kleinheinz Family Endowment. “We want to support the future of the University that is so important to our family.”

John Kleinheinz, a Stanford University graduate, started his career as an investment banker engaged in corporate finance and mergers and acquisitions for Nomura Securities and Merrill Lynch in Tokyo, New York and London. In 1996 he established Kleinheinz Capital Partners, Inc., a private investment management firm in Fort Worth.

Marsha Kleinheinz earned a B.B.A. degree from SMU in 1983. She is currently involved in several charitable organizations, including Gill Children’s Services, The Warm Place, The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Van Cliburn Foundation, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, Performing Arts of Fort Worth and North Texas Public Broadcasting. The Kleinheinzes have three children.

“Our art history faculty are doing remarkable new things that will change the way art is studied,” said Dean Bowen. “With this exceptionally generous gift, we will be able to recruit and retain outstanding professors and continue to enhance our reputation as one of the very best art history departments in the country.”

SMU Provost Paul Ludden added, “The Kleinheinz Family Endowed Chair in Art History will help to ensure the continued development of the Art History Division as one of SMU’s strongest academic units. It will enhance the entire University as a center of excellence for historical studies.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

Meadows at the Meyerson 2012 honors Gloria and Jack Hammack

The Meadows Orchestra under the direction of Paul Phillips

SMU’s Meadows Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Paul Phillips.

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts will present its 19th annual benefit concert, “The 2012 Meadows at the Meyerson,” at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, in the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center at 2301 Flora Street in Dallas.

Held each spring, the concert features the critically acclaimed Meadows Symphony Orchestra and honors a community leader. This year’s honorees are noted arts and civic patrons and Meadows School supporters Gloria ’52 and Jack Hammack.

Under the direction of conductor Paul Phillips, the Meadows Symphony will perform Gustav Mahler’s Ninth Symphony. Completed in 1909 after the composer had been diagnosed with a fatal heart condition, the work seems to reflect Mahler’s acceptance of impending death while affirming the beauty of life. The eloquent and poignant symphony is Mahler’s last, and is considered one of his greatest.

“Since its inception, Meadows at the Meyerson has been our most important fundraising event,” says Meadows Dean José Bowen. “Thanks to the generosity of many supporters, it has raised more than $2.6 million to benefit our students, our programs and our educational mission. For the past four years, it has served as an important source of scholarship funds for our Meadows Scholars program, enabling us to recruit the most outstanding arts and communications students from across the nation to Dallas and SMU. We are now proud to support 60 Meadows Scholars at the university, thanks to the generosity of our Meadows at the Meyerson benefactors.”

Tickets to the Meadows at the Meyerson concert are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors, and $15 for students and SMU faculty and staff. For tickets, contact the Meadows Box Office, 214-768-2787.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Will Power joins Meadows theatre faculty as Artist-in-Residence

Playwright and performer Will Power works with SMU students during his Meadows Prize residency. Power has been named Artist-in-Residence in the Meadows School of the Arts Division of Theatre, effective Fall 2012.

Meadows Prize-winning playwright and performer Will Power has been named to a new position as Artist-in-Residence in the Division of Theatre in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, beginning with the Fall 2012 semester.

A veteran of theatre, film and television, Power has won multiple awards for his work, which bridges the gap between the spoken word of hip-hop and traditional theatre. Power spent four weeks at SMU last fall as a winner of the 2010 Meadows Prize, the international arts residency launched by the Meadows School in Fall 2009. During his visits to SMU, Power worked with Meadows student actors and designers to create a new theatre work from the ground up. The play, Alice Underground, gave a modern spin to the tale of Alice in Wonderland and was performed in the Margo Jones Theatre.

Power also led workshops for students at L.G. Pinkston High School in West Dallas, working with a group of teens on break dancing, rhyming and emceeing; the students learned how to use their art as a means to uplift and inspire.

Power’s work in Dallas as a Meadows Prize winner was a partnership between the Meadows School of the Arts and the Dallas Theater Center (DTC). This winter, he returned to Dallas to begin working with the DTC to write and develop a new theatre piece, Stagger Lee. He also gave a public talk at SMU as part of the Meadows School’s new Forum for Art and Urban Engagement, and met with local arts and culture leaders to talk about how artists can best engage with their communities.

As an artist-in-residence, Power will teach in the Division of Theatre and continue to work with community groups. “I’ve had a great experience working with the students in Dallas, and have been really impressed with the city and the opportunities it offers for artists,” says Power. “I’m excited to continue to engage the SMU community and the Dallas theatre community.”

“We are thrilled to have Will Power join us as an artist-in-residence,” says Meadows Dean José Bowen. “During his Meadows Prize residency, he demonstrated that it is possible to work with a community, bring multiple art forms together, experiment and also produce great art. Will helped students both at SMU and Pinkston understand that they can take risks and speak in their own voice.”

A veteran of theatre, film and television, Power has been called “the best verse playwright in America” (New York Magazine) whose work “…combines the complexity of serious drama with the visual and sonic arsenal of MTV” (The New York Times).  His drama Fetch Clay, Make Man, starring Ben Vereen, had its world premiere at the McCarter Theatre Center in Princeton in January 2010 under the direction of Tony Award-winning director Des McAnuff. Power’s adaptation of the Greek tragedy Seven Against Thebes, retitled The Seven, enjoyed a successful Off-Broadway run at the New York Theatre Workshop in 2006 and The La Jolla Playhouse in 2008. His solo show FLOW was featured in New York’s Hip Hop Theater Festival before touring nationally and internationally to critical acclaim. Power was the 2010-2011 AETNA New Voices Fellow at Hartford Stage, where he is also under commission.

Power’s awards include a United States Artist Prudential Fellowship, a Lucille Lortel Award for Best Musical, the TCG Peter Zeisler Memorial Award, a Jury Award for Best Theatre Performance at the HBO U.S. Comedy Arts Festival, a Drama Desk Award nomination, and the Trailblazer Award from The National Black Theater Network.  Power’s numerous film and television appearances include The Steven Colbert Report (Comedy Central) and Bill Moyers on Faith and Reason(PBS).

Originally from the Fillmore District in San Francisco, Will Power will be moving to Dallas from Beacon, New York, with his wife Marla and their two children.

> Visit Will Power’s website at willpower.tv
> Learn more about the SMU Meadows Division of Theatre

Two Irish artists win 2012 Meadows Prize

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has selected two Irish artists – choreographer Michael Keegan-Dolan and playwright and screenwriter Enda Walsh – as the recipients of the 3rd annual Meadows Prize arts residency.

2012 SMU Meadows Prize winner Michael Keegan-Dolan

Dublin native Michael Keegan-Dolan has been widely referred to as “the most unique choreographic voice to have emerged from Ireland in the last half century.” He is co-founder and artistic director of Dublin’s Fabulous Beast Dance Theatre, an award-winning company launched in 1997. He has written, directed, choreographed and co-produced critically acclaimed works with Fabulous Beast that combine the visual element of dance with the narrative power of theatre. His choreographic works have been produced at prestigious venues throughout Europe and the U.S., including the Royal Opera House in London, Bayerische Staatsoper in Munich, and the Houston Grand Opera. In 2009, SMU Theatre Professor Bill Lengfelder collaborated on and performed in a Fabulous Beast production of The Rite of Spring that was nominated for a 2010 Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production.

2012 SMU Meadows Prize winner Enda WalshEnda Walsh, also a Dublin native, achieved prominence when he won two prestigious playwriting awards in 1997, the George Devine Award and the Stewart Parker Award, with his play Disco Pigs, a story of an obsessive teen relationship that ends in tragedy. He has since written numerous other award-winning plays, including The Walworth Farce and The New Electric Ballroom, and has been named by the Guardian as “one of the most dazzling wordsmiths of contemporary theatre.” In 2009, SMU’s Meadows Theatre staged a production of Walsh’s play Chat Room as part of its “Three Repertory Shows” season opener. Walsh is also a successful screenwriter; his 2008 biopic, Hunger, told the story of the final days of IRA hunger striker Bobby Sands and won a host of awards, including the Camera d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Walsh currently lives in London.

The pair will be in residency at SMU at the same time in Fall 2012 for four weeks. They will collaborate with SMU theatre and dance students to create a new dance/theatre piece tentatively slated for a major European festival in 2013. The piece also will receive public workshop performances in Dallas during their residency.

“Michael and Enda were nominated separately by two individuals, but we subsequently learned that not only have they known each other for more than 20 years, they were looking for an opportunity to collaborate on a large project,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “They are both daring artists with compatible aesthetics, and it seemed a perfect opportunity for our students and for Dallas.”

Inaugurated in October 2009, the Meadows Prize is presented each fall to up to two pioneering artists. It includes support for a four-to-eight-week residency in Dallas, in addition to a $25,000 stipend. In return, recipients are expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and collaborating arts organizations, and to leave a lasting legacy in Dallas, such as a work of art that remains in the community, a composition or piece of dramatic writing that would be performed locally, or a new way of teaching in a particular discipline.

> Read the full story at SMU News

Greg Warden named president of Franklin College in Switzerland

SMU Professor P. Gregory WardenGreg Warden, University Distinguished Professor of Art History and associate dean for research and academic affairs in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, has been named the 4th president of Franklin College in Lugano, Switzerland, effective July 1, 2012. Warden will leave the University at the end of the 2011-12 school year following an eminent 30-year career at SMU.

“We are very sorry to see Greg leave SMU, but at the same time we are thrilled for him – it’s an incredible honor to be chosen for such an important and prestigious position, and we know he will make an exceptional leader for Franklin College,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “SMU has an ongoing relationship with Franklin – a number of our students study abroad there each year. We look forward to maintaining a close collaboration with Greg and with Franklin College in the coming years.”

“While I am looking forward to this leadership opportunity at Franklin College, I will miss SMU and the community that has been so supportive of Diane and me over the past 30 years,” Warden said. “SMU is an exceptional institution, the Meadows School under José Bowen’s leadership is an exciting and inspiring place, and Dallas is one of the most welcoming and supportive cities in the world. I look forward to maintaining close ties with our many friends and colleagues in Texas.”

Following an 11-month international search, Dr. Warden was unanimously chosen by Franklin’s board of trustees from a pool of more than 100 experienced and diverse candidates, including former and sitting college presidents and deans, university provosts and leading intellectuals in a variety of academic disciplines and professional fields.

“Dr. Warden’s accomplishments and profile made him a compelling candidate from the start,” said Pascal F. Tone, chairman of the board at Franklin. “Few individuals possess the unique blend of successful experiences in scholarship, higher education leadership, dedication to students, capacity to attract resources and managerial acumen that he now brings to Franklin.”

Warden has taught at SMU since 1982 and has earned numerous accolades during his tenure with the university. He was named Meadows Foundation Distinguished Teaching Professor in 1995 and Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor at SMU in 2011. In addition to serving as associate dean for research and academic affairs for the Meadows School since 1988, he was chair of the Art History Department for six years, interim director of the Meadows Museum, and interim chair of the Division of Arts Administration for two years.

In addition, he co-founded and directed the SMU-in-Italy program for more than 20 years. In 2011, the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded a $200,000 grant in support of a summer institute for college teachers, led by Dr. Warden, which will examine Etruscan and Roman culture on-site in Italy.

> Read the full story at SMU News

SMU receives Hispanic College Fund’s Legacy Award

Hispanic College Fund logoSMU received the Hispanic College Fund‘s 2009 Legacy Award for leadership and investment in a diverse student population during the 16th Annual Portraits of Success gala Oct. 30 in Washington, D.C. This year marks the first time that an educational institution has received the honor, which is typically given to federal agencies.

SMU was chosen for its exceptional commitment to the recruitment of Hispanic students, the level of support provided to the Hispanic Youth Symposium, its community leadership and the ability to create a genuine community-led event.

This summer, SMU hosted Texas’ first Hispanic Youth Symposium, a program to promote higher education to at-risk Hispanic youth in partnership with the Dallas Independent School District, Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District and the Social Security Administration. In addition to the Legacy Award, the gala honors 477 scholarship recipients and corporate supporters of the organization.

SMU representatives accepting the award on behalf of the University included Associate Provost Tom Tunks, Meadows School of the Arts Dean José Bowen and Associate Director of Diversity and Community Outreach Raul Magdaleno.

SMU President R. Gerald Turner said the Legacy Award coincides with SMU’s goal to attract more Hispanic students.

“We are committed to broadening our outreach efforts to Hispanic students,” Turner said. “At SMU, they bring important perspectives and enrich the campus experience for all students. These are the men and women who will be leading our region and nation in all areas of achievement.”

Read more from SMU News.

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